Who Will Tread the ‘Bread Carpet’ This Fall? The Bread Oscars are Back in NYC & You Can Enter!

After a stunning debut in the fall, the Tiptree World Bread Awards return to New York City for 2019, to celebrate the very best American bread bakers and the International Culinary Center is proud to return as the Educational Partner for the Awards. For only the second time in the United States, bread bakers in America will have the opportunity to enter their breads to compete and stake their claim alongside some of the best breads in the world.

David ShalamIn 2018, the Awards’ very first year, two ICC alumni received awards for their excellent submissions in the categories of baguettes and bagels. Clémence Danko, Founder of Choc O Pain French Bakery in Jersey City, and a 2010 graduate of the Art of International Bread Baking Program, brought home the American Bakers Association Baguette Award for her Baguette Traditionelle. David Shalam, 2011 graduate of the Professional Pastry Arts program and Founder/Head Baker of Heritage Bakers in Glen Cove, New York, took home the Bagel Award for his signature Heritage Bagel.

Inspired by the UK Awards, the top annual competition for professional bakers in the United Kingdom, the USA Awards took off like a rocket – loaves were received from all round the country on the Judging Day in Dumbo, Brooklyn last October.

This year, ICC’s very own Chef Jansen Chan, Director of Pastry Operations, will again bring his expertise and knowledge to the judging panel which features a line-up of New York’s food aristocracy, including legendary Brooklyn baker and James Beard Foundation Award nominee Zachary Golper of Bien Cuit, Dana Cowin, renowned food editor, New York’s top foodie instagrammer Alexa Matthews, of EatingNYC, Claudia Sanchez, Editor, Edible Queens, Scott Goodfellow, Joint Managing Director, Tiptree and David and Tracey Zabar of Zabars.

breadChef Jansen, who worked in restaurants for nearly 15 years, knows the importance of integrating a dedicated bread program into your restaurant. As one of the first bites a diner will experience, he worked for years to cultivate the bread programs in restaurants, and eventually carried this experience to overseeing the Art of International Bread Baking program at ICC which trains the next generation of bread bakers.

When asked about his top tips for award winning hopefuls, Chef Jansen remarked that, “presentation [is key]! There are lots of great tasting products out there, but many bakers forget the first impact of the visual. It’s how we first consume. Make sure to consider the final look of the product by making it look attractive and distinct – it’s a competition and every bit counts.”  Read more of Chef Jansen’s top judging tips on the World Bread Awards blog here!

Celemence DankoFor the second year in a row, ICC is calling all bread bakers in our community—especially ICC alumni—to enter their exciting, and delicious, work for the 2019 Awards which includes 14 categories, from sourdough to baguettes, gluten-free, whole wheat and more. Judging Day will take place on Tuesday October 29, 2019 where a top panel of 40 judges will taste their way through all the entries. This year, the entry fee also includes a ticket to the fabulous Awards evening at Landmark on the Park on Wednesday October 30, 2019 to mingle with VIPs of the press, baking and foodie world.

Why enter? In addition to the $1000 cash prize for the Overall Winner of the awards, it’s important to raise awareness of the craft. Chef Jansen shared, “most people enjoy bread without considering the dedication and commitment to the art of bread making. Championing your great work by entering helps build a better build bread community and understanding of your talent.”

Submit your entry for the Tiptree World Bread Awards, supported by American Bakers Association, before Monday, September 30th, 2019! Click here for more information on the entry rules.

About the Event Partners:

Tiptree is headline sponsor of the World Bread Awards USA. The first Tiptree preserves were made in 1885 and Tiptree jams and preserves are now sold across the world, many of them made with fruit still grown on their farms in Essex www.tiptree.com

Tiptree has always had strong links with the USA. Scott Goodfellow, Wilkin & Sons Joint Managing Director commented, “C. J. Wilkin, the son of our founder, toured several states back in the 1890s, to learn about fruit growing and jam making. New York City has a global reputation for excellent food, so it makes the perfect spot for the overseas Tiptree World Bread Awards. We are very much looking forward to discovering the world of artisan bread that is available across the USA.”

panelists

What The Experts Say About Today’s Trends in Wine

While rich with history and often rooted in ancient tradition, the wine industry is anything but static. This multi-billion dollar business continues to change, challenging established, and aspiring, wine professionals to stay on the cutting edge of today’s trends and rising regions.

That’s why, at the beginning of May, we sat down with Master Sommelier, Alexander LaPratt—Beverage Director & Co-Owner of Atrium DUMBO and Beasts & Bottles, as well as instructor in ICC’s Intensive Sommelier Training program—and Advanced Sommelier, Theo Lieberman—Head Sommelier at Compagnie des Vins Surnaturels—to explore the ever evolving trends creating a buzz in the wine industry for our latest Off the Vine panel!

Read below to see what trends our experts have been following this year and how you can utilize the their popularity to your advantage on the floor, in sales, and more!

