The Insider’s Guide to Nailing Your Trail

Article by David Janke
Associate Dean of Students, International Culinary Center

I am a graduate of ICC’s Professional Culinary Arts program and a former Sous Chef at a Michelin star restaurant.  As a sous chef, I had the responsibility of setting up trails, interviewing, and vetting potential employees when they would come for a trail.  Part of my role as Associate Dean of Student is managing our Career Services department and ensuring that they properly prepare our students for the most important first step in one’s professional career: the trail. For our current students–and alumni–preparing for ICC’s upcoming Career Fair, here are 5 tips to help you succeed on your next kitchen trail!


1. Be persistent!

Communication in this industry is notoriously slow, and it can be frustrating to wait several days or more for a response from a potential employer.  Always use the three day rule: if they have not gotten back to you in three days, send a follow up email.

2. Ask the right questions.

When setting up the trail, there are 3 questions you should always ask.

1) What door should I enter through?
Most of the time, kitchen staff will enter a restaurant through a different entrance that is not always so easy to find.

2) What should I wear?
Most restaurants provide uniforms, but not all of them.

3) Should I bring my knives and equipment?
Different establishments provide different equipment for their employees, so it is always good to ask.  I would always bet on at least bringing your knives in a small knife roll.

3. Be punctual!

If your trail is set to start at 8am, that means you are expected to be dressed and ready to go no later than 8am.  Always give yourself plenty of time, leave early, and plan to arrive no later than 15 mins early.

4. Be positive.

Employers are not necessarily using the trail to specifically test your knife or cooking skills.  They want to see that you are competent in the kitchen, for sure.  But what is much more important is the attitude and demeanor you bring with you.  A supervisor is really looking for someone who is positive, gladly takes on new tasks and responsibilities, and has a team player mentality.  Be sure to focus on those “soft skills” throughout the trail.

5. Send a thank you email.

After you complete your trail, always send a thank you email to the person you have been communicating with from the employer.  Even if you are not offered the job, or choose not to take the position, it sets the proper tone professionally and leaves a good impression.  In an industry where everyone seems to know everyone, reputation is important.

What is a soft skill? 

“Soft skills” in this industry are traits and attributes that are more nuanced and subtle, but just as important to employers when searching for the right candidate. While one’s hard skills – knife skills, knowledge of cooking terms and techniques, etc. – are certainly important, it is the soft skills that can play a major role in one’s success. Being punctual and always arriving early, having a positive attitude and strong work ethic, being the first to volunteer your time; these are all examples of soft skills. And the good news is, these are factors that you can control. For instance, you may not have the best knife skills yet; that is a skill set that develops over time and with practice.  However, if you show a willingness to improve and excel at other soft skills, you will be successful.


For more information on Career Services at ICC, click here.

Alumni Spotlight: Chantale Doinel, Culinary Arts Class of 2016

As native of Normandy, France, Chantale Doinel grew up with a love of French cuisine and an appreciation for seasonality. For the last 35 years, she has been working as an esthetician and owner of a skin care salon. However, it was her passion for food and cooking that inspired her return to school to embark on a new career. Chantale graduated from the International Culinary Center’s Silicon Valley campus in 2016 with a diploma in Professional Culinary Arts. Today, she is working as a successful private chef based in the San Francisco Bay Area. We sat down with her to discuss how she switched gears professionally for a life dedicated to the culinary arts.

Thrive to improve, do not complain, and practice.”

What makes the culinary industry appealing to you?

Chantale: Whether it’s a dinner for two, a picnic in the woods, a banquet on a beach or a well-prepared sandwich on a hike, I find great satisfaction in procuring balanced and memorable meals for other people.

When did you know you wanted to work in the food industry?

Chantale: About 12 years ago, when my friends asked me to share my knowledge of regional French cuisine, I started giving them cooking lessons. I realized then that I wanted to learn more about the industry as a whole so that I could better transmit knowledge to my peers. As I am constantly eager to learn, I sought a certification to validate my qualification as a cook.

What were your greatest challenges at school and how were you able to overcome them?

Chantale:  Speed, timing and organization were challenging concepts for me, not to mention the fact that, as I went to school at night, I was working full-time during the day. I tried to overcome these obstacles by being prepared for each class, mindfully studying the  material and practicing knife skills at home.

What inspires your style of cooking?

