Demo Event for the Release of Master Chefs of France: The Cookbook

Master Chefs of France: The Cookbook is the new standard for all modern French cookery. It is the first cookbook produced by the MCF. This authoritative book features recipes by 77 of the 80 member chefs of the prestigious Maîtres Cuisiniers de France North American chapter (MCF-USA/Canada).  Some of these chefs you will have seen on TV; some have won multiple awards at prestigious Culinary Recognition Events, and some will not be known to you yet.  Regardless, it will be a treasured volume in every cooking library.

Each recipe is beautifully photographed by the world-famous Battman, and presented in striking color with an 8.75” x 12” hardcover landscape format. Curated by MCF-USA/Canada President Jean-Louis Dumonet, and under the passionate direction of Karen Dumonet, this exciting collection of savory dishes, 154 in all, is equally tempting to both palate and eye.  Foreword and Preface messages are provided by two giants of the French culinary tradition, Paul Bocuse, and Jacques Pepin.

The chefs live and work in 21 States in the US, in Canada, Grand Cayman, and St. Lucia. You will have seen some of them on TV; some have won multiple awards at prestigious Culinary Recognition Events, and some will not be known to you yet. With only 500 Chefs worldwide in the global organization, you will enjoy their vibrant and creative vibe.  Aside from our Dean of Special Programs, Jacques Pepin, the cookbook also features recipes from two of ICC’s own Master Chefs, Chef Marc Bauer and Chef Hervé Malivert.

Maîtres Cuisiniers de France is the most envied title that chefs aspire to have, but not everyone can become a Maître Cuisinier. The worldwide Association of Maîtres Cuisiniers de France was founded in 1951 and is the first savory culinary organization worldwide.  Its motto is to preserve and spread the French culinary arts, encourage training in cuisine, and assist professional development.”

 “The know-how and wisdom of the MCF members is a conduit to the past and a passport to the future to ensure the posterity of the French unique culinary and cultural heritage. Close to 80 MCF from all over North America have contributed their recipes to this unique and beautiful cookbook, many of them personal friends. I am looking forward to cooking from this book with friends and family while sharing a glass of wine and many of the memories and stories attached to these recipes.”   – Jacques Pépin, ICC Dean of Special Programs

The book is available for purchase now on Amazon and  autographed copies [by the photographer] are available at www.thechefsconnection.com

BOOK LAUNCH EVENT

THURSDAY, OCTOBER 5 | 3:30-5PM

To celebrate the release of Master Chefs of France: The Cookbook, the International Culinary Center will be holding an exclusive demonstration and book signing with Chef Marc Bauer and Chef Hervé Malivert on Thursday, October 5 from 3:30 pm to 5 pm at the school’s New York City location. Within the 90-minute event, the two French Master Chefs will be demonstrating their personal recipes from the cookbook and will be enlightening the audience on their inspirations behind the dishes through a spirited Q&A session. Cookbooks will be available for purchase during the event and Chefs Marc and Hervé will be signing copies on-site. We hope to see you there!

Pastry Plus 2017: A Student’s Perspective

Article by Katie Malkin
Professional Pastry Arts Student

As someone who’s new to the professional pastry world, I was excited to volunteer for the International Culinary Center’s first conference for pastry professionals and listen in on some of the talks, panels, and conversations to hear what has the pastry industry abuzz.

As it turns out, there are a number of current trends that happen to be popular in the minds of top pastry chefs. While these are just the tip of the iceberg, please reference my takeaways on three of these trends below.

  • Sustainability and Wellness – Bill Yosses, Pastry Chef to the Obama’s while they were in the White House, discussed the need for pastry chefs to show leadership in considering the health impacts of their products, both to consumers and to the environment. Dessert has a place in our diets, but Bill asked chefs to encourage their customers to indulge responsibly.
  • Insta-worthiness – Magritte Preston, freelance food writer, talked about the struggle of pastry chefs to compete in the world of Instagram, on which followers tend to flock toward eye-popping, yet taste-devoid desserts. She explained that chefs could incorporate decadence, novelty, and nostalgia into their social media posts to get views while maintaining their professionalism.
  • High-Tech – Beyond the mobile technology that’s changed the way chefs promote their food, there have been a number of other technological advances that are changing the way chefs make their food. In one example, Oliver LeRoy from Sasa DeMarle discussed advances in manufacturing, such as 3D printing, that allows them to create custom molds for chefs. These kinds of innovations are helping to democratize tools for creativity throughout the industry.