Orange Wine Arrived and Never Left

orange wine“Skin-fermented,” “unconventional,” “macerated,” or even “off-white”—whatever you call them, orange wines are here to stay. Orange wines have been around for over 5,000 years in the nation of Georgia and picked up popularity in the US roughly a decade ago. Today, they’ve remained “trendy” due to their obscurity and unpredictability.

While the topic of orange wine vehemently divides the world of wine into those that “love” or “hate” them, our experts agree—it’s here to stay. But buyers beware—one orange wine can be very different from another because of the complex way that terroir and aging influence each bottle.

Unexpected Wine in NYC's Backyard

In 2018, wine production reached record highs of almost 300 million hectolitres—the equivalent of 7.7 billion gallons. While countries like Italy, France and Spain were the dominant producers, little known wine producing regions across the globe were working diligently to prove their quality.

In NYC’s own backyard, the Finger Lakes region in upstate New York is putting the state on the map as one of America’s best for wine. Even though the area experiences bitter winters, varietals like Riesling and Pinot Noir can still flourish, which happen to be the regions best wines!

ENGLAND PRODUCES WINE?!

sparklingUnless you were producing Champagne, bubbles in wine were not always wanted. It often happened by accident in the 17th century when regulating temperatures was difficult and accidental bubbles would appear from re-fermentation.

Now, people can’t get enough of sparkling wine. Producers across the world are rushing to create their own signature style, with emerging regions like England standing out from the crowd. With climate change impacting France’s iconic Champagne region, people are looking to England as warming temperatures positively impact England’s ability to grow grapes—which was almost unthinkable 20 years ago. According to estimates, the English wine region has grown to more than 500 vineyards today, with growth estimated to make the region larger than Champagne.

OFF THE VINE, brought to you by the Intensive Sommelier Training program at ICC, is a series of tastings, discussion panels and networking events designed to support wine professionals in the beverage industry. Each event is designed to provide education, information and the opportunity to connect with industry experts in a collaborative setting.

References:

“Climate Change Gives English Winemakers ‘Harvest of the Century’.” NBCNews.com, NBCUniversal News Group, www.nbcnews.com/news/world/climate-change-makes-england-s-vineyards-perfect-sparkling-wine-n962606.

“English Sparkling.” Vivino, www.vivino.com/wine-styles/english-sparkling.

Karlsson, Per and Britt. “Record Global Wine Harvest In 2018, Stable Consumption.” Forbes, Forbes Magazine, 14 Apr. 2019, www.forbes.com/sites/karlsson/2019/04/14/record-global-wine-harvest-in-2018-stable-consumption/#4b728a40266b.

McCoy, Elin. “Orange Wine Has Finally Arrived. Here Are Eight Bottles to Buy.” Bloomberg.com, Bloomberg, 2016, www.bloomberg.com/news/articles/2016-06-15/orange-wine-has-finally-arrived-here-are-seven-bottles-to-buy.

McKirdy, Tim. “8 Questions About Orange Wine You’re Too Embarrassed to Ask.” VinePair, 30 Aug. 2018, vinepair.com/articles/orange-wine-guide/.

Ross, Marissa A. “‘Orange Wine’ Needs to Go Away-Hear Me Out.” Bon Appétit, Bon Appétit, 20 Mar. 2018, www.bonappetit.com/story/orange-wine-skin-contact.

Wallace, Siobhan. “How Sparkling Wine Is Made.” Wine Enthusiast Magazine, 14 May 2019, www.winemag.com/2019/05/14/how-sparkling-wine-made/.

“Why New York Is Becoming One of America’s Best States for Wine Lovers.” Travel + Leisure, www.travelandleisure.com/food-drink/wine/new-york-finger-lakes-wine-region.

chef pablo

Pop Up Dinner with Chef Pablo Ranea

Every year, after celebrating the end of the harvest season in their native Mendoza, Chef & Sommelier Pablo Ranea and Architect Alejandro Cohen pack their bags full of spices, unique ingredients and the spirit of adventure in search of inspiring experiences and challenges.

Together, they bring their unique take on food pairings and gastronomy to cities around the world. Whether the dinner event is held in a private garden or a culinary school, their carefully designed menus showcase Latin America’s best cooking techniques and recipes paired with exquisite wines.

This one-of-a kind experience is the result of Pablo’s well-tested recipes gathered through his extensive travels in cities and countries including San Francisco, New York, Chicago, Washington DC, Los Angeles, Hong Kong, Finland, France, Denmark, Dominican Republic and Peru.

Friends gather around a table with a common desire to enjoy a memorable experience of aromas, tastes and textures of Argentinian and Latin American cooking, wines and history. Pablo and Alejandro arrive with a traveling kitchen of gastronomic marvels and the unique Argentinian wines not found in America.  Prepare for an adventure of the senses.