Chantale: My mother taught me everything about traditional French family cooking. Growing up, our refrigerator was always empty as I was raised to do the shopping on a daily basis and get inspiration according to the season.  As we were a large family, my brothers and I were assigned tasks in the kitchen; from an early age we were roasting, braising, grilling, and making pastries. We often ate specialties from the Normandy region and the Loire Valley and but also exotic dishes from the places we traveled to with my father when he was in the army such as Morocco and Germany.


Follow Chantale’s culinary creations on Instagram via @chantalescuisine

Honoring Stacy’s Rise Project Scholarship Recipients for Women’s Entrepreneurship Day

This Women’s Entrepreneurship Day, First Class of Stacy’s Rise Project Scholarship Recipients Receive Mentorship to Help Break Through Male-Dominated Field

PR Newswire — November 2017 — In honor of Women’s Entrepreneurship Day on November 19, Stacy’s celebrated the inaugural class of Stacy’s Rise Project scholarship recipients with a professional development day hosted at the renowned International Culinary Center (ICC) in New York City. The day provided these female entrepreneurs business advice, tools, and support to continue to break through some of the toughest barriers to women in any field.

“Stacy’s is committed to empowering the next generation of female culinary leaders to pursue their dreams, and is thrilled to celebrate the first class of Stacy’s Scholarship for Female Culinary Leaders recipients,” said Stuart Beck, senior director of marketing, Stacy’s Snacks. “Each of these women has developed impressive business plans that we are proud to be able to support – and ultimately be a part of advancing the number of women entrepreneurs in the U.S.”

The Stacy’s Rise Project was born out of Stacy’s roots as a brand founded by female entrepreneur Stacy Madison, who started by baking pita bread into fresh chips each day to give her customers waiting in line at her Boston food cart. Customers loved the simple but delicious chips so much that they encouraged her to start her own brand and today they are America’s favorite pita chip. Launched earlier this year, the Stacy’s Rise Project helps female culinary entrepreneur hopefuls pursue their business endeavors through scholarship, mentorship and thought leadership. In September, Stacy’s awarded $40,000 in scholarships and stipends to four women entering the Culinary Entrepreneurship Program at ICC. Recipients participated in the six-week entrepreneurship program that demystifies the start-up process and guides them through the steps of business planning in an immersive, mentorship-driven environment.

Future culinary luminaries: the inaugural scholarship class
This year’s scholarship recipients include promising and inspiring female entrepreneurs whose business plans may differ but share a common passion for food and hospitality.

Raven Rivera was born and raised on Long Island in Bay Shore, N.Y. Although equipped with a Master of Arts in television, Raven had a dream to one day be a restaurateur. Stacy’s Rise Project and ICC’s Culinary Entrepreneurship Program have helped her follow her dream. She is embracing her family’s roots and is opening a Puerto Rican restaurant that families, friends and the surrounding community can enjoy.

Kiki Canuto is a trilingual world traveler from Massachusetts who would like to create connections and cultivate fulfillment through the food she serves. She is the owner of The Getaway Plate, which provides families with in-home meal prep in the Greater Boston area. Kiki’s zest for life is contagious and she is passionate about simplifying the lives of families who are very busy, but also value enjoying a meal together at the end of the day. With the tools she gained from ICC’s Culinary Entrepreneurship Program, she hopes to soon expand her services to Southern California.

Eunice Giarta is a Californian-turned-New Yorker. Having previously studied engineering and working in software, she found her passion for a different type of challenge—not in an office, but in a kitchen where she pursued further education in pastry arts. She enjoys the methodical, precise and special art of baking and loves sharing the fruits of her labor with others. Eunice plans to leverage the business plan and mentorship advice she received through the Stacy’s Rise Project and ICC’s Culinary Entrepreneurship Program to open a dessert bar in Chicago where she can share her cultural background and love of pastry by merging Asian-inspired flavors and French-pastry techniques.

Jane Deegan hails from Manhattan, New York. Baking also holds a special place in her heart, as the art has helped Janie find her light, beauty, and inspiration after struggling with homelessness and addiction growing up. Janie aspires to open a bakery and café that serves light food and specializes in delicious baked goods that are a creative, modern twist on American classics. A dream that would be far more difficult to achieve without the financial support of the Stacy’s Rise Project and the advanced culinary business education from ICC. Her most notable product thus far is her Pie Crust Cookie, which has already gained attention from top food industry experts. She currently operates an online business named Janie Bakes.

