Library Notes: June 2017 [New York]

As the weather turns warmer I find myself craving fresh fruits and vegetables more than any other time of the year, and I am always looking for ways to avoid turning on the oven and heating up the kitchen! If you’re like me, you will find plenty of recipe options to do just that right here in the ICC library!

Alice Waters is probably the undisputed queen of highlighting the beauty of seasonal produce. She was smuggling baby greens into the US before they were available in supermarkets and was the first to serve a simple piece of fresh fruit for dessert after a multi-course meal; who better to turn to for fruit advice? Chez Panisse Fruit includes not just recipes but encyclopedic coverage of everything from Apples to Quinces. Each section highlights Waters’ favorite varieties and multiple ways to prepare them. As a bonus, the book also includes some basic recipes you can enhance with your fruit of choice. Try the Chez Panisse take on galette or frangipane then top with your favorite fresh summer fruit. As a bonus, familiarize yourself with Alice Waters and the Chez Panisse story in preparation for her forthcoming memoir, due out this fall!

In Season by Rob Patronite and Robin Raisfeld is the hyper-local source you have always looked for. This compilation of the column by the same name highlights various unique ingredients that can be sourced from New York City Farmers Markets along with flavor profiles, growing season and a recipe contributed by a celebrity chef. So pick up this book to try Daniel Humm’s Strawberry Gazpacho, Jody Williams’s Raw Artichoke Salad or Alex Raij’s Stuffed Avocado Squash.

Instead of being organized by the classic headings of appetizers, entrées and desserts, The Love & Lemons Cookbook by Jeanine Donofrio is divided up by fruit or vegetable! This is ideal for if you receive a CSA share, stop by the Greenmarket to pick up whatever catches your eye or find yourself unexpectedly gifted with a friends’ garden spoils. Simply flip to the section for berries, peppers or summer squash and see what Donofrio recommends. The back contains a great section of recipe variations which offers substitutions and changes depending what you have on hand, for instance, if you are craving pesto but only have mint on hand or if you’re cooking tacos but have some fresh peaches to use up.

If you are a fan of The Smile café, you will love the book Modern Mediterranean by Melia Marden, ICC Alum. If you’re not, then you have probably never been there – and what are you waiting for? It is right down the street from school! Modern Mediterranean is a beautifully designed and photographed book with lots of fresh ideas for how to use produce perfect for summer. Try the tomato, nectarine & mozzarella salad for a modern take on the caprese, grilled corn with lime butter or the rosemary and honey roasted quince. This book is not exclusively fruit and vegetable recipes, but you will find a produce focus in all the recipes included.

So whether you’re planning a fresh summer garden party or just looking to incorporate more produce in your daily dining, check out these books from the ICC library for some new and creative ideas.  To see what ICC is reading, follow us on Instagram: @intlcullibrary.

Library Notes: June 2017 [California]

Written by Savannah Sharrett
ICC Communications Liaison

View the books in our California campus library that will get you in gear for National Fruit & Veggie Month.

The Book of Greens: A Cook’s Compendium by Jenn Louis

Personally, when I think of “greens,” I imagine one of three things: collard, kale, or lettuce. Author, Jenn Louis, a Southern Californian native, comments that although having grown up in an area plentiful with green produce, it wasn’t until she traveled out of the country that she, “was delighted by the number of different varieties of greens in the markets”. She points out that North American diets tend to only include greens as salads and side dishes and shared her discovery that the rest of the world integrates them more fully. Today, in California especially, with the availability of more produce in this farmers market culture, variety is no longer our problem. As many might agree, “learning to buy and cook NEW vegetables can be intimidating”.  The table of contents lists 40 different types of greens, some I had never hear of, like Caltuce, Gai Lan, Mache, Purslane, etc. This book takes each of those and breaks them down, providing background information, what season it grows, how to choose the best quality, how to clean, store, refresh, cook and what to pair it with. Despite the few carefully thought out recipes towards the back, this book is more of an encyclopedia.