GET A TASTE OF ARGENTINA IN NYC

Pop Up Dinner with Pablo Ranea
Friday, June 28th | 7:30pm
International Culinary Center
28 Crosby Street
On Friday, June 28th, Chef Pablo & Alejandro return to New York City to present a six course dinner paired with 10 premium Argentinian wines at the International Culinary Center in SoHo. This will be the first time one of their pop up dinners will be open to the public.

PLATED DISHFor this dinner, Chef Pablo will prepare some of his iconic dishes such as Octopus chicharron with green chimichurri, as well as butternut squash, truffle and shrimp raviolis. He will also bring exotic flavors such as Lucuma artisan ice cream with Argentinian dulce de leche to the table.

During the dinner, Pablo—who is also a Sommelier—will introduce specially paired wines like Susana Balbo Brioso white blend (the number one white blend of Argentina); Malbecs from the best districts of Mendoza like Gauchezco Oro Appellation Gualtallary; Tinto Negro Limestone Block and Andillian by Lacoste de Los Andes.

In addition, LOS BUENDIA—a marvelous Bolero band from Mendoza—will fly to NYC to perform during the event.

They invite you to book an unforgettable experience. Attendance is by reservation and pre-payment only. Tickets are $195 and can be purchased here. For reservation questions, please email chefpabloranea@gmail.com for more details.

Please note, this is a dinner format (not a class) and seating will be communal like a big Italian family.

Guests with allergies or dietary restrictions will need to provide notice at least 10 days in advance.

commencement ceremony

Award-Winning Chef & Philanthropist, Aarón Sánchez, Announced As 2019 Commencement Keynote Speaker

Plus, Outstanding Alumni Award winners named & hundreds of graduates celebrated at Carnegie Hall this June!

aaron sanchezAarón Sánchez, founder of the Aarón Sánchez Scholarship Fund—whose diligent philanthropic work has helped fund culinary education in the Latin community since 2016—will deliver the Keynote Address at the International Culinary Center (ICC) 2019 Commencement Ceremony on Sunday, June 2nd at 2pm. The annual ceremony, held once again at New York City’s iconic Carnegie Hall in the Stern Auditorium/Perelman Stage, will celebrate students who have completed ICC’s professional programs between June 2018 and May 2019.

graduatesSánchez—who provides full culinary scholarships to ICC and mentorship to recipients through his foundation—will address hundreds of graduates across all disciplines, in addition to their family and friends, at Commencement next month. Students who have completed the Professional Culinary Arts, Pastry Arts, Cake Techniques & Design, Art of International Bread Baking and Intensive Sommelier Training programs will don their pressed-white coats and sharp toques, or Certified Sommelier pins, as they walk across the stage at Carnegie Hall.

In addition to celebrating the school’s newest graduates, each year ICC honors alumni who excel in their field of study in a series of Outstanding Alumni Awards. The awards were created in 1997, 13 years after the school’s founding as The French Culinary Institute, by Founder Dorothy Cann Hamilton. This year’s recipients will become the 21st award-winning class and are preceded by other notable recipients such as Dan Barber, Christina Tosi, David Chang, Joshua Skenes, Susanna Yoon, Angie Mar, Jeremiah Stone and Fabian Von Hauske.

outstanding alumni winners

Five alumni will be recognized as the 2019 Outstanding Alumni Award winners at Carnegie Hall this year. Scott Tacinelli, Chef/Co-Owner of Don Angie, will receive the award for Excellence in Culinary Arts and shares, “As a career changer, ICC gave me the confidence and foundation necessary to be successful in the culinary world.” The award for Excellence in Pastry Arts will go to Zoë Kanan, Head Baker of Simon & The Whale and The Studio. “It’s such an honor to have my achievements recognized by the institution that served as my gateway to the culinary world,” says Zoë. Recipient of the award for Excellence in Media, Ben Mims—Cooking Columnist for The Los Angeles Times, credits his education and instructors at ICC for “providing a foundation of knowledge that has helped me navigate the waters of our ever-changing business.” The awards will also recognize graduates in the beverage industry including Vanessa Da Silva, Sommelier at Ninety Acres, and Matt Monahan, Co-Founder/CEO of Other Half Brewing Company, who receive awards for Outstanding Sommelier and Excellence in Entrepreneurship respectively.

Guests who wish to join the Commencement Ceremony can purchase tickets through the Carnegie Hall Box Office.
Tickets: $20
www.carnegiehall.org | CarnegieCharge 212-247-7800 | Box Office at 57th Street and 7th Avenue

bugible

Bugible: How & Why We Eat Bugs

Explore the flavor profiles of the food of the future—bugs! With the world’s population expected to reach 9 billion by 2050, we’ll need to find sustainable ways to deliver nutritious food to our growing population. Bugs are not only a solution to this problem, but are also one of the more provocative food sources in discussion.

There’s a reason why 80% of the world’s countries have been eating bugs for thousands of years. Bugs come out ahead of traditional live stock, like beef, in any food enviro-metric—gallons of water, Co2 equivalents of greenhouse gases, acres of land, feed-conversion-ration comparisons and more.