Stacy’s and ICC will continue the work of the Stacy’s Rise Project next year, awarding $60,000 in scholarships and stipends to future female entrepreneurs. Visit to learn more about Stacy’s Rise Project, scholarship opportunities, and the brand’s commitment to supporting women.

To learn more about the scholarship, click here.

About Stacy’s Snacks
Stacy’s Snacks is one of the many brands that make up Frito-Lay North America, the $15 billion convenient foods division of PepsiCo, Inc. (NYSE: PEP), which is headquartered in Purchase, NY. Learn more about Frito-Lay at the corporate website,, the Snack Chat blog, and on Twitter

About PepsiCo
PepsiCo products are enjoyed by consumers one billion times a day in more than 200 countries and territories around the world. PepsiCo generated more than $63 billion in net revenue in 2015, driven by a complementary food and beverage portfolio that includes Frito-Lay, Gatorade, Pepsi-Cola, Quaker, and Tropicana. PepsiCo’s product portfolio includes a wide range of enjoyable foods and beverages, including 22 brands that generate more than $1 billion each in estimated annual retail sales.


Discover The May-Mei Italian Culinary Academy

Calling all culinary professionals – May-Mei Italian Culinary Academy is launching a new, modern Culinary Institute for the hospitality industry, young professionals, culinary institutions and Italian cuisine enthusiasts around the world. Beginning this year, May-Mei will offer intensive short courses for individuals, with limited time availability, who wish to learn or refresh their knowledge of Italian cooking techniques, Italian food products, the flavors, the traditions and culture of the Italian table.


Founded by Tony May, Sergio Mei and Bruno Libralon, May-Mei Italian Culinary Academy offers a five-day short intensive course, arriving in Italy on Sunday and returning home on Saturday. Perfect for young students and professional development, this course combines theory and practical lessons with hands-on experience and field trips to local producers. Each day culminates in the kitchen where students cook what they learned during the day.


The board of the May-Mei is extending an exclusive offer to ICC Alumni for the initial course, September 17-23, 2017 at Gambero Rosso in Rome, of 25% off the published website price.


Interested in attending? Please contact Tony May at

To review the course program at Gambero Rosso, price, studies, and visits to producers for this inaugural class, please visit for details about the offer.

For more information and a schedule of the 2017-2018 dates, please visit or


The Cookie Games 2017 Winners: Browned Butter Masala Chai Cookies

This year’s first place winner of The Cookie Games at the International Culinary Center’s New York City campus came from Professional Culinary Arts students. The duo of Madeline Dudek and Clara Lim chose the country of India as their main inspiration for their original cookie recipe. Creating Browned Butter Masala Chai Cookies, the duo received the highest score among the 10 competitors judged by the likes of Dorie Greenspan (Cookbook Author), Angie Mar (ICC Alumni and Chef/Owner of Beatrice Inn), renowned pastry chef Florian Bellanger, Robb Riedel of Food Network Magazine, and ICC’s President, Erik Murnighan.

The following recipe yields 48 cookies. Try them out for yourself today!


  • 2 cups butter, unsalted, divided
  • 1-2 star anise
  • ¼ cup plus 2 tbsp. chai spices
  • -2 parts EACH ground cardamom and ground ginger
  • -1 part EACH ground fennel seed, ground coriander and ground cinnamon
  • 2 teaspoons Chinese five spice
  • 4 ½ cups flour, all-purpose
  • 2 tsp. baking soda
  • 2 tsp. salt
  • 2 cup light brown sugar, packed
  • 1 cup sugar
  • 2 eggs
  • 2 egg yolks
  • 2 tsp. molasses
  • 1 tbsp. vanilla extract
  • ¾ cup pecans, ground and toasted

For garnish:

  • 1 red beet, peeled and cubed
  • Coconut chips, unsweetened
  • 2 cups white chocolate, chopped
  • Ground cardamom, as needed
  • Ground cinnamon, as needed


Prepare the browned butter by melting 1 cup of butter in a saucepan placed over medium heat with 1-2 star anise to infuse. Stir until nutty and light brown. Remove immediately from the heat and add the chai spices and Chinese five spice. Set aside to cool. While still liquid, strain the butter through a fine-mesh strainer, discarding the spices.

In a bowl, stir together the flour, baking soda, and salt. Set aside.