The Power of Vegetables! Turbocharged Recipes for Vegetables with Guts by Peter Meehan and the Editors of Lucky Peach

As always, Lucky Peach takes an unorthodox view of matters and I happen to be a huge fan of their style.  Most veggie cookbooks emphasize what’s in season or claim to hold the key to wellness and healthfulness but instead, Meehan states simply, “I wanted weeknight all-caps cooking for people looking to eat more vegetable-centered meals”.  It is interesting to note that although meat is primarily a non-option in this book, these recipes are not prejudiced towards the occasional toss of bacon or the use of anchovies to achieve that umami flavor we are all seeking these days. Although usually very trendy, this time Lucky Peach strays from the ever so popular grain-bowls or egg-on-top-bowls and encourages home cooks to have a broader, more international view of food without overwhelming them. For example, one might try their hand at Gomen Wat, an Ethiopian dish or Sarson Ka Saag, from the Punjab regions of India and Pakistan, and even Quiche Lorraine, a French staple.  One of the most useful parts of this book might be the list of ingredients that will make a home pantry versatile and complete such as miso, bread crumbs, capers, and shitake mushrooms.


On Vegetables by Jeremy Fox

I have definitely heard of the concepts of farm-to-table and nose-to-tail but I never thought about seed-to-stalk vegetable cooking. Author, Jeremy Fox, defines this idea in saying, “if you’re going to kill something, you @&!% better not waste any of it”. He goes further and asks, “what if cooking responsibly isn’t just about honoring things with heartbeats”? The book challenges readers not to take the easiest or standardized approach to cooking but instead to cook intentionally and deliberately; to consider how the dish today carries over to the dish tomorrow. Interestingly, Fox takes the time to explain that he is not a vegetarian nor is his book a guide to being vegetarian, rather it is a manual on how to “eat what is around you”. The onset of the book spends time paying homage to the farmers and farms that provide produce for his restaurant, Rustic Canyon located in Santa Monica, CA. The book then goes on to give tips on storage and purchasing key ingredients. Something can be said to the fact that every recipe is one page with plenty of white-space.

 

Library Notes: The Cookie Books – May 2017 [New York]

It’s almost time for the Cookie Games, the annual competition where Pastry and Culinary Students compete for celebrity judge votes and an audience favorite. The rules are simple, choose an inspirational country of origin and bake four dozen cookies, but sometimes the inspiration is not so simple. That’s why here in the ICC Library we have a great selection of cookie books to help you develop your recipe. Stop by and take a look!

Celebrity judge Dorie Greenspan knows cookies, she just released the James Beard Award-winning Dorie’s Cookies last year! This book covers classics like chocolate chip and macrons, but she also developed unique recipes such as Moroccan semolina cookies and chocolate olive cookies. With such a wide and unusual variety of cookies, it is no wonder the book is award-winning. Beyond the great recipes, Dorie covers solid tips and techniques of cookie making that will help the newbie and improve seasoned bakers.

The Gourmet Cookie Book is like a primer on the history of the United States through cookies. The book compiled the best recipe from the magazine each year from 1941 through 2009. You can see how tastes, skills, and techniques changed over time and the influences of different events throughout history.  For instance, cinnamon sugar crisps of 1944 were selected because they could be sent in parcels to troops. By the 1970’s the food processor was introduced and cookie recipes such as Kourambiedes or Greek Butter Cookies proliferated.

With a foreword from Dean Jacque Torres, you know Milk & Cookies is going to cover plenty of chocolate, and you know it’s going to be a great book. Tina Casaceli does indeed include recipes for double chocolate chip mint cookies and coconut macaroons (dipped in chocolate) but she also features cookies with baked chow mein and honey lavender shortbread. The book is divided by base dough, be it vanilla, oatmeal or peanut butter. Each chapter then offers multiple variations on that base, perfect if you need guidance on how to tweak a recipe you already have to make it, even more, competition worthy!

If you are curious which cookies are favored in the kitchens of your favorite restaurants, check out One Sweet Cookie from Tracey Zaber.  Chefs from such celebrated restaurants as Eleven Madison Park, Blue Hill at Stone Barns and Le Bernadain all contribute recipes. Even our very own deans, Alain Sailhac, Andre Soltner and Jacques Torres submitted their picks for the favorite cookie. So, what do they choose? Well, you will just have to come and borrow the book to find out.