ICC is excited to be hosting Aly Moore founder of Bugible—a blog about the world of edible insects—and EatBugsEvents.com for an insightful presentation and tasting about how and why we eat bugs. Opening a dialogue about how what we eat impacts our bodies and our environment, we’ll examine the challenges faced by entrepreneurs, discuss how to overcome the stigma surrounding edible bugs and encourage chefs of the next generation to have an open mind to the opportunities that tasty critters offer. Join us for a guided tasting on Wednesday, June 5th from 3:30-5pm to explore the delicate flavor profiles of critters like grasshoppers and bamboo worms.

JOURNEY THROUGH THE WORLD OF ENTOMOPHAGY

Wednesday, June 5th | 3:30-5:00pm
International Culinary Center
462 Broadway, 2nd Floor Theater

About Aly Moore

aly mooreAfter studying public health at Yale University, Aly Moore searched for a way to address the challenges to feed our growing sustainably and nutritiously feed our growing population. She started Bugible.com (blog) to support the growing insect agriculture industry and slowly grew a cult following on Instagram. To reach broader audiences, Eat Bugs Events was formed as an Aladdin’s den of unique educational events like Bug & Wine Pairings, Bug Dinners & Bug Cooking Classes. Since, Bugible has become the leading media & PR brand for the insect agriculture industry, appearing on Netflix’s Bill Nye, Food & Wine, Forbes, & others. Today, Bugible focuses on continuing to spread awareness about other sustainable and nutritious potential of bugs through collaborations with institutions of all kinds from the International Culinary Center, Yale University, Parks & Recreation Districts, or even the Girl Scouts of America.

She is heavily involved in growing the industry’s trade organization – The North American Coalition for Insect Agriculture (NACIA). Learn more here. 

james beard awards

Six ICC Alumni Win Big at 2019 James Beard Awards!

This year, ICC alumni and Dean David Kinch received a staggering 33 semifinalist nominations for the the 2019 James Beard Awards—known best as the “Oscars of the Food World”—recognizing their talent and dedication to their craft. Last night, while Hollywood A-listers flaunted fabulous fashions at the Met Gala, the who’s who of food & beverage gathered at the Lyric Opera of Chicago for the year’s most prestigious award ceremony in the culinary industry. The 3,500-seat theater full of hopefuls and their guests included 15 ICC alumni, plus our dean, waiting to hear if they’d win big this year. Alumni chefs and restaurant owners were not only present as finalists—Elena Besser, Professional Culinary Arts ’16, showed off her food media chops as one of the red carpet co-hosts for the foundation. Check out her coverage on the live feed, which garnered over 1.5 million views!

Steven Cook, co-owner of CookNSolo Restaurants, alongside his business partner Michael Solomonov, won the award for Outstanding Restaurant for the famed Zahav in Philadelphia. Cook, a graduate of our Culinary Arts program in 2000, was awarded ICC’s Outstanding Alumni Award for Excellence in Entrepreneurship last year for his achievement as one of the country’s most successful restaurateurs, overseeing a mini-empire in New York & Philadelphia.

Ashley Christensen, graduate of ICC’s Sous Vide Intensive program, took home the evenings top honors, receiving the award for Outstanding Chef. If you’re looking to amp up your Sous Vide skills just as Chef Christensen did in 2012, check out our revamped 2-day Sous Vide Intensive course here.

Other winners from last night’s celebrations included Kelly Jeun, Co-Executive Chef of Frasca Food and Wine in Colorado, which received the award for Outstanding Service. One of NYC’s hottest restaurants Atomix, where our Intensive Sommelier Training graduate—Jhonel Faelnar—is an integral part of the tight-knit team as Wine Director, received the award for Restaurant Design for 75 Seats and Under. Even before Monday’s awards ceremony, two ICC alumni went home as winners at the Media Awards on April 26th. David Chang received the award for Outstanding Reporting for his coverage of the 2018 PyeongChang Winter Olympics, while Nick Fauchald, co-author of the book Cocktail Codex received the award for Book of the Year

Congratulations to the 6 ICC alumni who were bestowed with a coveted James Beard Award this year! Read below for more information on our winners.

2019 James Beard Foundation Restaurant & Chef Awards

Outstanding Chef

Ashley Christensen, Poole’s Diner, Raleigh, NC [Sous Vide Intensive ’12]

Outstanding Restaurant

Zahav, Philadelphia, PA [Steven Cook, Co-Owner of Zahav, Culinary Arts ’00]

Outstanding Service

Frasca Food and Wine, Boulder, CO [Kelly Jeun, Co Executive Chef, Italian Culinary Experience ’07]

2019 James Beard Foundation Book Awards

Book Of The Year

Cocktail Codex, Alex Day, Nick Fauchald [Culinary Arts ’04], and David Kaplan (Ten Speed Press)

2019 James Beard Foundation Broadcast Media Awards

Outstanding Reporting

Deep Dive and Food for Thought, 2018 PyeongChang Winter OlympicsDavid Chang [Culinary Arts ’01], Airs on: NBC, NBCSN

Want to check out David Chang’s reporting at last year’s Olympics? Watch it here on NBC’s archive of the Olympics!

