Celebrating 5th Year of The Cookie Games at ICC New York Campus

The International Culinary Center® New York campus will be holding its fifth annual school-wide cookie competition on Thursday, May 25th from 3:30-5:30 PM in the ICC Amphitheater.

The Cookie Games was developed to challenge current ICC students to create an original cookie recipe inspired by a country of their choice. Teams of one or two submit a name and recipe for their cookie concept. Recipes should have a country of origin and will be judged based on creativity, execution, and taste. Based on submissions, an in-house committee will select 10 finalist teams to produce their cookie for a high-profile judging panel. The judges will award first, second and third place winners. In addition, all audience and press attendees at the ceremony will have a chance to try each of the eligible cookies and vote for a Fan Favorite.

Each year students deliver a wide assortment of international concepts such as Duck Fat Cookies (France), Rosy Taro Cookie (China) and Mole Cookie (Mexico). Winning entries have included: Dulcetto Bar (Russia) by Bojena Linton (2013), Coconut Daun Pandan (Malaysia) by Vianna Sinnan (2014) and Chocolate Cardamom Button (India) by Savita Bhat (2015).

This year, our judge’s panel will feature Angie Mar (Chef/Owner at Beatrice Inn), Dorie Greenspan (Cookbook Author), Florian Bellanger (Executive Pastry Chef at MadMac), Robb Riedel (Managing Editor of Food Network Magazine) and Erik Murnighan (President of the International Culinary Center).

Judges in the past have included: Kate Heddings (Senior Editor of Food & Wine), Daniel Holzman (Chef/Owner of The Meatball Shop), Bob Truitt (Corporate Pastry Chef of Altamarea Group), Jacques Torres (Chef/Owner of Jacques Torres Chocolate), Christina Tosi (Chef/Owner of Milk Bar) and Emily Luchetti (Chief Pastry Officer of Big Night Restaurant Group).

The 2017 event occurs with generous support from our premier sponsor, KitchenAid, as well as additional sponsorship from Michele Et Augustin and Island Ware. 

 

Use the official hashtag #TheCookieGames to share your favorites on social media!

ICC In The News: Highlights From April 2017

ICC In The News provides monthly highlights featuring ICC alumni, deans, faculty and friends. Stories of our 15,000+ alumni network and their successes are continuously popping up across various prestigious publications. Below, we have aggregated some of our favorites from April 2017, aimed to inspire readers to #LoveWhatYouDo in the kitchen and beyond.


Christina Tosi Opens New NYC Milk Bar Location in Financial District.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

The ICC Professional Pastry Arts alumni, Christina Tosi,  opened her 9th NYC location and 12th overall location of Milk Bar in the city’s Financial District. Tosi joins a plethora of influential chefs and restaurateurs who are embracing the FiDi neighborhood, with new outposts of Mario Batali’s Eataly, Daniel Boulud’s Épicerie Boulud, and an upcoming 6,000 square-foot venture from Danny Meyer in the works for the area. Read more about MilkBar FiDi, here on Time Out New York.


ICC Expands Olive Oil Certification Program to California Campus 

The Olive Oil Program at the International Culinary Center will be expanding to the Campbell, California campus with a six-day, two-level olive oil sommelier certification course this July in conjunction with The Olive Oil Times and Curtis Cord, the program’s executive director. An international faculty of renowned experts will guide students through more than 100 olive oil samples from 26 countries in the world’s most comprehensive curriculum in olive oil quality assessment. Click here to learn how to register.


Food & Wine’s Best New Chefs 2017 

Alumni and executive chef of The Beatrice Inn, Angie Mar, makes the list of culinary newcomers to be recognized by Food & Wine Magazine. As an alum of The Spotted Pig and Marlow & Sons, Angie continues to break the mold of the male-dominated meat world. To see all the honorees, click here.


The Real Differences Between Yams and Sweet Potatoes

Learn the differences between yams and sweet potatoes from ICC Master Chef Marc Bauer, including how to spot them out in a grocery store. Chef Marc also discusses the nutritional differences between the two with Real Simple. Click here to read the full story.


The World’s 50 Best Restaurants 2017  [1-50]

In April, The World’s 50 Best announced the honorees for the 2017 edition of the top 50 restaurants across the globe. While NYC’s Eleven Madison Park earned the #1 spot, the ‘Highest Climber Award‘ was bestowed upon ICC alumni Dan Barber‘s Blue Hill at Stone Barns located in Pocantino Hills, New York. ICC’s Farm-to-Table program students actually have the luxury of spending a full week at Barber’s farm, while being mentored by the agriculturally conscious chef. To view the full list of restaurants, click here


Macaron or Macaroon? Here’s the Difference

In an article for Real Simple, Director of Pastry Operations, Jansen Chan, explains the major differences between macarons and macaroons. Discover the history behind both in the full article, here.


GQ Talks With Dean of Special Programs Jacques Pépin 

In a brand new interview with GQ Magazine, ICC’s very own Dean of Special Programs, Jacques Pépin, speaks out on his upcoming episode of American Masters on PBS, his funniest Julia Child story, drinking wine over water and much more. Learn more about the legendary chef, here.

