pastries

New York City’s Top Pastry Chefs Give Back At Pastryland

photography boardOn March 9th, the International Culinary Center held the second Pastryland Bake Sale benefiting Hot Bread Kitchen. More than 350 dessert lovers attended to taste exclusive pastries from 19 of New York City’s best pastry chefs, all while raising $5,350 for Hot Bread Kitchen, a non-profit organization providing culinary training to low-income women in NYC. The afternoon, which featured unique artisanal treats and re-imagined classics, showcased the talents and limitless imaginations of pastry chefs. Alumni of ICC’s Professional Pastry Arts program donated some of the day’s favorites including Tyler Atwell’s (Lafayette Grand Café & Bakery) Chocolate Ring Ding, Anna Bolz’s (Per Se) Toasted Coconut Layer Cake, Lindsey Farr’s (Restaurant Marc Forgione) Snicker’s Donut, Charlotte Neuville’s (Charlotte Neuville Cakes + Confections) Miniature Cake Tasting, and Shaun Velez’s (Café Boulud) Mini Pistachio Gateaux. Even our very own Stephen Collucci, ICC Pastry Chef Instructor, got in on the fun with a Chocolate Dipped Fluffernutter cookie!

 

 

The event would not have been possible without the support of our Partner, Callebaut®, who not only generously donated the chocolate for all 19 chefs, but also unveiled the new RB1 ruby couveture in limited-edition desserts to consumers for the first time ever in New York City. A selected group of pastry chefs and chocolatiers rose to the occasion and crafted original sweets featuring the rosy color tones and fruity flavor of ruby cacao. The Ruby Velvet Choux from Monica Ng of Great Performances, Ruby Bon Bons from Christopher Curtin’s Eclat Chocolates, Mexican Ruby Scribble Cookie from Fany Gerson of La Newyorkina, Ruby Snack Bar from Dimitriy Shurygin of The Key Patisserie offered attendees a beautiful visual.

ruby

Gold Sponsor, Beurremont Butter, as well as Nielsen-Massey Vanilla provided our contributing pastry chefs with product to use in their sweet creations. This came in handy for bakery specialties like the PB+J Kouign Amann by Rory Macdonald of Patisserie Chanson, Baklava Croissant by Scott Cioe of Bien Cuit, and Sprezzatura Sourdough by Daniel Alvarez of Daily Provisions.

golden egg cream station

Specialty beverages provided by Joe’s Coffee and Rishi Tea & Botanicals, as well as Evian and Badoit, were available for purchase. In addition, guests were treated to a free Gold Egg Cream shot featuring a housemade Callebaut® Gold Chocolate syrup with milk, topped with Badoit sparkling water dispensed from giant gold chocolate eggs!

joes coffee
rishi tea
evian
badoit

jacques torres and ron ben israelFinally, a day of pastry fun wouldn’t be complete without an Instagram-friendly moment, or two! ICC’s Dean of Pastry Arts, Jacques Torres and Guest Master Pastry Chef, Ron Ben-Israel surprised attendees with a photo op at our 8 foot piped royal icing wall (which used a total of 110 pounds of royal icing).

We would like to thank all of the chefs, restaurants and bakeries who participated (see full list below), as well as our partners and sponsors who made this afternoon possible (see the full list here). A special thank you to everyone who came to Pastryland this year and gave back to the NYC food community in the sweetest way! Check out the weekend’s sweet treats below!

Exclusive Pastryland Desserts

All 19 Desserts Pictured

Chef Dmitriy Shurygin | The Key Patisserie | Ruby Snack Bar

Chef Lindsey Farr | Restaurant Marc Forgione | Snickers Donut

Chef Scott Cioe | Bien Cuit | Baklava Croissant

Chef Daniel Alvarez | Union Square Cafe and Daily Provisions | Chocolate Hazelnut Tart

Chef Jin Capobianco | The River Cafe | Hazelnut Mocha Opera

Chef Rory Macdonald | Patisserie Chanson + Dessert Bar | PB+J Kouign Amann

Chef Stephen Collucci | International Culinary Center | Chocolate Dipped Fluffernutter

