new books at ICC edu

Library Notes: New Books at ICC [October 2016]

The ICC library is continuously growing and evolving. In this new column, we will highlight a few favorites from our new acquisitions shelf.

Sushi Lovers alert! If you loved the documentary Jiro Dreams of Sushi then you are already familiar with Jiro Ono, the brilliant and delicate sushi craftsman. In Sushi Chef Sukiyabashi Jiro by Shinzo Satomi, the reader is welcomed into his kitchen. First published in Japan in 1997, it is only now available in English from translator Rei Perovic. With beautiful color photos as well as maps and diagrams, it is no stretch to call this book a sushi bible. Our own Chef Jeffery Moon loved it and called it the best sushi book he has seen. Satomi digs deeper that simple instruction during his interviews with Jiro providing an insight into his style and philosophy. This book is a must read for aspiring chefs, seafood lovers and Japanese food enthusiasts.

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As the weather starts to turn, we begin craving comfort foods that will fill the house with fragrance and cure an impending cold. The recipes in Small Victories by Julia Turshen fit the bill. Julia’s philosophy is the simpler the better and to grow as a cook and fund success in the kitchen, we must celebrate the small victories – each little step along the way.  While certainly geared toward the home cook, culinary students can take away from this an open minded, expansive approach to recipes. For each included in the book, Julia provides what she calls “Spin-Offs” or variations that completely change the recipe or utilize the ingredients in a whole new way. So whether you are craving Snow-Day Udon Soup  or Chicken + Pea Skillet Pie you will learn several other recipes right along with it. Recommended for simple go-to comfort recipes or novice cooks.

Chef Jose Pizarro owns three Spanish restaurants in London, but instead of creating a book dedicated to one of them, he chose to highlight the cuisine from his favorite city, San Sebastian. The Basque Book by Jose Pizarro is a beautiful colorful celebration of the famed Spanish city and the whole Basque region. All the recipes are labeled either “Pintxos” or “At the Table” – meaning small plates or main dishes.  However, says Jose “Sometimes I just think anything goes.” Dive in for his take on classics such as tortilla and empanada as well as new favorites like Swiss chard stew or chestnut flan. An excellent pick for photography lovers, Spanish food fanatics and fine dining fans.

We have these and many more new books available for check out now in the library. Follow us on Instagram for the most current updates @intlcullibrary

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PUMPKIN FINANCIER

Join us at our next Open House for all programs on Tuesday, October 4 and watch our Director of Pastry Operations, Chef Jansen Chan demonstrate how to make these fall favorites! RSVP HERE

PUMPKIN FINANCIER
Yield: 12-4 oz. muffin-size financiers

Ingredients:

8 oz. Butter
1 t. Cinnamon, ground
½ t. Nutmeg, ground
¼ t. Ginger, ground
¼ t. Cloves, ground
¾ cup All-purpose flour
1 cup Almond flour
1 cup Powdered sugar
¼ t. Salt
7 Egg whites
½ cup Pumpkin puree
Powdered sugar, for dusting
Pumpkin seeds, optional, for garnish

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Procedures:

In a medium saucepan, melt butter over medium heat, whisking occasionally. As the mixture begins to boil, continue stirring, until the butter is lightly browned and has a nutty aroma. Remove from heat immediately and add cinnamon, nutmeg, ginger and cloves. Allow to cool slightly.

Meanwhile, in another bowl, stir together the flours, powdered sugar, and salt. In another bowl, whisk the egg whites and pumpkin together until smooth. Add the dry ingredients and stir thoroughly.

Pour about 1/3 of the warm browned butter into the mixture and whisk, until smooth. Repeat twice more, adding 1/3 of the butter each time.

Allow mixture to rest and cool in the refrigerator, preferably overnight.

Preheat the oven to 400°F. Divide the batter into greased cupcake pans.

Top with pumpkin seeds and dust with powdered sugar.

Bake for about 15-20 minutes, or until golden brown. Let cool for 10 minutes before unmolding.

Serve warm or at room temperature.

 

Trifle

Dean Emily Luchetti’s Mocha Zabaglione Trifle

Cake

  • 1 cup all purpose flour
  • 1/4 cup cocoa powder
  • 2 1/2 teaspoons baking powder
  • Large Pinch salt
  • 5 large eggs, separated
  • 1 1/4 cups sugar
  • 1/3 cup hot water
  • 1 teaspoon vanilla extract
  • Preheat the oven to 350 degrees. Sift together the flour, cocoa powder, baking powder, and salt. Set aside.

Whip the egg yolks and sugar in an electric mixer on high speed until thick. Reduce to low speed and add the water. Scrape down the sides of the bowl. Again, whip on high speed until thick. Reduce to low speed and add the dry ingredients.

Whip the egg whites until soft peaks form. Fold them into the batter. Spread the batter onto a parchment paper lined baking sheet, measuring approximately 11 by 16 inches with 1 inch sides.

Bake the cake until a skewer inserted in the middle comes out clean, about 20 minutes. Cool to room temperature. Remove the cake from the pan by running a knife around the inside edge of the pan. Invert the pan on the work surface and carefully peel off the parchment paper.

Zabaglione Cream

  • 8 large egg yolks
  • 1/2 cup granulated sugar
  • 3/4 cup Marsala
  • Pinch salt
  • 1 1/2 cups heavy whipping cream

Whisk together the egg yolks, sugar, Marsala, and salt in a stainless steel bowl. Place the bowl over a pot of boiling water, making sure the water is not touching the bottom of the bowl. Whisk continually until thick like mayonnaise, about 3 minutes. Place the bowl over an ice bath and cool to room temperature. Whip the cream to soft peaks. Fold the cream into the Marsala mixture. Refrigerate.

To assemble the trifle:

  • 1 1/2 cups strong coffee, room temperature
  • 6 ounces bittersweet chocolate, coarsely chopped
  • Cut the cake into quarters. Cut each quarter in half horizontally.

Spread about 1 cup of zabaglione cream in the bottom of a 2 1/2 quart bowl. Cut pieces of cake to fit in a single layer over the cream. Using a pastry brush, brush the cake with about 1/3 cup of the coffee. Repeat layering cream and coffee soaked cake until the cake and zabaglione is used up, finishing with the zabaglione on top. Finely chop the chocolate or grind it in a food processor. Refrigerate the trifle for two hours or overnight before serving.

The cake can be made up to two days before you assemble the trifle. Store it wrapped in plastic wrap at room temperature. The zabaglione can be made a day in advance. The zabaglione can be made a day before you serve it.

Learn more about studying at ICC in New York or Californiawww.culinarycenter.com