Library Notes: BBQ and Brews – May 2017 [California]

Written by: Savannah Sharrett
California Campus | Communications Liaison

The Secrets of Master Brewers: Techniques, Traditions, and Homebrew Recipes for 26 of the World’s Classic Beer Styles by Jeff Alworth

It wasn’t until the last few years that it has become “cool” to know about beer. Even for those who are not necessarily interested in brewing their own beer, the food history content included catches my interest. This book examines 7 major traditions and their relative subcategories that beer might fall under British, German, Czech, Belgian, French & Italian, American and “Brewing Wild”. Author Jeff Alworth notes that during the research process for this book and his previous, Beer Bible, he discovered that there were contradictions in methods between professional brewers, each one believing his own was correct. He explains how the varieties of styles are a result of the regional and national ways of thinking about beer. It was fascinating for me to learn that the study of beer and brewing is actually quite established and extensive. The forward includes the thoughts from a university instructor, John Isenhour, who conducts classes on both the scientific and cultural aspects of brewing. Each chapter of this book begins with an introduction to the region and gives a general view of why it’s unique. The chapters go deeper into understanding the unique brewing process by breaking it down into malt, mash, boil, fermentation/conditioning, sugars, yeast, and packaging. Despite this book being data heavy, there is an enjoyable amount of food and beverage history that lends to understanding the social and economic aspects of each region.


Tasting Beer: An Insider’s Guide to the World’s Greatest Drink (2nd Edition) by Randy Mosher

Author Randy Mosher urges, “Don’t even consider starting this book without a beer in your hand”. For those of us who struggle to describe why one beer is better than the next, this book provides clear and logical tools to help us be more decisive. One feature that stood out to me the most was the “Beer Aroma Spiral”: A diagram that identifies 11 common base aromas that beer tasters will experience. The diagrams in this book are really what make this book useful. From a scale of beer coloring to a bitterness ratio chart, the haze of beer identification and classification is made clear. Mosher provides the reader with an understanding of the terminology used by the professionals. Just as when a Sommelier identifies a wine, a Cicerone can deconstruct a beer into 9 aspects: aroma, head, color, carbonation, body, mouth feel, flavor alcohol and taste. For the foodies out there, Chapter 7 explains the argument of why beer and food are the perfect matches.  Mosher encourages finding the harmony between the dish and chosen beverage and he gives excellent pairing suggestions.


The Homebrewer’s Almanac: A Seasonal Guide to Making Your Own Beer from Scratch by Marika Josephson, Aaron Kleidon, and Ryan Tockstein

Creative inspiration can definitely be triggered by the environment around us and, looking back at the product can be a testament to our journey. The Homebrewer’s Almanac takes a more naturalistic view of brewing as the authors note in the preface, “carrying on the heritage of ancient traditions brings us closer to the long life cycle of the plants we briefly live with side-by-side”. They encourage seasonality and making the most of what flavors naturally occur at different times of the year. As I am sure most chefs would agree, cooking with freshest ingredients brings out the most flavor possible. The same goes for brewing beer; The quality of the final product can significantly decrease if one uses a hop that was picked, shipped and stored for who knows how long versus a hop that was just picked and immediately used. The Authors also give the readers tips on how to apply this concept via buying local and foraging. This book chronicles a 6-year collection of unique beer recipes that use seasonal ingredients. Some examples are a winter “Sweet Potato Vienne, American Ale”, a spring “Dandelion Tonic, British Ale”, a summer “Chanterelle Biere de Garde, German Alt” and a fall “Pumpkin Seed Ale, British Ale”.


Pitmaster: Recipes, Techniques and Barbeque Wisdom by Andy Husbands and Chris Hart

Barbecue is not a new invention. As noted in the foreword, “the cooking and the culture…are inextricably entwined and deeply rooted in heritage and history”. That makes me wonder why then, has barbecue become such a cornerstone of food culture? Mike Mills, four-time World BBQ Champion and owner of several restaurants gave one explanation: “folks are flocking to barbecues in search of sustenance and community…it wraps you in warmth and belonging”. Pitmaster begins with a lesson on equipment and emphasizes that fire control, clean charcoal, seasoned wood and proper airflow are all key. The photography in this book is particularly notable. I wouldn’t recommend flipping through on an empty stomach as the images, although technically being one-dimensional, capture bold 3D flavor! One recipe that is on my to-do list is the “Burnt Ends”. Interestingly, there is a recipe for “Smoke Shop Hot Links” that really teaches readers how to grind meat and smoke sausages (Hog-sausage-casing and all…).