2019 James Beard Foundation Outstanding Restaurant Design Awards

75 Seats and Under

Firm: Studio Writers, Project: Atomix, [Jhonel Faelnar, Wine Director of Atomix, Intensive Sommelier Training ’13]

panelists

Understanding Your Business Foodprint

This month, in celebration of Earth Day in April, and as a part of our Understanding Your ‘Foodprint’ series, our latest installment of Business Bites: Reaping the Benefits of Going Green discussed ethical choices to reduce your bottom line, while positively impacting the environment, with a panel of experts from chefs and restaurateurs to CEO’s of environmental organizations and consultants for food business owners.

Below, check out what we learned from our panelists about taking the steps to change your business practices to become more sustainable, and move towards a zero waste model!

LEARN FROM OTHERS

Our moderator Alek Marfisi, Owner of Upwind Strategies and instructor in ICC’s Culinary Entrepreneurship program, was joined by Christina Mitchell Grace, CEO of Foodprint Group; John Oppermann, Executive Director of Earth Day Initiative; Naama Tamir, Co-Founder of Lighthouse Lighthouse Outpost; and Michael Chernow, Co-Founder of The Meatball Shop & Founder of Seamore’s. While their respective businesses interact with sustainable practices on varying levels, they are all passionately advocating for others in the food industry to make choices that will lessen our impact on the environment. Not only did our audience learn a lot from our panelists, but the panelists shared many helpful tips with each other, furthering the idea that a supportive community is important to fostering change.

TACKLE ONE THING

In today’s world, sustainability should be a driving factor for businesses. The word itself is defined by the avoidance of resource depletion in order to maintain an ecological balance. It is essentially what business owners should be doing every day. But often times, business owners are overwhelmed by the idea of just running their business, let alone trying to minimize their environmental impact. So our main piece of advice for getting started, just do one thing first!

Waste Diversion

Naama, whose restaurant Lighthouse Brooklyn is focused on sustainability in every aspect, created a waste system with multiple different streams. By diverting the streams to the appropriate places, like composting and creating bio-diesel with the organic waste or donating oyster shells to the Billion Oyster Project, her restaurant can make a significant impact on what ends up in landfills. Her restaurant even takes it a step further by partnering with companies to use empty wine bottles for candles and uses the corks to make tops for food jars. Lighthouse Brooklyn is a great example of how everything can serve multiple purposes and that it is possible to become zero waste in the food space.

Organize Your Space & Educate Your Team

While becoming a zero waste restaurant or food business is completely doable, it can be challenging to get there without the right tools—that’s where Christina Mitchell Grace comes in. Her company, Food Print Group, helps food and hospitality organizations design zero waste into their buildings, kitchens and front of house processes. Becoming zero waste starts from the beginning of the source, so by creating an efficient kitchen and work space, training your staff and educating your customers, it will automatically become simpler to divert waste from landfills and source separate your organics from trash.

Use Sustainably Sourced Ingredients

Others, like Michael Chernow, tackle sustainability through ingredient sourcing. The fish at his restaurant Seamore’s is 100% sustainable, sourced as close to home as possible and offered at an accessible price point. Seamore’s whole philosophy is founded on the idea introducing underutilized, undervalued local species of fish to their customers in healthy and tasty ways. By doing so, they’re working to protect our oceans from becoming depleted and educating others to keep our oceans healthy for future generations.

If seafood is not a key focus of your menu, focusing on local ingredients can be. By using ingredients that don’t have to travel far, it can cut carbon footprints by reducing long-distance transportation and will put your dollars into your local economy.

Advocate With Your Dollars

To bring the conversation together, John Oppermann discussed how Earth Day Initiative educates businesses on energy efficiency and building brand awareness around your sustainability practices. While it may be too costly to install solar panels, or even unrealistic if your building doesn’t allow it, you can actually purchase renewable energy through regular energy providers. By voting with your dollars, you’re letting your local city officials know that clean energy is important and making your voice heard in a simple way.

THE ULTIMATE GOAL: ZERO WASTE

There are big questions that need to be addressed to strategize for a future that minimizes, or hopefully eliminates, the 24,000 tons of wasted materials produced in NYC each day. Questions like, “what if every building had a compost program,” or “what if all single use coffee cups were replaced with reusable mugs?” But, one of the first steps that businesses can take to reduce this massive amount of waste is to assess opportunities for waste reduction through source separation. A surprising amount of “trash” is actually organic waste that can be composted or recycled, which will eventually get you to the ultimate zero waste goal. Taking an audit of your waste will help you identify this.

Even though zero waste is the ultimate goal, there are smaller practices that you can put into place to help you integrate sustainability into your business. Practices like buying local, using the entire ingredient, and buying in bulk are simple changes that can be made quickly. If you want even more resources to go green, check out our Business Bites Resources article here.