In a stand mixer with a paddle attachment, cream the cooled browned butter, butter, and sugars until light and fluffy. Add one egg or egg yolk at a time, scraping the sides occasionally. Add vanilla and molasses and mix. Add all dry ingredients and pecans and mix until just incorporated. Flatten the dough into a disk, cover with plastic wrap and allow to rest in the refrigerator.

On a lightly floured surface, roll dough out and cut into diamond shapes. Place onto baking trays, lined with parchment paper. Return the portions to the refrigerator until chilled.

Preheat the oven to 350°F.

Bake the cookies for 10-12 minutes, or until lightly browned. Allow cooling before decorating.

For garnish:

Preheat the oven to 350°F.

In a blender, process beet pieces with a small amount of water. Transfer the puree to a cheesecloth lined bowl, and squeeze the juice out. Discard the beet products.

Mix coconut chips with some of the beet juice to dye them red and spread on a parchment-lined baking sheet. Bake for about 5 minutes. Allow cooling before decorating.

Melt 3/4 white chocolate in a metal or glass bowl over a pot of simmering water, stirring constantly. When completely melted, remove the bowl from the heat and add remaining white chocolate, stirring to cool the chocolate. When completely melted, add cardamom and cinnamon, as desired. Drizzle the tempered white chocolate over the cooled cookies.

Before the chocolate sets, finish with a piece of cooled, coconut chip in the center of each cookie.

Julian Medina

Julian Medina, chef-owner of Toloache, Yerba Buena, Coppelia, Tacuba Mexican Cantina and La Chula has been creating refined Mexican cuisine for over fifteen years. Raised in Mexico City Julian moved here in 1996 and graduated from ICC (formerly French Culinary Institute) in 1999. He has been featured in many publications, including The New York Times, The New Yorker and on Iron Chef America in 2011.


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Alumni Spotlight: Jae Lee, 2016 California Culinary Arts Graduate

After immigrating to America, Jae Lee owned and ran a successful Japanese restaurant. Over time though, he realized the need for a solid culinary education to build on and solidify his knowledge. Read the story of how Jae Lee went from 2016 California Culinary Arts graduate to Sushi Chef and General Manager of Kenji Sushi in San Jose, California.

There are times when you’re so tired from work, but still can’t hate it because you love what you do.” – Jae Lee

ICC: What were the steps and thoughts that lead you to the decision to attend the ICC?

Jae: I was born and raised in Korea, and during my childhood days, I remember always making my own snacks after school. Even with the instant cup noodles, I tried something different by adding seafood and some spices to make a fancy noodle soup and I did this pretty much throughout my childhood days. After I graduated high school, I wanted to go to culinary school in the U.S. but I first had to take ESL classes and learn English. During those days, I worked part-time jobs in the food industry. After I got married, I thought skipping culinary school and owning my own business would be a good idea so I started my own Japanese restaurant. I owned this restaurant for seven years and although is was successful, I wished I knew more than just Japanese or Korean food. I wanted to broaden my knowledge in professional culinary techniques. I had regrets on not going to culinary school, so I sold my business and found ICC.

ICC: Today, you have taken on responsibility in your family’s business—How you get involved with Kenji and what are some of your day-to-day tasks?

Jae: Working as a Sushi Chef and also in general management, I start my mornings off by making sure all staff members are prepared for the day. I check the receipt and quality of all deliveries for the day’s ingredients and I ensure the cleanliness of the restaurant. The task that gives me the most joy is creating a meal with raw fish behind the sushi bar while a customer is in front me watching how I make things. I love seeing the smiling faces of customers and hearing them tell me that they love what I made them.

I work at Kenji because my family owns the restaurant but, my main motivation is the style and the concept that this restaurant pursues. It blends in with my previous Japanese restaurant business and the new things I learned at ICC.

ICC: What advice would you give to someone considering enrolling in culinary school?

You should not hesitate to pursue a culinary education if you love sharing with people the food you’ve made. You learn so much in school! Even after owning my own restaurant business for 7 years, there’s still so much I learned. Coming to ICC was definitely one of the best decision I made throughout my career.

ICC: What were your greatest challenges at school and how were you able to overcome them?

Jae: My greatest challenge at school was attending evening classes while working full time but my passion for learning new things kept me going.

ICC: What is the best industry advice you’ve ever received?