Project Smoke: Seven Steps to Smokes Food Nirvana, Plus 100 Irresistible Recipes from Classic to Adventurous by Steven Raichlen

Now on his tenth book on the subject, Steven Raichlen focuses in on smoking techniques. Whether its beef, pork and lamb or vegetables and desserts, this book provides a crash course in everything smoke related. Recognizing that the technique had been evolving over a long period of time, Raichlen clarifies what smoke really is at the onset of the book. In a chart entitled, “A Brief Science Lesson—What is Smoke and Why Does it Taste So Good,” the reader comes to understand that smoke essentially happens when you burn wood. The variation of taste lies within the type of wood, the size of the wood pieces, the equipment used and the airflow.  For those who may already have knowledge on the subject, the conversion tables and study of types of smokers may be most useful. The book provides a complete picture to a successful meal as it provides suggestions for starters, main dishes, desserts, and cocktails.


BBQ Rules: the Old-School Guide to Smoking Meat by Myron Mixton 

As a winner of more barbecue competitions that anyone else in the world, Myron Mixton certainly knows his subject. What I appreciate about this book, in comparison to others on meat smoking, is that Mixton takes a butcher’s approach, dividing his recipes and how-to’s by animal and by cuts of meat. For example, chapter 2 on “The Hog” is broken down to the whole-hog, hog parts (shoulder, spare ribs, tails, ham, etc), and hog-extras (snout, skin, etc). Mixton encourages readers and new smokers to be involved with the whole process and avoid taking shortcuts. He is a believer in cooking outside, making your own coal, and building your own pit. He comments that many today over complicate the technique, often adding exotic ingredients and extra steps. In his book, Mixton takes readers, “back to the way real barbecue is done” and encourages always relating your processes back to, “the old-school way of doing things”.


 

 

Library Notes California – April 2017

Written by: Savannah Sharrett
California Campus | Communications Liaison

April is all about Health and Nutrition! There’s no one diet that is right for everyone, so it’s important to follow a healthful eating plan that’s packed with tasty foods and that keeps your unique lifestyle in mind. Chefs and all culinary professionals have the ability to not only bring joy by means of taste, but they can also improve the lives of their customers and their community!


The Anti-Inflammation Cookbook: The Delicious Way to Reduce Inflammation and Stay Healthy
by Amanda Haas with Dr. Bradly Jacobs

The preface written by Dr. Jacobs and Amanda Haas personal story sets a tone of honesty. Dr. Jacobs notes that although being a Stanford Medical School Graduate, he had learned to apply a balance of conventional medical therapies alternative medicine therapies, and lifestyle therapies. In his 15 years of experience, he realized that there are many modifiable factors he calls, “upstream events,” that occur before a person seeks out medical treatment. Author Amanda Hass shares the story of her personal struggle with health issues and her understanding of what inflammation really means. As Culinary Director for Williams-Sonoma and professional cook, Amanda shares her realization that she should have realized the connection between what she ate and how she felt sooner. What stands out most in this book is the detailed yet clear list of foods that contribute to more or less inflammation in the body. Together, Amanda and Dr. Jacobs put together a cookbook that makes the simple the connection between our diet and our overall well-being.


ca-library-notes-04-2017-books-2The Cancer-Fighting Kitchen, Second Edition: Nourishing, Big-Flavor Recipes for Cancer Treatment and Recovery by Rebecca Katz

In the foreword, Author Rebecca Katz uses a simple simile to help readers understand the impact thoughtful eating habits when one is dealing with cancer. She explains, “cancer is like a weed in the body’s garden”, and her job, “is to work with their garden to make its solid as inhospitable as possible to the growth and spread of the weed”.  This book addresses not only those currently going through the cancer treatment process but also those who may be in a care-takers position. Rebecca encourages readers to use her book as a toolbox full of ideas that make eating and cooking less stressful during a time one may be feeling overwhelmed and most definitely fatigued. One thing that stands out the most in the book is the index of recipes organized according to side effects.