Determining how to combine sustainable products and practices, Instagram-friendly desserts and experiences, and cutting-edge technologies is a difficult, yet exciting, challenge facing pastry chefs today. Pastry Plus offered industry leaders a platform for sharing ideas on how to tackle this challenge with their peers. Hopefully, there will be future opportunities and platforms for collaboration in the pastry industry. Aspiring pastry chefs like myself will keep our fingers crossed.

View the full photo gallery below with highlights from the full day of panels with some of the biggest names in the pastry industry including Emily Luchetti, Ron Ben-Israel, Jacques Torres, Miro Uskokovic, Jiho Kim, Kelly Fields, and more.

All photography courtesy of Krystal Spencer.

Highlights from The First-Ever Pastryland 2017 Charity Bake Sale

This fall, the International Culinary Center hosted the first-ever Pastryland Bake Sale, benefiting City Harvest. An afternoon for the ultimate sweet tooth, Pastryland celebrated the innovative talents and imaginations of pastry chefs, showcasing never-before-tasted desserts from the chefs of Per Se, The Modern, Del Posto, Patisserie Chanson, & many more. The event featured an 8-foot tall piped wall of royal icing (which used a total of 120 pounds of sugar), and an Ice Luge of white & dark chocolate shots presented Callebaut® and Five Acre Farms.

ICC would like to thank all the chef and restaurant participants for their delicious, one-of-a-kind contributions during the charity bake sale. As a result, ICC will be donating $5000 to support City Harvest in their hunger relief efforts.

The success of Pastryland would not have been possible without the generous support of our sponsors (listed below) and numerous attendees. In addition to the prestigious pastry chefs mentioned below, Pastryland also gathered social media curators such as Nina Joy of @TheFoodJoy and Sarah Merrill of @BigKidProblems as well as Dessert Professional, Dessert Buzz, The Wandering Eater blog, Union Square Hospitality Group and many others.


Caramelized White Chocolate Cake      | |    Daniel Alvarez – Pastry Chef, Union Square Café and Daily Provisions

PB + J     | |    Tyler Atwell* – Executive Pastry Chef, Lafayette

Marshmallo-licious Delight    | |    Anna Bolz* – Pastry Chef, Per Se

Assorted Linzer Cookies     | |    Stephen Collucci – Pastry Chef, Cookshop

Rhubarb Cake     | |    Douglas Hernandez – Pastry Chef, Oceana

Black + White Choux     | |    Daniel Keehner – Executive Pastry Chef, Union Square Events

Nusszopf     | |    Jiho Kim – Executive Pastry Chef, The Modern

Fudge + Dulce De Leche Bar    | |    Johana Langi – Executive Pastry Chef, The Lambs Club

Thai Tea + Coconut Tapioca    | |     Jason Licker* – Pastry Specialist & Author, Lickerland

Lemon Poppyseed Kouign Amann    | |    Rory Macdonald – Executive Chef, Patisserie Chanson

Schiacciata Con l’Uva    | |    Justine MacNeil* – Executive Pastry Chef, Del Posto

Blueberry Bundt Cake    | |    Michael Mignano – Executive Pastry Chef, Perrine at The Pierre Hotel

Chocolate Fig Cake    | |    Cynthia Peithman & Jansen Chan – Pastry Chef-Instructor & Director of Pastry Operations, International Culinary Center

Assorted Macarons    | |    Thomas Raquel – Executive Pastry Chef, Le Bernardin

Chocolate Chip Toffee Coffee Cookies    | |    James Rosselle – Corporate Executive Pastry Chef, iPic Theaters

Tarte au Chocolate au Sel et Sarrasin    | |    Daniel Skurnick – Executive Pastry Chef, Le Coucou & Buddakan

Sticky Toffee Drunken Donuts    | |    Tracy Wilk – Executive Pastry Chef, SaltBrick Tavern


Charity Partner: City Harvest

Platinum Sponsor: Callebaut®

Gold Sponsor: Sasa Demarle®

Silver Sponsor: KMT Waterjet

Bronze Sponsor: Innovative Sugarworks

Contributing Sponsors: City of SaintsFive Acre FarmsPalais Des ThésNY CakeMurray’s Baz Bagel & RestaurantMeyer’s BageriIce & ViceRenshawMichel et AugustinOatly

Pastry Plus Party Sponsor: Jacques Torres Chocolate

Leadership Partner: James Beard Foundation


All photos provided by Rachel Golden | Golden Raye Photography

Win a Trip To Spain From The International Rioja Wine & Tapas Competition

Think you can create a tapa that pairs perfectly with a Rioja? Do just that and you could win a culinary trip to Spain!

