Library Notes: June 2017 [New York]

As the weather turns warmer I find myself craving fresh fruits and vegetables more than any other time of the year, and I am always looking for ways to avoid turning on the oven and heating up the kitchen! If you’re like me, you will find plenty of recipe options to do just that right here in the ICC library!

Alice Waters is probably the undisputed queen of highlighting the beauty of seasonal produce. She was smuggling baby greens into the US before they were available in supermarkets and was the first to serve a simple piece of fresh fruit for dessert after a multi-course meal; who better to turn to for fruit advice? Chez Panisse Fruit includes not just recipes but encyclopedic coverage of everything from Apples to Quinces. Each section highlights Waters’ favorite varieties and multiple ways to prepare them. As a bonus, the book also includes some basic recipes you can enhance with your fruit of choice. Try the Chez Panisse take on galette or frangipane then top with your favorite fresh summer fruit. As a bonus, familiarize yourself with Alice Waters and the Chez Panisse story in preparation for her forthcoming memoir, due out this fall!

In Season by Rob Patronite and Robin Raisfeld is the hyper-local source you have always looked for. This compilation of the column by the same name highlights various unique ingredients that can be sourced from New York City Farmers Markets along with flavor profiles, growing season and a recipe contributed by a celebrity chef. So pick up this book to try Daniel Humm’s Strawberry Gazpacho, Jody Williams’s Raw Artichoke Salad or Alex Raij’s Stuffed Avocado Squash.

Instead of being organized by the classic headings of appetizers, entrées and desserts, The Love & Lemons Cookbook by Jeanine Donofrio is divided up by fruit or vegetable! This is ideal for if you receive a CSA share, stop by the Greenmarket to pick up whatever catches your eye or find yourself unexpectedly gifted with a friends’ garden spoils. Simply flip to the section for berries, peppers or summer squash and see what Donofrio recommends. The back contains a great section of recipe variations which offers substitutions and changes depending what you have on hand, for instance, if you are craving pesto but only have mint on hand or if you’re cooking tacos but have some fresh peaches to use up.

If you are a fan of The Smile café, you will love the book Modern Mediterranean by Melia Marden, ICC Alum. If you’re not, then you have probably never been there – and what are you waiting for? It is right down the street from school! Modern Mediterranean is a beautifully designed and photographed book with lots of fresh ideas for how to use produce perfect for summer. Try the tomato, nectarine & mozzarella salad for a modern take on the caprese, grilled corn with lime butter or the rosemary and honey roasted quince. This book is not exclusively fruit and vegetable recipes, but you will find a produce focus in all the recipes included.

So whether you’re planning a fresh summer garden party or just looking to incorporate more produce in your daily dining, check out these books from the ICC library for some new and creative ideas.  To see what ICC is reading, follow us on Instagram: @intlcullibrary.

Library Notes: June 2017 [California]

Written by Savannah Sharrett
ICC Communications Liaison

View the books in our California campus library that will get you in gear for National Fruit & Veggie Month.

The Book of Greens: A Cook’s Compendium by Jenn Louis

Personally, when I think of “greens,” I imagine one of three things: collard, kale, or lettuce. Author, Jenn Louis, a Southern Californian native, comments that although having grown up in an area plentiful with green produce, it wasn’t until she traveled out of the country that she, “was delighted by the number of different varieties of greens in the markets”. She points out that North American diets tend to only include greens as salads and side dishes and shared her discovery that the rest of the world integrates them more fully. Today, in California especially, with the availability of more produce in this farmers market culture, variety is no longer our problem. As many might agree, “learning to buy and cook NEW vegetables can be intimidating”.  The table of contents lists 40 different types of greens, some I had never hear of, like Caltuce, Gai Lan, Mache, Purslane, etc. This book takes each of those and breaks them down, providing background information, what season it grows, how to choose the best quality, how to clean, store, refresh, cook and what to pair it with. Despite the few carefully thought out recipes towards the back, this book is more of an encyclopedia.


The Power of Vegetables! Turbocharged Recipes for Vegetables with Guts by Peter Meehan and the Editors of Lucky Peach

As always, Lucky Peach takes an unorthodox view of matters and I happen to be a huge fan of their style.  Most veggie cookbooks emphasize what’s in season or claim to hold the key to wellness and healthfulness but instead, Meehan states simply, “I wanted weeknight all-caps cooking for people looking to eat more vegetable-centered meals”.  It is interesting to note that although meat is primarily a non-option in this book, these recipes are not prejudiced towards the occasional toss of bacon or the use of anchovies to achieve that umami flavor we are all seeking these days. Although usually very trendy, this time Lucky Peach strays from the ever so popular grain-bowls or egg-on-top-bowls and encourages home cooks to have a broader, more international view of food without overwhelming them. For example, one might try their hand at Gomen Wat, an Ethiopian dish or Sarson Ka Saag, from the Punjab regions of India and Pakistan, and even Quiche Lorraine, a French staple.  One of the most useful parts of this book might be the list of ingredients that will make a home pantry versatile and complete such as miso, bread crumbs, capers, and shitake mushrooms.