Good Clean Food: Super Simple Plant-Based Recipes for Every Day by Lily Kunin

This book is an excellent example how a social media account can lead to bigger things. Lily Kunin, Health Coach, and Instagram-er turned cookbook Author, writes from personal experience dealing with migraine headaches that severely affected her life. She shares with readers how she discovered, “the connection between what [she] put in her body and how it made [her] feel”. Lily admits at the onset of her book that everyone will have different needs and will have different experiences when it comes to health and nutrition. With this in mind, the contents of her book are divided into 6 major sections focusing on a variety of needs whether it’s detoxing with a “super green smoothie” and  “mom’s minestrone” or restoring with a “smashed avocado toast” and “red lentil earth curry”. What makes her book unique is that she not only created a repertoire of delicious meal ideas but she also touches on natural beauty tips such as her recipe for a “coconut coffee body scrub” or a “brightening free tea face mask”.


Naturally Nourished: Healthy, Delicious Meals Made with Everyday Ingredients by Sarah Britton

Realizing that not everyone has time or interest in combing through their local grocery store or farmers market for special ingredients, Sarah Britton creatively shows readers how to put together nourishing meals with ingredients they may already have at home. She teaches home cooks how to start with basic concepts and build up with her Building Block chart. She also spends time explain methods that increase flavor without the use of extra equipment or a long list of ingredients.


Deliciously Ella Every Day: Quick and Easy Recipes for Gluten-Free Snacks, Packed Lunches and Simple Meals by Ella Woodward

Another success story from someone who worked through a personal heath obstacle. Author Ella Woodward emphasizes that, with a little organization, “taking care of yourself is much easier that you think”. For readers with busy lives, Ella includes a section of on-the-go recipes that will help you keep the focus on health even though you may have limited time. In the introduction, she includes tips on advance preparation, storage solutions, creating a well stocked and diverse pantry. One section that I look forward to trying personally is her list of soothing drinks such as her “warm beet and apple juice” or her “warming turmeric tonic”. This book is not only practical and useful recipe ideas but also packed with gorgeous photos.


To connect with the California Campus on Instagram, follow @iccedu_ca

Library Notes: Women’s History Month [March 2017]

Written by Sara Quiroz
ICC Librarian

In honor of Women’s History Month, we are highlighting several female authors from our collection.

Women Chefs of New York by Nadia Armugam profiles some of the biggest chefs in the city, including alums Jean Adamson and Christina Tosi. Each profile includes a personal history of the chef, info about where they are cooking now and several of their favorite recipes. Try out some diverse and tasty dishes from your favorite female fronted kitchens such as rabbit stroganoff, smoked duck soba and peaches and cream cookies. The recipes included are as unique as the stories of the women behind them.

photosbyarielle-20Cooking without Borders by Anita Lo “Food, like language, is constantly evolving. It is a living entity that grows and changes at each individual stove-top, at the hands of cooks across the globe,” so says Anita Lo in the introduction to this beautiful cookbook. To call her style fusion cuisine is an oversimplification because, as she says, all cuisine is fusion. Every style of cooking is influenced by others as cuisine truly knows no borders.  Check out her beautifully designed book for recipes like foie gras soup dumplings, braised pork cheeks in caramel and crisp warm sesame mocha.  Anita will also be speaking on our upcoming Food for Thought panel.

Mastering My Mistakes in the Kitchen by Dana Cowin
Longtime editor of Food & Wine, it was a shameful secret that Dana Cowin could not cook. She decided to up her game and learn from the pros – including ICC Deans Jacques Pepin, Jose Andres and Cesare Casella as well as alumni David Chang , Dan Barber and Zak Pelaccio. The book is fun and approachable for the new cook but seasoned foodies will love it for the insider secrets of their favorite chefs. Did you know Chef Cesare Casella freezes his cooked beans in their liquid? Mario Batali cuts up overcooked pasta, breads and fries it. These and many more tips and tricks from great chefs in addition to approachable yet unique recipes (hello Jerk Lamb!) are all included in Mastering My Mistakes in the Kitchen. Dana will be moderating our upcoming food for thought panel.