Chef Jeffrey Wurtz | Aureole | Dorayaki with Sweet Red Bean and Chocolate Sesame

The Bakers of Hot Bread Kitchen | Hot Bread Kitchen | Chocolate Babka

Chef Tyler Atwell | Lafayette Grand Café & Bakery | Chocolate Ring Ding

Chef Lindsey Bittner | Leonelli Restaurants | Cacao Nib Butter Cookies

Monica Ng | Great Performances | Ruby Velvet Choux

Chef Anna Bolz | Per Se | Coconut Layer Cake

Chef Charlotte Neuville | Charlotte Neuville Cakes + Confections | Mini Cake Tasting

Chef Fany Gerson | La Newyorkina | Ruby Scribble Cookies

Chef Shaun Velez | Café Boulud | Mini Pistachio Gateux with vanilla buttercream and raspberry pate de fruit

Chef Joe Murphy | Counter Hospitality | Meyer Lemon Madelienes

Chef Daniel Alvarez | Union Square Café and Daily ProvisionsSprezzatura Sourdough

Chef Christopher Curtin | Éclat ChocolateRuby Bonbons

Chef Julie Elkind | Bâtard Pate a Choux filled with Caramel Chocolate Ganache and Tropical Fruit Compote

Deconstructed carrot cake

Elements of Developing an Original Dessert

When ICC re-launched the Professional Pastry Arts program in 2014, the curriculum was updated to better serve today’s pastry chef, educating our students to understand the science and technique behind a wide range of pastry skills to unlock their creativity—to think beyond a single recipe.

It was during this time that Restaurant Day was born, providing students with the opportunity to demonstrate everything they’ve learned in the 600-hour program to their friends and family in a fun and unique dessert tasting. Every Restaurant Day menu is different, designed, created and produced by the students with a unifying theme to best represent their experiences in the program. Throughout the years, over 250 original desserts have been created—including a Matcha Cake Trifle, Carrot Beignets, Coquito Cheesecake and Sweet Corn Fraisier—showcasing the creativity of the next generation of pastry professionals completing ICC’s program.

Restaurant Day 50

Semifredo from a studentEvery Restaurant Day features a different menu curated with never before seen desserts. For the 50th running of the Restaurant Day program this September, the ICC students, staff, deans, alumni and invited guests came together to celebrate the momentous occasion. This restaurant day was even more special than usual—it commemorated the dessert creations of all the previous classes, while showcasing our current pastry student’s hard work. From black sesame mille crêpes and port-poached fig tarts, to this lemon-raspberry semifreddo (pictured here) and everything in between, our guests left with their sweet tooth satisfied. Plus, students were excited to see special guest, ICC Dean of Pastry Arts, Chef Jacques Torres, at Restaurant Day to evaluate their desserts!

See our full gallery of photos from Restaurant Day 50, including all 8 original desserts created by our students, on our Facebook page here!

The Elements

The RD 50 classWhen you stop and think about all of the elements that go into creating a dessert, it can be daunting to figure out how the pros do it. Through our Professional Pastry Arts program, students work endlessly for 115 days to learn and develop all of the skills that they need to create their own original desserts. We sat down with our Director of Pastry Operations, Chef Jansen Chan, who is the mastermind behind Restaurant Day 50 and many other pastry projects at ICC to discuss the essential elements that are required to create a dessert. Check out these tips below to help you come up with your own sweet creations at home!