The 2nd International ‘Rioja Wine & Tapas’ competition is underway and there’s still one more month to submit your proposal!

For the second year running the D.O.Ca. Rioja, in collaboration with the Basque Culinary Center, launches this international competition to pair tapas with Rioja wines. Aimed at gastronomy school students, this competition seeks to award recipes that reflect the multicultural reality of gastronomy. Proposals must include a written recipe, image of the recipe prepared, the Rioja wine is chosen to pair with the tapa and a brief explanation of why that wine was chosen.

The winner will receive a gastronomic holiday in Spain, where they’ll visit one of the main wine producing regions–D.O.Ca. Rioja–and visit San Sebastian to eat at a renowned restaurant and enjoy a tapas tour accompanied by an expert.

To enter, submit your proposal by October 28, 2017, online at http://us.riojawine.com/tapascompetition/en/participa/.

For rules, regulations and more information visit http://us.riojawine.com/tapascompetition/en/ or email communication@riojawine.com.

Hard Work Tastes Like Miso, A Friday Evening at Hachi ju Hachi

By Savannah Sharrett,
Communications Liaison

For a refreshing, crash-course in what it means to have passion, spend a little time with Chef Suzuki and his team.

Recently, I spent a Friday evening at Hachi ju Hachi, located in downtown Saratoga, CA. Entering the restaurant, the first thing I noticed was a sense of calm to the dimly lit space. Looking in from the front door, the sun light reveals long walls lined with small tables. Straight ahead is a sushi bar with a clear view of the open kitchen.

This understated gem has been open for 8 years and has many loyal, regular customers. Looking up at the ceiling and around the walls, there is clear evidence of appreciation. Written in Sharpie, you’ll find hundreds of comments of praise. Beaming with pride, Owner & Chef, Jin Suzuki says of the walls, “You’ll notice that there is not one celebrity and only ordinary people”. The restaurant is open for regular business hours but every two weeks, the doors close to the general public to host a special sushi night where they invite a small group of people for a carefully curated tasting menu.

From time to time, students from the ICC have had the opportunity to work under the apprenticeship of Chef Suzuki. Currently, you can find two of our alumni working alongside each other in his kitchen. Working under Chef Suzuki’s guidance and training in the art of Japanese Cuisine, EJ, a 2013 culinary graduate and Kristen, a 2016 culinary graduate are cultivating qualities like patience and respect for their craft. There is something to be said about the precision and attention to detail this team of 3 is able to maintain consistency.

In an effort to understand the success of HJH, I asked EJ to share his thoughts on the restaurant’s philosophy on food. He said, “Chef Suzuki is not just a mentor. It is not just food; its philosophy and life. To survive in this kitchen you must have the mindset that this isn’t just food or recipes, it’s a lifestyle. You have to respect that”. He added, “Techniques are done correctly. Make your mistakes but don’t do it again.” In reference to the passion that has grown within him over time, EJ asks himself, “Do you want to cut cucumbers every day? Yes! Do you want to crack eggs every day? Yes! I want to.”

Although they were given a foundation in French Techniques from their schooling at the ICC, I appreciated that both EJ and Kirsten had an ease using Japanese terms. When I asked them if that was a requirement for working at HJH, EJ said, “Learning the proper words shows respect”.  Working with Chef Suzuki has certainly added to their culinary repertoire and given them versatility.

When I had first arrived that evening, EJ had been working on Saba mackerel, preparing them to be marinated at room temperature and then overnight in the fridge. I asked him if there were certain techniques he had especially enjoyed learning at HJH and he mentioned something called San Mai Oroshi– a 3 part technique used to open a fish that results in 2 full fillets with the spine still intact. He was also very proud to show me and let me taste his frozen sweet potato puree that was served like an ice cream.