Four Kitchens by Lauren Shockey Have you ever dreamed of living around the world? Alum Lauren Shockey did just that. After completing her culinary education she went to work in kitchens in New York, Hanoi, Tel Aviv and Paris. Interspersed with her grand adventure are recipes inspired by each city. An ode to life on the line, Lauren shows that no matter how different we may be, there is always common ground in the kitchen.

Girl Hunter by Georgia Pellegrini
Part memoir and part how to guide, Girl Hunter chronicles Georgia Pellegrini’s experience learning how to hunt and all the characters she met along the way. It also includes multiple recipes, from whiskey glazed turkey breast to squirrel dumplings. She also includes helpful charts of game meat characteristics and which substitutions will be successful in the recipes and useful equipment for the haute cuisine hunter.

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Library Notes: Local Roots + Local Farms [February 2017]

Written by Sara Quiroz
ICC Librarian

In this edition of library notes, we will highlight some selections from Local Roots Founder and Friend of the Library, Wen-Jay Ying. Do you know about Local Roots NYC? It is a CSA or community supported agriculture connecting New Yorkers with fresh produce and other goodies from local farms. We have a pick up location right here at ICC! When Wen-Jay isn’t trekking up to farms, maintaining the super fun social profiles or producing her radio show, Food Stripped Naked she sometimes does her admin work right out of the ICC library! If you want to bring a #soiltocity perspective into your own kitchen, check out her recommended reading list below, all available for circulation here in the library.

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The Food Lab by J.Kenji Lopez-Alt

Last year’s James Beard Award Winner, this book covers just about anything and everything in the culinary world. With essential techniques, ingredient advice and tasty, very well tested recipes it could easily be your only cookbook. It also makes an excellent starter for new homecooks but still has the science and test kitchen detail to intrigue seasoned chefs. Wen-Jay particularly loves that he explains both how and why various food preparations work.

The Food Substitutions Bible by David Joachim

This guide contains simple substitutions for any ingredient, equiptment or technique you may be missing from Atemoya to a zester. This book is important to Wen-Jay because sometimes trying to cook with only local ingredients can make recipes feel confining, but learning the substitutions can give you more flexibility in the kitchen and empower you to be a versatile chef with your Local Roots NYC produce.  “Cooking does not need high-end appliances or an infinite supply of spices or specific vegetable varieties. Let your taste buds and this book guide you to be more flexible in the kitchen, “ said Wen-Jay.

The Frugal Colonial Housewife by Susannah Carter

This book is also one of my favorites and a fun glimpse into the past through food. It was the first truly American cookbook published in the colonies, back when everyone was trying to recreate British style cooking. Carter introduced local ingredients which new arrivals from England weren’t familiar with such as pumpkin and corn. Something unique you will notice is that the style of writing recipes was very different. They offer vague ingredient description (something green, a piece of meat) as it was difficult to produce specific items. The instruction is also much less detailed than we expect today, most women learned everything from their families and never needed written instruction on technique. Says Wen-Jay, “Love that Sara introduced me to this cookbook when interviewing her on my radio show! People used to cook with stripped down recipes because everyone had basic culinary skills and “farm to table” was the only way to cook.”

The Kitchen Ecosystem by Eugenia Bone
“LOCAL ROOTS NYC LOVES SUSTAINABLE COOKING! We recently hosted a cooking club because 85% of food waste happens on the consumer end between home chefs, restaurants, etc.” said Wen-Jay. If you find yourself in that very predicament, pick up the Kitchen Ecosystem. Bone explains sustainable meal planning and various ways to use every ingredient. For each item listed, she details how to prepare it fresh, how to preserve it and how to use scraps then lists several recipes for each incarnation. Organized by ingredient, The Kitchen Ecosystem covers produce, fish and meat with enough variations to suit every palate.