On Vegetables by Jeremy Fox

I have definitely heard of the concepts of farm-to-table and nose-to-tail but I never thought about seed-to-stalk vegetable cooking. Author, Jeremy Fox, defines this idea in saying, “if you’re going to kill something, you @&!% better not waste any of it”. He goes further and asks, “what if cooking responsibly isn’t just about honoring things with heartbeats”? The book challenges readers not to take the easiest or standardized approach to cooking but instead to cook intentionally and deliberately; to consider how the dish today carries over to the dish tomorrow. Interestingly, Fox takes the time to explain that he is not a vegetarian nor is his book a guide to being vegetarian, rather it is a manual on how to “eat what is around you”. The onset of the book spends time paying homage to the farmers and farms that provide produce for his restaurant, Rustic Canyon located in Santa Monica, CA. The book then goes on to give tips on storage and purchasing key ingredients. Something can be said to the fact that every recipe is one page with plenty of white-space.

 

Library Notes: The Cookie Books – May 2017 [New York]

It’s almost time for the Cookie Games, the annual competition where Pastry and Culinary Students compete for celebrity judge votes and an audience favorite. The rules are simple, choose an inspirational country of origin and bake four dozen cookies, but sometimes the inspiration is not so simple. That’s why here in the ICC Library we have a great selection of cookie books to help you develop your recipe. Stop by and take a look!

Celebrity judge Dorie Greenspan knows cookies, she just released the James Beard Award-winning Dorie’s Cookies last year! This book covers classics like chocolate chip and macrons, but she also developed unique recipes such as Moroccan semolina cookies and chocolate olive cookies. With such a wide and unusual variety of cookies, it is no wonder the book is award-winning. Beyond the great recipes, Dorie covers solid tips and techniques of cookie making that will help the newbie and improve seasoned bakers.

The Gourmet Cookie Book is like a primer on the history of the United States through cookies. The book compiled the best recipe from the magazine each year from 1941 through 2009. You can see how tastes, skills, and techniques changed over time and the influences of different events throughout history.  For instance, cinnamon sugar crisps of 1944 were selected because they could be sent in parcels to troops. By the 1970’s the food processor was introduced and cookie recipes such as Kourambiedes or Greek Butter Cookies proliferated.

With a foreword from Dean Jacque Torres, you know Milk & Cookies is going to cover plenty of chocolate, and you know it’s going to be a great book. Tina Casaceli does indeed include recipes for double chocolate chip mint cookies and coconut macaroons (dipped in chocolate) but she also features cookies with baked chow mein and honey lavender shortbread. The book is divided by base dough, be it vanilla, oatmeal or peanut butter. Each chapter then offers multiple variations on that base, perfect if you need guidance on how to tweak a recipe you already have to make it, even more, competition worthy!

If you are curious which cookies are favored in the kitchens of your favorite restaurants, check out One Sweet Cookie from Tracey Zaber.  Chefs from such celebrated restaurants as Eleven Madison Park, Blue Hill at Stone Barns and Le Bernadain all contribute recipes. Even our very own deans, Alain Sailhac, Andre Soltner and Jacques Torres submitted their picks for the favorite cookie. So, what do they choose? Well, you will just have to come and borrow the book to find out.

Library Notes California – April 2017

Written by: Savannah Sharrett
California Campus | Communications Liaison

April is all about Health and Nutrition! There’s no one diet that is right for everyone, so it’s important to follow a healthful eating plan that’s packed with tasty foods and that keeps your unique lifestyle in mind. Chefs and all culinary professionals have the ability to not only bring joy by means of taste, but they can also improve the lives of their customers and their community!


The Anti-Inflammation Cookbook: The Delicious Way to Reduce Inflammation and Stay Healthy
by Amanda Haas with Dr. Bradly Jacobs

The preface written by Dr. Jacobs and Amanda Haas personal story sets a tone of honesty. Dr. Jacobs notes that although being a Stanford Medical School Graduate, he had learned to apply a balance of conventional medical therapies alternative medicine therapies, and lifestyle therapies. In his 15 years of experience, he realized that there are many modifiable factors he calls, “upstream events,” that occur before a person seeks out medical treatment. Author Amanda Hass shares the story of her personal struggle with health issues and her understanding of what inflammation really means. As Culinary Director for Williams-Sonoma and professional cook, Amanda shares her realization that she should have realized the connection between what she ate and how she felt sooner. What stands out most in this book is the detailed yet clear list of foods that contribute to more or less inflammation in the body. Together, Amanda and Dr. Jacobs put together a cookbook that makes the simple the connection between our diet and our overall well-being.


ca-library-notes-04-2017-books-2The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen, Second Edition: Nourishing, Big-Flavor Recipes for Cancer Treatment and Recovery by Rebecca Katz

In the foreword, Author Rebecca Katz uses a simple simile to help readers understand the impact thoughtful eating habits when one is dealing with cancer. She explains, “cancer is like a weed in the body’s garden”, and her job, “is to work with their garden to make its solid as inhospitable as possible to the growth and spread of the weed”.  This book addresses not only those currently going through the cancer treatment process but also those who may be in a care-takers position. Rebecca encourages readers to use her book as a toolbox full of ideas that make eating and cooking less stressful during a time one may be feeling overwhelmed and most definitely fatigued. One thing that stands out the most in the book is the index of recipes organized according to side effects.