I then asked Kirsten to share her thoughts on the restaurant’s philosophy. She was quick to say that, “It all starts and ends with respect”. Throughout the evening, I was impressed to hear her call Chef Suzuki, Itacho, which means in Japanese, “head of the cutting board”. Having now worked at HJH for a year, she has gained many new skills from her mentor. She was kind enough to give me a demonstration on the difference between Japanese and French knife techniques. She also mentioned that she was currently learning something called, Katsuramuki. This term refers to the ability to slice a vegetable such as a cucumber or a daikon into one long, thin sheet. For this technique, she was taught to use a Usuba, a “single-bevel knife used for cutting veggies”. Initially feeling like this task was daunting, Kerstin describes the learning process as a practical lesson in discipline and now feels driven to do it every day. She notes that her constant goal is, “doing better than the last time. I did this today and I’ll do it tomorrow”. Comparing her limited year of experience to her mentor, Chef Suzuki, she happily exclaimed, “I’ll meet you there in 30 years”!  Being the newest to the kitchen, Kirsten benefits from the experience of not only Chef Suzuki but also her fellow apprentice, EJ. In regards to her training under both of them, she noted, “They never go easy on me but I know it’s because they care and that in turn makes me care as much as them”.

Even with his 30 years of experience, Chef Suzuki doesn’t hesitate to point out that he is still learning and feels that it is his responsibility to pass on the knowledge he does have. He comments, “Most people are looking for an instant result but cooking isn’t about that.  It takes patience and discipline. The journey is not 6 months, it takes years”. Chef made sure to note that he will never claim to a master chef. Explaining that personal joy is essential, he expresses, “ I just like what I do and that’s enough”.  I asked him how he received his own training and he explained that throughout his early career in Japan, he had 3 different mentors. With that attitude in mind, the ICC is looking forward to hosting Chef Suzuki on our campus this August for a class on the history and usage of miso. (Click here to learn more.

Later that evening, Chef Suzuki asked me to stay for dinner and was very generous. I left the restaurant that evening feeling peaceful and energized. If you ever find yourself in the Bay Area, Hachi ju Hachi should definitely be on your itinerary.

 

 

 

Photo Gallery: Highlights from The NY Cake Show 2017 at Pier 36

The International Culinary Center hosted a demonstration stage at The NY Cake Show 2017 throughout June 10th and 11th at Pier 36. The stage featured 45-minute lessons with ICC Pastry Chef-Instructors including the school’s Director of Pastry Operations, Chef Jansen Chan, Senior Coordinator (Pastry), Chef Jurgen David, and Chef Michael Zebrowski, Chef-Instructor and ICC Alumni. Additional ICC alumni on the roster included Justine MacNeil, Executive Pastry Chef of Del Posto, Chef Pietro Aletto, Executive Pastry Chef at Boutrous, and various other established pastry professionals.

As a returning Education Partner of the New York Cake Show, we were excited to be part of one of the country’s premier cake competition. We were especially proud to feature our outstanding alumni chefs and pastry chef-instructors throughout the weekend at our very own demonstration theater. Amazing pastries, such as rhubarb pie, baklava sticky buns, and gluten-free chocolate cakes, were on the menu – a very exciting weekend for all our attendees! I was especially proud of our The Cookie Games V winners showcasing how to make their Browned Butter Masala Chai cookies.” – Chef Jansen Chan, Director of Pastry Operations at ICC.

 

Photo Gallery: The Cookie Games 2017

Thank you to all student participants in the 5-year anniversary of The Cookie Games, as well as our fabulous judges. The roster of judges included Angie Mar (Chef/Owner at Beatrice Inn), Dorie Greenspan (Cookbook Author), Florian Bellanger (Executive Pastry Chef at MadMac), Robb Riedel (Managing Editor of Food Network Magazine) and Erik Murnighan (President of the International Culinary Center).

Congratulations to this year’s 1st place winners, Madeline Dudek and Clara Lim, students in ICC’s Professional Culinary Arts program for their India-inspired Browned Butter Masala Chai cookie. To check out their recipe to try at home, click here.  In addition to prizes furnished from our sponsors, including KitchenAid, the ladies were awarded with the opportunity to demonstrate their award-winning cookies at the New York Cake Show at Pier 36 on Sunday, June 11.

The Exploration of Tea with Rishi Tea

Written by: Vanessa Da Silva
ICC Wine Studies Coordinator
Certified Sommelier

Justin, a self-described crazy person (when it comes to tea) has spent the last 2 decades not only sourcing some of the finest teas in the world but also, painstakingly retracing the historic roots & practices which have shaped the tea trade over the last 1,200 years! Justin, along with Keiko Nicolini & an entourage (truly) of trained tea enthusiasts, walked us through the cultivars & techniques of these rare & artisanal teas at a recent demo in ICC’s New York campus.