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Setting the Table by Danny Meyer

For a guide on successfully providing excellent hospitality and to understand the success of Meyers ventures, check out Setting the Table. He lays out his philosophy of “enlightened hospitality” or connecting deeply with customers through small details, creating a nurturing work culture and building community. Says Wen-Jay, “At Local Roots NYC, we believe that constantly reimagining our food system is necessary for its longevity. We’ve reimagined the traditional CSA model and continue to mature and mo It brings us joy to show appreciation to our customers and have built meaningful relationships with our customers and producers with some practices mentioned in this book.”
The Unsettling of America by Wendell Berry

Wen-Jay considers this seminal text her bible and tries to read some every morning. This book was the inspiration for much of the Local Roots value system. Barry considers good farming to be a cultural development and a spiritual discipline. Says Wen-Jay, “He emphasizes the importance of regional systems, making decisions not based on short term needs but long term commitments, and makes parallels between the health of farms with the vitality in life.”

How did you like our guest contributor? Who else would you like to see a reading list from, contact Sara the Librarian with your suggestions squiroz@culinarycenter.com and follow the library on Instagram for more @IntlCulLibrary

Library Notes: New Books for November 2016

Written by: Kate Heenan
ICC Library Intern

dsc_00561Adventures of Fat Rice

Fans of restaurant cook books and graphic novels alike, check out our new book The Adventures of Fat Rice.  Conlon, Lo and Amano put together some of the favorite recipes from the Chicago restaurant, Fat Rice, with a focus on Macanese food.  The book itself is put together like an omnibus of a comic series.  The chapters include 100 recipes spanning from pickles and preserves and appetizers to desserts with a helpful building blocks chapter included at the end. Each chapter not only offers up some great recipes or “adventures”, but incredible graphics, photographs and theories about etymology and origin of the dishes included.  Be sure to check out all the adventures The Adventures of Fat Rice has to offer from the Asparagus Invasion to Attack of the Chili Clam.

dsc_00431Ferment, Pickle, Dry

Ferment, Pickle, Dry: Ancient Methods, Modern Meals by Simon Poffley and Gaba Smolinksa-Poffley offers a simple and exciting guide book for preserving enthusiast.  The book includes an introduction to the ancient methods of fermenting, pickling, and drying food along with reasons why they are not just a passing fad.  Recipes included are not only staples, including basic kombucha recipes, but new and clever creations such as a sour grape pickle-tini. Included are dual recipes, where everything can be incorporated into main dishes, making sure that no jar remains unused.

DALI: Les Diners de Gala

Fans of the painter Salvador Dali will be excited to know that Dali: Les Diners de Gala has finally been republished! One glance at the cover lets a reader know they are going on a surreal culinary adventure; one that only Dali, himself, could have created. The book includes all of the original 136 recipes, plus bizarre and genius artistic renderings by Dali.  Recipes span from exotic dishes to meals to aphrodisiacs.  To quote Dali himself, “Les dîners de Gala is uniquely devoted to the pleasures of taste … If you are a disciple of one of those calorie-counters who turn the joys of eating into a form of punishment, close this book at once; it is too lively, too aggressive, and far too impertinent for you.”


dsc_00821The Chef’s Library

Ever wonder what your favorite Chef’s favorite cookbook is?  Well wonder no more.  Jenny Linford’s The Chef’s Library: Favorite Cookbooks from the World’s Great Kitchens does just that.  Linford interviews over 70 Chefs explaining why and what they love about their pick from Darina Allen talking about The Ballymaloe Cookbook to Michael Wignall ‘s explain how the story is also important in his pick, Origin.  Chapter 2 includes over 50 of the most influential cookbooks ever written with a brief history of the Chef and book included.  Her last chapter is a Cookbook Directory organized by Country, time and specialty.  Be sure to see if you favorite stacks up!

The Science of Wine

Jamie Goode, a widely respected authority on wine science, just came out with his second edition for The Science of Wine: From Vine to Glass.  This edition includes everything we loved about the first edition’s groundbreaking reference giving information about the science of wine, ecological impacts on the future of wine making, and new technological trends.  The new edition includes a new chapter on soils and vines, oxygen management, and a linguist view for describing wine.  It also includes hot topics that the last edition wasn’t able to include such as genetically modified grapevines, the future of the cork, and more.

These and many more can be found in the “New Books” display in the ICC library! Follow @IntlCulLibrary on Twitter and Instagram for more updates.