Jae: The best advice I’ve ever received was when one of my professors who said that most important thing about business is the ‘concept of the restaurant’. Because my career goal is to have my own restaurant again, I find this very practical advice.

ICC: Tell us about your current role at Kenji Sushi in San Jose?

Jae: I work as a Sushi Chef at Kenji and also do general management. I start my morning off by making sure all staff is covered, checking all deliveries for today’s ingredients and cleanliness of the restaurant. Creating a meal with raw fish behind the sushi bar, while a customer is in front of you watching how you make things; this is one of my joy of my job. Seeing the smiling faces of customers telling me they love what I made them.

Connect with Jae Lee on Instagram via  @jay_lee_man and @kenji_sushi.

Alumni Profile: Lauren Dinley [2015 Culinary Arts Graduate]

Lauren Dinley is a graduate of the International Culinary Center in Campbell, California. After receiving her diploma in Professional Culinary Arts, alumni Lauren Dinley took on a very sweet position with B. Toffee.  Learn her story below on following your passion and setting realistic expectations for yourself to achieve goals.

In what capacity do you work for B. toffee? What does your job entail in a broad sense as well as day-to-day?

B. toffee, although is growing rapidly, is still a small company with a reasonably small team. When I started working for B. toffee, my main job description was toffee production and packaging. In the last year, I’ve worked with the owner, Betsy, in the office, in an attempt to see the business side of things more. Prior to this holiday season, we added a few new people to our team, giving us time to train them in production. Because of this added help, I was in charge of all of our web orders, getting them packaged, labeled, and shipped. On a day-to-day basis, I’ll arrive early in the day and either start toffee production or packaging of the toffee. Some days we have more orders going out, so I help ship them before getting started in the kitchen.

How did you get involved with the company?


In Fall 2012, pre-ICC, I took a semester at Orange Coast College in their Culinary Arts program. Periodically, restaurants or other companies in the industry would contact the director of the program seeking interns or students looking for employment. Betsy had emailed our director and upon reading the job posting I applied, this was either November or December of 2012. I actually didn’t get hired until February 2013 because Betsy was so busy with the holiday season!


What inspired you to enroll in culinary school? Were there certain steps/thoughts that lead you to the decision?

Cooking has always been something I’ve enjoyed. When I was 16, I was going through a major chef wannabe phase and I began researching culinary schools. Shortly into my research I came across The French Culinary Institute (Pre-ICC days!) and realized that’s where I wanted to learn. I continued my research once I graduated from high school, but started taking courses at Orange Coast College until I knew for sure what I wanted to do. At that point ICC opened a California campus, I emailed the school to set up a meeting/tour. I also reached out to CIA in Napa, why not check it out if I was to be that close? I knew instantly upon arriving that that was the school for me; the tour was amazing, every chef I encountered was great, and the students were both friendly and informative. The school (ICC) was warm and friendly. After my visit, I went back to Southern California where I completed a few more semesters at OCC. This included the one culinary semester. I spent an entire summer saving money and by December 2013 I was officially attending ICC!

What were your greatest challenges at school? And how were you to overcome them?

Honestly, being away from home was the hardest. At that point, it was the first time I’d be out of my family home, and it was exciting and fun, but difficult at times. Luckily, my roommates and classmates became my new little family away from home, and we’re still close friends. School itself came easy to me, I think that’s because I found my niche. I felt comfortable at school, even on challenging days I was calm and ready for whatever was to be thrown our way. Every chef instructor was incredible, they all had a great sense of humor and were so knowledgeable.

If someone was hesitant to pursue and education in the culinary arts, what would you say to encourage them?

I’d tell them to first get a job in the industry. I think a lot of people have this fantasy of what its like to work in the industry based off of cooking shows, celebrity chefs, and even food bloggers. I think a lot of people don’t realize how hard the work is, and that chances are you aren’t always going to be recognized right away. You have to, in most cases, put in the hard work, challenge yourself. You have to be willing to work under great chefs, who at one point in their lives were in the same place as you. I think another important thing for people considering going to culinary school is that the possibilities in the food industry are endless; you don’t have to only pursue a career in restaurants. I think it’s important to get experience in as many different areas within the industry as possible. I knew going into school that long term, restaurants was not where I wanted to end up, but getting some experience from them is so beneficial.”