There are so many things we overlook when considering tea. Here are 5 teas that will make you thirsty:

Woojun Green Tea, South Korea – This tea is crafted in South Korea by Mr. Lee Chang Yung & his family. This is the first young leaves that are picked for the season, and Mr. Yung hand fires the tea leaves in a wok in small batches to bring out all of their beautiful fresh aromas. This tea, picked just in mid-April, was bursting with fresh spring flavors of grass & just bloomed fresh white flowers.

White Peony King Organic White Tea, Fujian province, China – Rishi was Organic, long before the USDA Organic seal came into play in 2002. They have built their career on sourcing from environmentally responsible tea farms across Asia. This White Peony King was described as the “Grand Cru of tea” and it well delivered. The tea was smooth & delicate with aromas of magnolia, hints of honey, and a savory saline quality full of umami.  It’s a generally overlooked fact that white tea is the ‘freshest’ of teas. With very minimal processing, most white teas are just allowed to dry out to fully express their pure & delicate flavors.

Four Seasons Spring Oolong Tea– As the name suggests, this tea produces leaves at least 4 times yearly always offering a fresh ‘spring’ taste.  Within this category, we tasted two teas of the same cultivar (variety), made in the same way, but one grown in Taiwan & the other in Thailand. Now, we wine-enthusiasts are very familiar with tasting notes in wine & the idea of ‘terroir’; however, I had no idea that Tea could show similar variations based on where they are grown. These two blew me away. The Taiwan-grown tea (where this variety originated) was incredibly fresh reminding me of hydrangeas, fresh lychee fruit, and white raspberries.  In contrast, its Thai counterpart, showed a distinct nuttiness of toasted almond skin, along with bright sweet basil & sage. The comparison was a big eye opener & finding two Oolongs to compare could be a lot of fun!

Vintage Ancient Pu-erh Palace Organic Pu-erh Tea, Yunnan province, China – This tea was another eye-opener as the concept of vintage tea is completely new to me. Pu-erh teas are among the few that benefit from long-term aging, a minimum of 2-years is required before they are suitable for drinking as the teas are fermented and need to mellow out. These teas were from the Menghai Broad Leaf cultivar and we tasted the 2012 and 2009 vintage. The 2012 (just 5 years old) was strong and tannic with notes of bittersweet chocolate; whereas, the 2009 (now over 8 years old) was smooth and luxurious with notes of dark roasted coffee, cocoa, and black cherry.

Flowery Jin Xuan, Organic Oolong Tea, Doi Mae Salong, Thailand – There were so many dynamic Tea throughout the day, it was difficult to narrow down to just 5, but this was a personal favorite. This ball-rolled Oolong is oxidized to give a greenish-golden hue. It has a beautifully silky mouth-feel that made it seem almost milky (which is why this cultivar is often referred to as ‘Milk Oolong’. The tea was pleasant & smooth and smelled exactly of fresh blooming lilacs, which brought me right back to my childhood in rural Maine.

In addition to all of this, we learned that it takes around 35,000 tea leaves (each plucked by hand) to make just 1 kilo of dried tea!

The passion & expertise from the team at Rishi was infectious around the room, I heard question after question from our graduates being met with enthusiasm. It is clear that this is merely scratching the surface in what is becoming an area of interest in more & more restaurants.

 

ICC Announces Baking Demonstrations at New York Cake Show June 10-11

Patiently waiting for this year’s New York Cake Show?

The 2-day event spanning from June 10 & 11 at Pier 36 gets better with a stage of demonstrations sponsored by The International Culinary Center. The award-winning culinary school is proud to announce a series of exciting baking demonstrations from pastry chefs, covering a range of topics from healthy baking substitutions and gluten-free baking to cookie crafting and French macarons.

The demonstration stage will feature ICC Pastry Chef-Instructors including the school’s Director of Pastry Operations, Chef Jansen Chan, as well as Senior Coordinator (Pastry), Chef Jurgen David, and Chef Michael Zebrowski, Chef-Instructor and ICC Alumni. Additional ICC alumni on the roster will be Justine MacNeil, Executive Pastry Chef of Del Posto, Chef Pietro Aletto, Executive Pastry Chef at Boutrous, plus many other established pastry professionals.

Each demonstration will be 45 minutes long, and attendees will receive tastings and recipes during each sitting. Tickets to attend the demonstrations are $25. Don’t miss the opportunity to watch and learn from these leading pastry chefs. Check out the full schedule of ICC demonstrations below and register via the links below.