ABOUT BUSINESS BITES

The BUSINESS BITES, brought to you by the Culinary Entrepreneurship program at ICC, is a series of workshops, discussion panels, networking events and resources designed to support entrepreneurs in the food industry.

Business Bites Resources: 4 Ways To Bring Sustainability To Your Kitchen

In celebration of Earth Day this month, and as a part of our Understanding Your ‘Foodprint’ series, our latest installment of Business Bites: Reaping the Benefits of Going Green discussed the economic rewards of making ethical & sustainable choices for your restaurant or food business.

In a passionate discussion led by moderator Alek Marfisi (Owner of Upwind Strategies & ICC Culinary Entrepreneurship instructor), panelists Christina Mitchell Grace (CEO of Foodprint Group), John Oppermann (Executive Director of Earth Day Initiative), Naama Tamir (Co-Founder of Lighthouse Lighthouse Outpost), and Michael Chernow (Co-Founder of The Meatball Shop & Founder of Seamore’s) shared their experiences running, or working with, restaurants & food businesses promoting sustainable, zero waste practices. Read our full recap of the conversation here.

You won’t be able to change everything all at once. Instead use these tips and resources to help you get started by doing one or two things differently today. Whether you’re a food business owner, chef or home cook, making small changes to your foodprint can have large impacts on the environment. Check them out below!

For The Food Business Owner

Sustainable practices aren’t limited to just the kitchen—incorporating them into every facet of your business can not only reduce waste and help to save money, but also educates your customers on how their actions impact the environment as well. Share your stories with your audience and they’ll reward you by becoming loyal customers.

This infographic from the NYC Department of Sanitation will help introduce you to the world of efficiency, creating a more usable space for your business, which will lead to less waste. Download their full Zero Waste Design Guidelines here or evaluate how much waste you generate by using their calculator here.

This organization provides organic collection solutions for small food businesses including in-house education to make composting easy, reduce waste & recycling costs, and guide you in edible food rescue opportunities.

Carbon Credit Capital helps to calculate your company’s emissions and find solutions for going carbon neutral.

Whether you’re looking for local compost drop offs or shopping for recycled kitchen appliances, Big Reuse has you covered.

For the Chef

As a chef, being focused on sustainability isn’t just trendy, it’s imperative. Chefs have an opportunity to advocate for better practices in our food systems and educate their customers through the food that they cook. In addition to the positive marketing & storytelling for your brand, incorporating sustainable practices can help to cut costs as well.

It’s no secret that chef’s enjoy cooking with what’s in season, and this seasonal food guide from FoodPrint.org allows you to search by your location and time of year to see what’s available near you! By choosing ingredients that are local, your food dollar goes directly to farmers and you eliminate environmental damage caused by shipping foods thousands of miles.

According to the Sustainable Restaurant Association, 90% of the world’s fish stocks are either fully or over-exploited. Help to recover the world’s oceans by diversifying the fish that you use and educate your customers on making the right choice.

Meat has long been at the center of the plate, but by making vegetables more appealing and using descriptive words on your menus, you can draw attention away from resource-consuming meat.

ICC special guest panelist Naama Tamir is the owner of Lighthouse Brooklyn and Lighthouse Outpost. Her restaurants go beyond farm-to-table dining, embracing sustainability in everything they do. At Lighthouse, everything has multiple uses. They recycle, compost, and collaborate with other green-oriented businesses to grow, improve and educate their staff, guests and community. From recycling empty wine bottles into candles for the restaurant and turning cooking oil into bio diesel, to returning oyster shells to the Billion Oyster Project, everything is re-purposed into a new life. Places like Industrial/Organic are taking it to the next level, deriving organic chemicals and ingredients from food waste—simultaneously diverting food waste from landfills and creating recycled home & personal care products, dietary supplements and more.

For the Home Cook

If you live in NYC, you know that the NYC Department of Sanitation requires all residents to recycle, so you’re already on the right path to decreasing your carbon footprint. Here are a few small steps you can take to bring sustainability into your kitchen, and home!

This short, fun quiz explores what your foodprint is, introducing the subject of sustainability and educates you on your carbon footprint based off of your food habits. They’ll provide you with tips at the end that you can apply to improve your foodprint.

While most chefs are trained to practice whole-ingredient cooking, it can be more difficult to do so at home without the proper education. Reducing food waste as you cook at home not only saves you money, it provides a better tasting product while also making small positive changes on the environment.

As we approach the 50th anniversary of Earth Day in 2020, The Earth Day Initiative has launched their Do Just 1 Thing campaign to encourage people to switch to clean energy whether for their residential or business dwelling.

60,000 plastic bags are used every 5 seconds in the US, so it’s time to start doing your part. Carry a reusable tote that you can put groceries and any other purchased items into instead of a single use plastic bag. Start now because by March 2020, NYC will have officially banned single use plastic bags.