Connect with Lauren on Instagram via @_tothetable_ 

Recipe: Saint Patrick’s Day Corned Beef by Chef Jeff Butler

Ahead of today’s St. Patrick’s Day celebration, ICC’s Lead Chef-Instructor and resident charcuterie master Jeff Butler teaches us how to create our own corned beef and cabbage dish. The multi-day process will leave you with satisfying results to impress your family and friends on St. Paddy’s day and beyond.  You won’t need the luck of the Irish to complete this recipe, although I’m sure it wouldn’t hurt! Watch the video of the full process below, and view the step-by-step procedure.

Ingredients by Step

Step 1

3 kilo of water

60 Grams pickling spice mix

12 cloves of garlic

15 gram black peppercorns whole

Step 2

288 grams Kosher Salt

12 grams Instacure #1 or DQ #1 curing salt

60 grams granulated sugar

1 Beef Brisket 12-14 lb (5-6 kilo)

Step 3

200 Ml White wine vinegar

1 bottle lager beer

5 Bay leaves

10 grams pickling spices

5 grams black peppercorns

5 cloves garlic peeled

6 Boiler Onions, peeled and left whole

6 Carrots, peeled and left whole

6 stalks celery left whole

1 Green cabbage cut into 8 wedges

10-12 red bliss potatoes


Step 1

Bring water to a boil and remove from flame and put in the pickling spice, garlic and black pepper corns and allow infusing off flame for 1 hour, then strain and reserve leftover spices for step 2.

Chill the infused water down to below 40 degrees.

Step 2

Weigh the water; you will need to have exactly 3 kilo of water in total.  If you have lost water due to evaporation then supplement the difference with cold tap water.

Thoroughly mix in kosher salt, Instacure #1 and sugar into the 3 kilo of water to create the brine.

Pump the brine into the brisket spacing apart injections in a pattern with approximately 1 inch spacing.

Submerge the meat in a plastic container with the remaining brine and add the reserved spices and garlic from step 1.

Let meat sit 3-5 days in the brine.  Flip the meat daily in the brine so that it gets evenly cured.

Step 3

Remove the meat from the brine, wipe off spices and discard brine.

Put brisket in a large pot and cover with cold water. Bring up to a simmer.

Make a cheese cloth sachet (spice bag) of bay leaves, pickling spice, garlic, and black peppercorn.

When the water begins to simmer, skim off the foam that floats to the top. Then add the beer, vinegar and the sachet to the poaching liquid.

Gently simmer the meat for 1 hour. Check tenderness of the meat, if it slides easily off of your meat fork it is done. Check tenderness of meat every 15 minutes

Add the carrots, celery and onions to the pot and simmer for 30 minutes to 1 hour

Check the tenderness of the meat if it is tender then remove the brisket, cooked carrots, celery and onions from the broth and allow to rest covered.

While the meat is resting add the cabbage and potatoes to liquid in the pot.  Cook until tender. Remove and discard the sachet.

Slice the brisket across the grain and warm in some of the broth. Cut the carrots, onions, and celery into servable chunks and warm in the broth.

Serve the warmed cooked corned beef, cabbage, potatoes and vegetables with good mustard and prepared horse radish.



Alumni Spotlight: Rodrigo Schweitzer, Class of 2011

For our first ICC Alumni Spotlight of 2017, we caught up with Professional Culinary Arts alum chef Rodrigo Schweitzer. Explaining why he felt attending the International Culinary Center in New York was the right choice to pursue his culinary dreams, the Brazil based chef elaborates on ICC’s full immersion program. Learning the fundamental techniques and skills for success in only 6 months, an international student such as Rodrigo has the potential to save thousands of dollars in living expenses and tuition when making their culinary school decision.

The main reason why I chose ICC was because of the full immersion program. So, in my research, I knew that a student here could graduate in 6 months but being taught what they teach in other schools in 2 years. They taught me to be a prepared cook.”

Following up on life after culinary school graduation, Schweizer earned his spot as the winner of Hell’s Kitchen Brasil (Season 3), taking home the 100,000 gold bar prize. Becoming known as the ‘Fit Chef’ while on the show for sharing his weight loss story, Chef Schweitzer helps individuals reach their goals of losing weight through healthy eating habits. With the momentum of the Hell’s Kitchen win still strong, he shares plans to open an elevated pizzeria in Brazil with ‘nontraditional’ toppings.

Watch the full interview to learn about the chef’s new endeavor and more!


Click HERE for more information about how you can #LoveWhatYouDo at ICC as an international student.