Recipe: Chocolate Crumble Focaccia

Within our NYC pastry kitchens, Director of Pastry Operations, Jansen Chan, is always coming up with new recipes and techniques to propel the creativity of Pastry Arts students and inspire them to develop recipes of their own. Learn how to recreate his latest recipe below, and join our next Open House to catch a live demonstration by Chef Jansen. CLICK HERE to learn dates and register one of ICC’s upcoming Open Houses.

 


CHOCOLATE CRUMBLE FOCACCIA 
Yield: 9” x 13” pan, about 12 servings

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INGREDIENTS:

¼ cup + 2 tablespoons cocoa
½ cup coffee, hot
3 ¼ cup flour, all-purpose
¼ cup sugar
7g. yeast, dry (1 sachets)
1 ½ cup water, lukewarm
1 ½ teaspoon salt
1 c. dark chocolate, 55%-65%, chopped
Crumble (see next)
Powdered sugar, for garnish


PROCEDURE: 

-In a bowl, whisk cocoa with hot coffee. Reserve and let cool slightly.

-In a stand mixer with a paddle attachment, mix cocoa mixture, flour, sugar, yeast and water at a low speed for 3-5 minutes, or until thoroughly mixed.

-Add the salt and increase the mixer speed to medium and allow to knead until the dough comes together on the hook, about 12-15 mins.

-Add chopped chocolate.

-Transfer the dough to a large, oiled bowl and wrap well in plastic wrap.

-Place in a warm spot, such as over a hot oven, until the dough doubles, about 1-2 hours. Or, place the wrapped dough in the refrigerator and allow to proof overnight, for at least 12 hours.

-Grease and parchment line a pan.

-Punch down the proofed dough, transfer to the prepared pan, and push and stretch the dough down evenly.

-Sprinkle the crumble on top.

-Cover the dough loosely with plastic wrap and allow the dough to proof again in a warm spot until doubled about 1-2 hours.

-Preheat the oven to 400 F°.

-Bake at 400 F for 35-40 mins. or until 185 F°, if using a thermometer.

-Allow cooling for 15 mins. before cutting.

-Dust with powdered sugar, if desired.

-Wrap well to keep moist.


INGREDIENTS FOR CRUMBLE

1 ¾ cup flour, all-purpose

1 ½ cup brown sugar

¾ teaspoon salt

¼ teaspoon cinnamon

3 oz. (¾ stick) butter, unsalted, cold


CRUMBLE PROCEDURE: 

-Combine flour, brown sugar, salt, and sugar in a mixer bowl.

-Cut butter into smaller pieces.

-In a stand mixer with a paddle attachment, combine butter and dry ingredients until sandy.

-Reserve in a refrigerator until needed.

 

Celebrate Lunar New Year with a Black Sesame Gâteau Basque

In honor of the Lunar New Year this Saturday, January 28, Director of Pastry Operations Jansen Chan shares his recipe for a classic french pastry with an Asian twist. In collaboration Sinovision, Chef Jansen incorporates black sesame to further illustrate the fusions between French and Chinese cultures.

Watch and learn how to create this delicious treat to welcome in the year of the rooster.

“Traditionally, Lunar New Year is celebrated with a selection of confections or fresh fruit, which you can have out all day for visiting friends and family. The French pastry, Gâteau Basque, is rich and delicious, and this version incorporates a popular Asian ingredient, black sesame, in its creamy, custardy filling. It holds beautifully for a few days and is an unexpected dish to honor the New Year.” – Jansen Chan


Recipe: Black Sesame Gâteau Basque With Cherries
Yield: one – 8” cake

Ingredients for Gâteau Basque Assembly:

½ Gâteau Basque dough

½ Black sesame pastry cream, cooled

½ cup dried or poached and drained sour cherries

Egg wash

Black and white sesame seeds, for garnish (optional)


Procedures for Gâteau Basque Assembly:

  1. Prepare 8” cake pan or cake ring with butter or pan release spray.
  2. Place the dough batter into a piping bag fitted with a #4 piping tip.
  3. Starting in the center of the pan, pipe an even spiral of dough around the base of the pan, and up the sides, about 1” high.
  4. Place the pastry cream in the center well, making sure no custard is touching the sides of the pan.
  5. Sprinkle cherries on top of the pastry cream, pushing them in slightly to create a flat surface.
  6. Pipe another spiral of dough on top of the pastry cream, sealing the filling in. If necessary, spread the dough smooth on top.
  7. Brush the top of the dough with egg wash, and sprinkle with sesame seeds as desired.
  8. Bake at room temperature 375 F for 25-30 mins., or until a deep, golden brown.
  9. Allow to cool before unmolding.
  10. Serve at room temperature.