ABOUT BUSINESS BITES

The BUSINESS BITES, brought to you by the Culinary Entrepreneurship program at ICC, is a series of workshops, discussion panels, networking events and resources designed to support entrepreneurs in the food industry.

conchas

Conchas: Mexican Sweet Bread Recipe

conchasPan Dulce is a staple in Mexican culture and cuisine. Though they can be eaten at any time of the day as a snack or meal, they are typically enjoyed at breakfast. Some people estimate that there are over 2,000 varieties, but the most popular and widely-known is conchas!

In Spanish, concha translates to shell, so it makes sense that this sweet, softly baked bread is named after it’s fun shape. This Cinco de Mayo, we’re honoring the Mexican holiday by sharing how our Director of Pastry, Chef Jansen Chan, makes them in the kitchens of ICC. Check out the recipe below!

We’re also excited to announce our collaboration with Ice & Vice for the Hester Street Fair @FoodBabyNY Food Fest 2 on Cinco de Mayo! Chef Jansen and Ice & Vice are working together to create an exclusive treat, Food Baby Conchitas (a Concha Ice Cream Sandwich) in two signature flavors—Rasperry Concha with Peanut Butter Fluff & Concord Grape Ice Cream, plus a Black & White Coffee Concha with Horchata Ice Cream. The street fair is free to all, but you can register here for tickets.

Can’t wait to go to the street fair to try this signature, exclusive item? Be sure to check our Instagram on Thursday, May 2nd for details on how you can win 2 seats in our Mexican Cooking Class this August! All you’ll have to do is snap a photo of your Food Baby Conchita at the Hester Street Fair this Sunday and post to your Instagram. Stay tuned!

DOUGH INGREDIENTS:

  • 225 g. flour, all-purpose
  • 225 g. flour, bread
  • 70 g. sugar
  • 1 t. salt
  • 20 g. fresh yeast or (10 g. dried yeast*)
  • 60 g. milk
  • 200 g. (about 4) eggs
  • 170 g. butter, softened
  • Additional sugar, for dipping

PROCEDURE:

  1. Place all ingredients*, except butter, in a stand mixer with a dough hook attachment. Mix at a low speed until combined. Increase the speed to medium and continue to mix until gluten develops.
  2. Slowly add butter to the dough, and allow to incorporate fully.
  3. Transfer the dough into a greased bowl and wrap in plastic wrap well.
  4. Allow to ferment at room temperature for 2-3 hours or overnight in the refrigerator.
  5. Place the dough on a flour work surface and punch down to deflate the dough.
  6. Portion the dough into 80g pieces.
  7. Roll each portion into a round and flatten.
  8. Place directly on a parchment-lined tray, allowing 2-3 inches around for expansion.
  9. Divide the crust dough into 28 g. portions. (See instructions to make crust dough below).
  10. Pat crust into 3” circles and place directly on top of each round.
  11. Flour each cutter and gently stamp to create an impression.
  12. Cover the tray and allow to proof for 2-3 hours in a warm spot, or until double in size.
  13. Preheat the oven to 375°F
  14. Bake for 12-15 mins. or until golden brown.
  15. Remove from oven and allow to cool for 5 mins.
  16. Roll in a bowl of sugar while warm.

*if using dried yeast, first dissolve in milk.

CRUST INGREDIENTS:

  • 100 g. sugar
  • 112 g. butter, softened
  • ¼ t. salt
  • ½ t. vanilla
  • 120 g. flour, all-purpose*

PROCEDURE:

  1. In a stand mixer with a paddle attachment, cream butter and sugar together until light and fluffy.
  2. Add salt and vanilla.
  3. Add flour and allow to mix until just incorporated.
  4. Wrap the dough and allow to rest for at least 30 mins. or overnight, chilled. If the dough sits overnight, remove from refrigerator at least 30 mins. prior to use.

*for chocolate crust, substitute 20 g. of cocoa for flour

ICC In The News: Highlights from April 2019

ICC In The News provides monthly highlights from articles published around the world that feature alumni, deans, faculty and more within the ICC community. Stories of our 15,000+ alumni network and their successes are continuously popping up across various prestigious publications. Below, we have brought together some of our favorites from April 2019, aimed to keep you connected with our community and inspire readers to #LoveWhatYouDo in the kitchen and beyond.

jacques pepin
WASHINGTON POST
Jacques Pépin: Eggs are on the outs again. To me, they’ll always be perfect.

Dean Jacques Pépin grew up in a time where resources were scarce—because of this, and throughout his 70 year career, he’s always appreciated and loved eggs. Read his beautiful tribute to the simple, yet elegant, ingredient in the Washington Post here.

Over the last few decades, our Dean of Pastry Arts, Chef Emily Luchetti helped to define what great pastry in America means. In this episode of the new Pastry Arts Magazine podcast, hear from the expert on the process of writing multiple books, where she draws inspiration for new dishes & more!

