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Inside ICC Holiday Hacks: Homemade Sprinkles

Watch our final Inside ICC #HolidayHacks video for 2016 featuring Director of Pastry Operations Jansen Chan demonstrating how to create homemade sprinkles in your own kitchen! Use them as a garnish or mix-in your favorite cookie, muffin, or cake recipes for a colorful pop. Full recipe below. 

 


Ingredients:

400 grams confectioners’ sugar, plus additional as needed

7 grams dried egg whites

Pinch of kosher salt

50 g. water

Food colorings, as desired


Procedure:

  1. In five different bowls, place about 2 g. of food colors of your choice, separately. Ideally, bright and contrasting colors will be best.
  2. In a sixth bowl, mix together the sugar, dried egg whites and salt.
  3. Add water and mix to create a stiff dough. If the dough is too dry, add a few drops of water. If the dough is too wet, add a sprinkling of additional confectioners’ sugar.
  4. Divide the dough into six portions.
  5. Place each portion into the five bowls, reserving the sixth portion to keep white.
  6. Lightly roll the white dough into a ½” log and place on a lightly greased, parchment paper.
  7. Using gloves, working from the lightest color to the darkest colors, knead each mixture until it is fully homogenous. If the dough is too wet, add a sprinkling of additional confectioners’ sugar.
  8. Before moving on the next color, roll the dough into a ½” log and place adjacent to the initial white dough log.
  9. Repeat until all dough portions are mixed and placed the third log next to the second log and the fourth, fifth and sixth logs direction on top of the first three logs.
  10. Remove gloves and roll the parchment paper to compress the six logs to create one larger log.
  11. Unwrap from parchment paper and allow to dry 2-3 days at room temperature, unwrapped.
  12. Rotate the log after the first 24 hrs, to allow all sides to dry.
  13. Grate the dry log against a cheese grater and spread on another parchment paper to dry for a few hours as individual pieces.
  14. Store in an airtight container at room temperature, until needed.
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Profiles in Pastry: Matt Robicelli

Written by Daisy Martinez

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Allison and Matt Robicelli of Robicelli’s Bakery (picture courtesy of Brooklyn Magazine)

Matt Robicelli was an FDNY Paramedic who suffered a career ending injury at the age of 20, as a first responder to the World Trade Center on 9/11.

After spending a year recovering from his injuries and having reconstructive surgery on his legs, Matt was facing a future without a career. He decided to follow his first love of cooking and enrolled at ICC, where he graduated at the top of his class and became a protege of Master Chef Andres Soltner. Their friendship was fruitful and Matt became the final head boulanger at legendary New York City restaurant Lutece, gaining that title before he had even graduated. Since then, Matt and his wife Allison opened their own bakery, Robecelli’s in Brooklyn, New York to critical acclaim.

This autumn, Matt and Allison (and family) have moved their bakery to Baltimore, Maryland and partnered with Fransmart to make their delicious baked goods available nationwide through franchises! We love a story with a sweet ending!

 

 

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The Importance of Tasting

By Kaitlin Wayne

ICC Student, Professional Pastry Arts

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In the individual desserts unit of Level 2 Professional Pastry Arts, we focused on making custards – such as crème brulee (my all time favorite), crème caramel, ice creams, sorbets, cheesecake, molten cake, and donuts.

Part of our class time is dedicated to “degustation,”or tasting. While this may sound like we all just sit around the kitchen and eat ice cream, there is far more to it than that. We are not learning how to eat; we are learning how to literally taste. This distinction is essential. When I taste something, I don’t just think to myself, “Mmm this is delicious!” I think more critically about what I am eating, the layers of flavor, the texture, and the overall balance.

Take vanilla ice cream, for example. Here are some things that you should be looking for in a successful plate with vanilla ice cream: Is the ice cream smooth on the palate? You should not feel any icy patches or grainy textures and there should be a strong vanilla flavor. These mistakes can often result when the temperature of the ice cream is abused by leaving it out, letting it melt slightly, and then returning it to the freezer. As for the overall plate and pairing with the ice cream, look for contrast in color and flavor. This is very important in terms of balance. For example, rather than plating my quenelle of white ice cream with a creamy-colored and similarly-flavored crème anglaise, I might pair it with a rich, dark chocolate sauce.

I can see how being able to taste a dessert and ask yourself questions like this will help you to grow as a chef. I am a strong believer in the fact that culinary and pastry arts are the only professions where you truly use all five of your senses at once. By learning to dissect every component of a plate and identify the elements that make up a truly successful dessert, I can already tell that going out to eat will  never be the same again!