Good Clean Food: Super Simple Plant-Based Recipes for Every Day by Lily Kunin

This book is an excellent example how a social media account can lead to bigger things. Lily Kunin, Health Coach, and Instagram-er turned cookbook Author, writes from personal experience dealing with migraine headaches that severely affected her life. She shares with readers how she discovered, “the connection between what [she] put in her body and how it made [her] feel”. Lily admits at the onset of her book that everyone will have different needs and will have different experiences when it comes to health and nutrition. With this in mind, the contents of her book are divided into 6 major sections focusing on a variety of needs whether it’s detoxing with a “super green smoothie” and  “mom’s minestrone” or restoring with a “smashed avocado toast” and “red lentil earth curry”. What makes her book unique is that she not only created a repertoire of delicious meal ideas but she also touches on natural beauty tips such as her recipe for a “coconut coffee body scrub” or a “brightening free tea face mask”.


Naturally Nourished: Healthy, Delicious Meals Made with Everyday Ingredients by Sarah Britton

Realizing that not everyone has time or interest in combing through their local grocery store or farmers market for special ingredients, Sarah Britton creatively shows readers how to put together nourishing meals with ingredients they may already have at home. She teaches home cooks how to start with basic concepts and build up with her Building Block chart. She also spends time explain methods that increase flavor without the use of extra equipment or a long list of ingredients.


Deliciously Ella Every Day: Quick and Easy Recipes for Gluten-Free Snacks, Packed Lunches and Simple Meals by Ella Woodward

Another success story from someone who worked through a personal heath obstacle. Author Ella Woodward emphasizes that, with a little organization, “taking care of yourself is much easier that you think”. For readers with busy lives, Ella includes a section of on-the-go recipes that will help you keep the focus on health even though you may have limited time. In the introduction, she includes tips on advance preparation, storage solutions, creating a well stocked and diverse pantry. One section that I look forward to trying personally is her list of soothing drinks such as her “warm beet and apple juice” or her “warming turmeric tonic”. This book is not only practical and useful recipe ideas but also packed with gorgeous photos.


To connect with the California Campus on Instagram, follow @iccedu_ca

Library Notes: Women’s History Month [March 2017]

Written by Sara Quiroz
ICC Librarian

In honor of Women’s History Month, we are highlighting several female authors from our collection.

Women Chefs of New York by Nadia Armugam profiles some of the biggest chefs in the city, including alums Jean Adamson and Christina Tosi. Each profile includes a personal history of the chef, info about where they are cooking now and several of their favorite recipes. Try out some diverse and tasty dishes from your favorite female fronted kitchens such as rabbit stroganoff, smoked duck soba and peaches and cream cookies. The recipes included are as unique as the stories of the women behind them.

photosbyarielle-20Cooking without Borders by Anita Lo “Food, like language, is constantly evolving. It is a living entity that grows and changes at each individual stove-top, at the hands of cooks across the globe,” so says Anita Lo in the introduction to this beautiful cookbook. To call her style fusion cuisine is an oversimplification because, as she says, all cuisine is fusion. Every style of cooking is influenced by others as cuisine truly knows no borders.  Check out her beautifully designed book for recipes like foie gras soup dumplings, braised pork cheeks in caramel and crisp warm sesame mocha.  Anita will also be speaking on our upcoming Food for Thought panel.

Mastering My Mistakes in the Kitchen by Dana Cowin
Longtime editor of Food & Wine, it was a shameful secret that Dana Cowin could not cook. She decided to up her game and learn from the pros – including ICC Deans Jacques Pepin, Jose Andres and Cesare Casella as well as alumni David Chang , Dan Barber and Zak Pelaccio. The book is fun and approachable for the new cook but seasoned foodies will love it for the insider secrets of their favorite chefs. Did you know Chef Cesare Casella freezes his cooked beans in their liquid? Mario Batali cuts up overcooked pasta, breads and fries it. These and many more tips and tricks from great chefs in addition to approachable yet unique recipes (hello Jerk Lamb!) are all included in Mastering My Mistakes in the Kitchen. Dana will be moderating our upcoming food for thought panel.

Four Kitchens by Lauren Shockey Have you ever dreamed of living around the world? Alum Lauren Shockey did just that. After completing her culinary education she went to work in kitchens in New York, Hanoi, Tel Aviv and Paris. Interspersed with her grand adventure are recipes inspired by each city. An ode to life on the line, Lauren shows that no matter how different we may be, there is always common ground in the kitchen.

Girl Hunter by Georgia Pellegrini
Part memoir and part how to guide, Girl Hunter chronicles Georgia Pellegrini’s experience learning how to hunt and all the characters she met along the way. It also includes multiple recipes, from whiskey glazed turkey breast to squirrel dumplings. She also includes helpful charts of game meat characteristics and which substitutions will be successful in the recipes and useful equipment for the haute cuisine hunter.

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