  • Textures are essential to dessert composition. It provides contrast and complexity, pleasing the palette. From a graham cracker crunch, to a fluffy mousse, variety in texture is everything.
  • Flavors that go together can create perfect harmony on a plate; however, flavors that do not make sense together can completely throw off the balance of a dessert. Example: acidic fruit, such as oranges, pair well with bitter, dark chocolate to highlight one another’s flavor. Combining delicate flavors, such as jasmine tea and elderflower, confuse the palette.
  • Temperature control is a lot harder than it sounds. Having hot and ice-cold elements are delightful to eat together, but managing the placement and service of such items takes good planning and execution.
  • Contrast brings together many different elements like texture, flavor, and temperature. Have you ever eaten molten chocolate cake with vanilla ice cream? Simple and divine, the warm, moist chocolate center is amazing against each cold, refreshing bite of ice cream. Pastry chefs strive to create these interesting contrasts daily.
  • Complexity and cohesiveness sound like different principles, but they actually effect one another, so they need to be carefully considered. If a dessert is well-conceived and exhibits the right amount of complexity, it will feel cohesive. It is important for desserts to have a certain amount of depth, while still looking like one idea on a plate.
  • Knife skills are often attributed to cooking, but they are also important for baking. How do you think a petit four has a perfect edge to it or an orange sûpreme is achieved with precision? It is because the pastry chef has achieved extraordinary knife skills.
  • Baking skills are second nature to pastry chefs, but these skills must first be taught. From day 1 of the Professional Pastry Arts program, students are first taught the essentials of baking, both theory and practical skills, in order to build any type of plated desserts.
  • Plate design and composition is the synthesis of all the elements on the plate. No matter the diversity of ingredients, the finished dessert needs to be appealing to the eye and manageable to consume. Understanding basic design principles, such as spacial organization and color use, takes practice and creativity.A student plating
  • Recipe writing and the science behind a recipe is no joke! Most people don’t realize that there are structural elements to a good recipe and steps for recipe development, but in ICC’s immersive Pastry Arts program, students learn to write and even create their very own recipes.
  • Time management is the final piece to the dessert creation puzzle. Whether it’s managing their mise en place over several days or placing the last garnish on a plate, students always need to know how to manage their time in order to perfectly execute their plate.

Recipe: Chai Panna Cotta

Article by ICC Alumni Swarna Koneru
2016 California Professional Culinary Arts Graduate

Recipes involving chai vary widely all over India  —the country of its origin. Now found throughout the US,  chai flavors are very popular with variations of cardamon, cinnamon, ginger, cloves, black pepper etc added into the mix.

These days, chai latte mixes are readily available in the super markets where you can steep into water or milk directly and enjoy. While a latte generally means a mixture of steamed milk and espresso, a chai latte is made with tea powder in a similar fashion.I happened to find this Dulce De Leche Chai Latte mix at a gourmet store and wanted to experiment with it.

I ended up creating a Chai Panna Cotta in a 2 oz shooters size for my guests at a recent party. I felt this size of desserts was good in that everyone can taste each kind, yet not eat a ton of dessert.

Preparation time
20 minutes, plus 4 hour setting time 
Serves
4-6 larger portions, or 18 2 oz portions
Serving Size
One 2 oz shooter
Calories Per Serving
Approximately 98 per serving
Difficulty
Easy
Ingredients:
1  cup whole milk
4 teaspoons plain gelatin powder (I used Knox)
2 1/2 cups heavy cream
3 Tablespoons Chai Latte Powder of your Choice (I used Mc Stevens Dulce De Leche Chai Latte)
½ cup  sugar
1/4 teaspoon vanilla extract (Optional)

Procedure:

Sprinkle Gelatin powder all over the milk in a small shallow bowl and allow gelatin to soften.

In a medium saucepan set over low heat, bring the heavy cream and sugar to a low boil, and add the Chai Latte Powder and mix until combined and simmer for about 5 minutes.

Remove cream mixture from heat and whisk in the vanilla and gelatin along with the milk until combined. Strain through a fine mesh sieve and transfer to your serving cups and refrigerate until set, at least 4 hours.


Tips:
  • You can serve this with a little whipped cream on top or some caramel sauce or chocolate sauce on top if you like.I sprinkled a few coffee flavored chocolate shavings on top.
  • If you do not like a lot of sweet, reduce the amount of sugar you add, sugar content in the mixes can vary by brand so first add the chai latte powder and then adjust your sugar content accordingly.
  • If you do not have access to the chai latte powder, you can use your homemade masala chai mix as well.
  • When sprinkling the gelatin do not dump it in one place in the milk else it will not soften completely and get lumpy.

 

What is your favorite flavor combo with Chai? Let me know what you think!


Connect with Swarna on https://prathimakoneru.com as well as Pinterest and Facebook