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ICC Librarian Sara Quiroz Takes Over Book Riot Live

Written by Sara Quiroz
ICC Librarian

This weekend I have the great honor of participating in one of my favorite events presented by one of my favorite websites. Your humble librarian will be at Book Riot Live, the annual conference presented by the reading renegades over at Book Riot. My space here in ICC has been called the heart of the school a peaceful hideout and an aquarium, I am so thrilled to have the opportunity to share that with the outside world and welcome them into this special space we have built. While the focus is not culinary, I know many of my library regulars love books outside the culinary world and I’m sure it will be of interest to many.

Here are a few highlights below. For the full schedule, check here: http://bookriotlive.com

On Friday, Nov 10th Sommelier and Author Diane McMartin will be hosting an event called Books & Booze during which she will offer wine pairings for various books followed by readings by the authors.  This event will take place at the Strand at 7pm. Click here to join

On Saturday Nov 11th, I’ll be hosting a meet up in the commons at 11:30am. Scrumptious Prose is for cookbook collectors and fans of food writing. http://bookriotlive.com/bird-plane-commons-schedule/

For fans of our How to Write a Cookbook series, also on Saturday from 1:15 to 2:05pm will be Farm to Table: How a Book Gets Made during which a panel of experts from the field will discuss every step of the process. Hear from small press, packaging, editing and marketing professionals!  http://bookriotlive.com/sessions/farm-table-book-gets-made/

To hear more about me and what I do here come see me speak on the panel Libraries, Beyond the Books on Sunday at noon. I will be speaking on a panel with two other librarians about how libraries are changing and modernizing. http://bookriotlive.com/sessions/libraries-beyond-books/

These and a plethora of fantastic programming will all be taking place over this weekend. I attended as a visitor last year and had a really great time. I am thrilled I was invited to participate this year. I would love to see some friendly ICC faces in the crowd and Book Riot has generously given me an ICC discount code of “cookthebooks” use it to save $20 off admission.

 

2 Days Away!

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Library Notes: Books to Elevate Your Thanksgiving

Whether you are cooking a full spread for your family, bringing a side dish to a casual “Friends-giving” or thankfully spending a rare day off alone at home the ICC Library has you covered for Thanksgiving. From start to finish we have books for whichever blank you need to fill in. Of course you wouldn’t dream of using anything but Grandma Myrtle’s Mashed Potatoes, but maybe your pie selection needs an upgrade.  Stop by to check out these and more.

Get the day started by whipping up a few of these amazing drinks from ICC Alum Maria Del Mar Sacasa in Winter Cocktails. Keep your drunk uncle happy and conversation flowing with Hot Mulled Wine (classic, or try a white version featuring pears,) Hot Buttered Rum or several variations on Spiced Cider.

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There are many authoritative guides on start to finish Thanksgiving out there. The advantage being all you need is in one book, you don’t need a pile of various bookmarked cookbooks or hand scribbled recipes all over the place. Of these, my favorite is Thanksgiving: How to Cook it Well by Sam Sifton. His work on the New York Times dining section ensured that this self proclaimed, “One man Thanksgiving help-line” has seen it all. This slim volume will not take over your workspace, yet it includes all the essential classics as well as modern twists and fun variations.

The Four & Twenty Blackbirds Pie Book by Emily Elsen & Melissa Elsen covers favorites from the eponymous Brooklyn pie and coffee shop divided by season. The Elsen sisters make it a priority to utilize seasonal produce, just like their grandmother did. In the Fall & Winter sections you will find many new options to jazz up your Thanksgiving table or wow your hostess. The Blushing Apple Pie combines beets with apples for a unique take or try the Brown Butter Pumpkin pie which has a subtle butterscotch note. For a non traditional approach, whip up a Buttered Rum Cream Pie or a Grapefruit Custard Pie.

When all is said and done and the dishes are washed the only question left is what to do with all that leftover turkey! This is where Culinary Birds by Chef John Ash comes in handy. This James Beard award winner covers all poultry but contains a sizable section on turkey with many unique recipes such as Turkey Tortilla Soup, Turkey Bolognese or Dan Dan Noodles (with turkey of course! ) When you have eaten your fill of leftover sandwiches, give Culinary Birds a try to shake things up a bit.

There you have it, Thanksgiving start to finish. Stop by the library for these and many more whether you need a wine pairing, a pie crust or turkey brine, we’ve got it all. For updates, follow us on Instagram @IntlCulLibrary