Ingredients for Black Sesame Pastry Cream:

100 g. black sesame seeds

60 g. sesame oil

500 g. milk

100 g. sugar

5 egg yolks

40 g. cornstarch

¼ t. salt


Procedures for Black Sesame Pastry Cream:

  1. Blend sesame seeds and sesame oil until it forms a thick paste. Reserve.
  2. In a medium saucepan, bring milk and half of the sugar to a boil.
  3. Meanwhile, in a bowl, whisk eggs, sugar, and cornstarch together.
  4. Off heat, add ¼ of hot milk to egg mixture and whisk. Return entire mixture to the pot.
  5. Over medium heat, continue to cook with a whisk, until fully boiling. Allow to boil for 2 minutes.
  6. Remove from heat and whisk in black sesame paste and salt.
  7. Transfer to plastic lined tray, cover with additional plastic wrap, and allow to cool.

Ingredients for Gâteau Basque Dough:

400 g. butter, at room temperature

400 g. sugar

6 eggs

1 t. vanilla extract

300 g. flour

1 t. baking powder

¾ t. salt

 

Procedures for Gâteau Basque Dough:

  1. In a stand mixer with a paddle attachment, cream butter and sugar until light and fluffy.
  2. Slowly add the eggs and vanilla to the mixture, scraping occasionally.
  3. In a separate bowl, stir together the flour, baking powder and salt.
  4. Add all the dry ingredients to the butter mixture and continue to paddle until just combined.
  5. Use immediately.

Inside ICC Holiday Hacks: Homemade Sprinkles

Watch our final Inside ICC #HolidayHacks video for 2016 featuring Director of Pastry Operations Jansen Chan demonstrating how to create homemade sprinkles in your own kitchen! Use them as a garnish or mix-in your favorite cookie, muffin, or cake recipes for a colorful pop. Full recipe below. 

 


Ingredients:

400 grams confectioners’ sugar, plus additional as needed

7 grams dried egg whites

Pinch of kosher salt

50 g. water

Food colorings, as desired


Procedure:

  1. In five different bowls, place about 2 g. of food colors of your choice, separately. Ideally, bright and contrasting colors will be best.
  2. In a sixth bowl, mix together the sugar, dried egg whites and salt.
  3. Add water and mix to create a stiff dough. If the dough is too dry, add a few drops of water. If the dough is too wet, add a sprinkling of additional confectioners’ sugar.
  4. Divide the dough into six portions.
  5. Place each portion into the five bowls, reserving the sixth portion to keep white.
  6. Lightly roll the white dough into a ½” log and place on a lightly greased, parchment paper.
  7. Using gloves, working from the lightest color to the darkest colors, knead each mixture until it is fully homogenous. If the dough is too wet, add a sprinkling of additional confectioners’ sugar.
  8. Before moving on the next color, roll the dough into a ½” log and place adjacent to the initial white dough log.
  9. Repeat until all dough portions are mixed and placed the third log next to the second log and the fourth, fifth and sixth logs direction on top of the first three logs.
  10. Remove gloves and roll the parchment paper to compress the six logs to create one larger log.
  11. Unwrap from parchment paper and allow to dry 2-3 days at room temperature, unwrapped.
  12. Rotate the log after the first 24 hrs, to allow all sides to dry.
  13. Grate the dry log against a cheese grater and spread on another parchment paper to dry for a few hours as individual pieces.
  14. Store in an airtight container at room temperature, until needed.

ICC Partners with MOFAD for 2016 Gingerbread Village Display

The International Culinary Center® will launch their 2016 holiday gingerbread village for an exclusive display at the Museum of Food and Drink. This year’s village, created by ICC Director of Pastry Arts Jansen Chan and student volunteers from the Professional Pastry Arts program, will pay tribute to the historic melting pot of all immigrants in the United States. Beginning Friday, December 9 through Saturday, December 31 (between the hours of 12pm and 6pm) the village will be on display to the public attendees of MOFAD.

Illustrating the common act of breaking bread throughout various communities, seven different gingerbread bakeries will each represent the delicious contributions of immigrants from across the globe. Steamed buns, conchas, flatbread, pretzels, injera, challah, baguettes and croissants will each be showcased throughout the gingerbread village to highlight different nations. A bridge of gingerbread men will unite each island over a sea of fortune cookies – a nod to another delectable immigrant creation, and lead to the main gingerbread bakery representing the United States.

Through the collaboration, attendees will have the exclusivity of experiencing New York City’s only location to enjoy gingerbread-flavored fortune cookies – made directly on site at the Museum of Food and Drink.

I’m excited to work with MOFAD to display our Professional Pastry Arts students’ work. It is the perfect location to see how food celebrates our traditions and allows us to share the experience with one another. As always, our gingerbread displays are catered to their homes, and this year we are happy to supplement MOFAD’s study in immigrant food contributions.”
Jansen Chan, Director of Pastry Arts at the International Culinary Center®

MOFAD and ICC both share a passion for education and food culture. We are thrilled to partner with ICC to spread holiday cheer and celebrate immigrant contributions to American food culture.”
Peter Kim, Executive Director, Museum of Food and Drink

 

MOFAD is located at 62 Bayard Street, Brooklyn, NY 11222

For ICC media inquiries, contact: Angela Samartano asamartano@culinarycenter.com
For MOFAD media inquiries, contact: Jen Neugeboren jen@hannaleecommunications.com