DEMONSTRATION TICKETS
GENERAL ADMISSION
NY CAKE SHOW WEBSITE
Full Schedule:
SATURDAY

10:00am
Healthy Baking Substitutions 
Chef Michelle Olson, Owner of Michelle Doll Cakes & Resident Chef of Sur La Table

1:00pm
Torta Barozzi: Italian Flourless Chocolate Cake 
Chef Justine MacNeil, Executive Pastry Chef of Del Posto

2:00pm
Roulades: Sponge Cake Construction 
Chef Jurgen David, ICC Senior Coordinator & Pastry Chef Instructor

3:00pm
Brioche Baklava Bun
Chef Pietro Aletto, Executive Pastry Chef of Boutros

4:00pm
Perfect Cake Mixing Methods 
Chef Jurgen David, ICC Senior Coordinator & Pastry Chef Instructor

SUNDAY

10:00 AM
Gluten-Free Baking
Chef Antonella Zangheri, Chef/Owner of Krumville Bake Shop

11:00 AM
Classic Home Style Layer Cakes 
Chef Katie Rosenhouse, Owner of Buttermilk Bake Shop

1:00 PM
Crafting Cookies with ICC 
Chef Jansen Chan, ICC Director Of Pastry Operations + ICC 2017 Cookie Games Winners: Madeline Dudek & Clara Lim

2:00 PM
Pie 101
Chef Michael Zebrowski, ICC Pastry Chef Instructor

4:00 PM
French Macarons & Fillings 
Chef Michael Zebrowski, ICC Pastry Chef Instructor

Why Become an Olive Oil Sommelier?

Written by Curtis Cord
Founder of Olive Oil Times and Executive Director of ICC’s Olive Oil Sommelier Certification program


There’s never been so much interest in high-quality extra virgin olive oil. Why?

Two reasons: First, there are the health benefits revealed in a never-ending stream of research that credits components in EVOO with helping us live longer, healthier lives.

And, there’s the taste. Extra virgin olive oil is an unprocessed fruit juice that reflects its terroir much like wine, and chefs around the world are only beginning to discover how to use different olive varieties to elevate their dishes to heights they never imagined.

But something else that has come to the forefront is the importance of choosing a high-quality olive oil to get the full advantage of these benefits. There’s a huge difference between a really great olive oil and one pretending to be. Mislabeled and substandard oils are a major concern for people who are responsible for making choices in this category.

Luckily for us, there are more excellent olive oils, from more regions, than ever before. At this year’s New York International Olive Oil Competition (an annual event that was launched at the ICC five years ago) there were 910 entries from 27 countries — and more winners than in past editions.

That’s great news for those of us who care a lot about what we eat and seek the best quality, especially in products as important as extra virgin olive oil.

But, there’s a problem. The only way to really know if an olive oil is good or not is to learn how to taste it. Most people can’t tell a high-quality olive oil that deserves the investment from an old, rancid one that shouldn’t be on the store shelves, to begin with.

In fact, we’ve been eating poor-quality olive oil for so long that a recent study found most people actually chose a rancid oil that has virtually none of the touted health benefits, over a fresh, healthful one simply because they didn’t know what they should be looking for and selected the one that seemed more familiar to them.


So what does good extra virgin olive oil taste like?

First of all, it can’t reveal what we call “defects” in olive oil sensory assessment. Some of the most common are rancidity (basically spoiled fruit, like a banana that has turned black), fustiness (when the olives have undergone advanced fermentation often by sitting around before they were milled) and muddy (that results from unclean milling equipment).

There are also what are called the “positive characteristics of olive oil”  — fruitiness, bitterness, and pungency — that are indicators of fresh, healthy fruit and careful processing. Trained tasters look for oils that exhibit a nice balance of the three.

To recognize defects and positive attributes take time and practice, but with so much at stake, more chefs, producers, food buyers, foodies and others are finding it well worth the effort to know how to assess the quality of this vital food for themselves, their families and the companies they represent.

The Olive Oil Program at the International Culinary Center brings the world’s foremost olive oil experts and educators to the New York and California campuses in a comprehensive series of courses spanning production, quality management, and advanced sensory assessment.

There has never been a greater need to foster a deeper understanding of this important food among today’s culinary leaders, and there is no better place than the International Culinary Center to lead the way to greater knowledge.

Register today to join our upcoming Olive Oil Certification courses at our California Campus beginning in October 2017 (click here). Course One runs from October 2-4 and Course Two runs fr October 5-7