At the end of March, 20 high school students cooked their hearts out in our kitchens for the CCAP Competition for Scholarships. CCAP is an organization that has helped impact 15,000+ students annually since 1990 through their culinary programs. Learn more about them and watch a recap of the competition on NY1 here.

Nowadays, almost everyone knows what Buzzfeed’s Tasty is, but do you really know who’s behind the camera? Two of the shows stars, Alexis deBoschnek and Rie McClenny, were trained at ICC and now use their culinary talents daily in the Buzzfeed test kitchens. Read about their stories in LA Weekly’s article.

The popular NYC gastro-bar Existing Conditions didn’t just open out of thin air–ICC Dean and owner of the bar Dave Arnold put in years of hard work to perfect his talents. Read more about his unusual techniques in Wine Enthusiast here.

Nicole Centeno
FORBES
One Mom’s Rollercoaster Startup Journey Through Life’s Struggles To Success

The idea for Splendid Spoon was born when Nicole Centeno, ICC alumna and founder of Splendid Spoon, came up with the idea for her company on the quest to know what she was eating. It wasn’t an easy road, but now Centeno and her team bring in over $1 million a month in revenue. Read about how she did it in Forbes here.

The judging for the world’s most important olive oil competition is set to begin May 5 at the International Culinary Center in New York. Interested in attending or learning more? Check out The Olive Oil Time’s article on the 7th Annual NYIOOC World Olive Oil Competition here.

Fabian Von Hauske
VILCEK
Vilcek Prize for Creative Promise in Culinary Arts

Congratulations to Professional Culinary and Pastry Arts graduate Fabián von Hauske Valtierra of Contra, Wildair NYC & Una Pizza Napoletana! He was awarded the The Vilcek Foundation award for Creative Promise in Culinary Arts. Read about his inspiring story here or watch his video here.

Jacques Torres—ICC Dean of Pastry Arts and judge on Netflix’s Nailed It!—sat down with Inc. to share his story as one of the world’s foremost chocolatiers. Learn how he turned an abandoned factory in Brooklyn into his chocolate empire!

Daniel Gritzer learned the secrets to Soufflé from our Dean, Jacques Pépin. Read what he learned from the master in Serious Eats here.

Congrats to ’04 Professional Pastry Arts grad Melissa Weller! She’s joining the team at High St NYC as the newest partner. Check out her creations like a buttermilk-iced cinnamon-cardamom roll and a black-sesame kouign-amann. Read more in her Grub Street feature.

Ben Mims, Professional Culinary Arts ’08, is one of The LA Times brand new, in house chefs and cooking columnists. Check out the brand new food section of The LA Times for recipes, dining coverage & more!

Looking for sweet some career advice from a pro? Look no further than ICC Guest Master Pastry Chef, Ron Ben-Israel! Listen to him on Pastry Arts Magazine’s podcast and get inspired for your future career here.

zoe kanan
EATER
The Eater Young Guns Class of ’19

Congratulations to 2010 Professional Pastry Arts graduate Zoë Kanan for being awarded one of Eater’s Young Guns of 2019! She is the Head Baker AND Pastry Chef of Freehand New York’s restaurant Simon & The Whale, and was chosen for this award out of 500+ nominees for shaping the future of dining in America. Read more about her and the award in Eater here.

Brett Suzuki, ICC grad, grew up in Chicago before moving to Tokyo and NYC. All of these experiences helped to influence his tacos at the newly opened Arigato Market in Chicago. Check it out here in the Chicago Tribune.

Culinary graduate & Thai-born former restaurateur Chutatip Suntaranon has been cooking for her Queen Village neighbors for years. My-Le Vuong, a Vietnamese-born veteran restaurant manager moved in across the street from Suntaranon years ago. After years of friendship, they decided to open Kalaya, a homey, 30-seat BYOB. Check it out in Philly online here.

ICC Alumna Stephanie “Chefanie” Nass, partnered with Tod’s! Read about the exciting partnership and collection in Coveteur here.

stone barns
WASHINGTON POST
This New York restaurant sets the standard for American fine dining

ICC Alumnus & famed chef Dan Barber is no stranger to anyone in the culinary industry. Read this article in the Washington Post about how his restaurant, Blue Hill at Stone Barns, sets the standard for fine-dining in America.

How do you save family recipes when your grandmother never writes them down? Anna Francese Gass, ICC Professional Culinary Arts alumna, tackles this culinary conundrum in her new cookbook, Heirloom Kitchen: Heritage Recipes and Family Stories from the Tables of Immigrant Women. Listen to her on Cherry Bombe’s podcast, and come meet her on May 30th at ICC.

Ed McFarland, Professional Culinary Arts grad, opened Ed’s Lobster Bar in 2007. The most popular items from his SoHo menu will find their way to his brand new Sag Harbor location. In addition to fish plates and raw bar bites, diners can expect classic lobster rolls in two sizes, as well as Mr. McFarland’s famous lobster meatballs and New England clam chowder. Check out his new location profiled in 27 East here.