Cherry Bombe 100 influential women

The Cherry Bombe 100: A Celebration of Influential Women

Over the past five years, Cherry Bombe has celebrated women in the culinary world, sharing their stories and building a community of people making the world a better place through food. This year, they introduced The Cherry Bombe 100, a list of the 100 women who inspire the food world through their creativity, energy, humanity and hard work. From chefs and restaurant owners to food activists, writers, entrepreneurs and more, these women are influential to both the culinary industry and the ICC Community!

We’re proud to recognize ICC Culinary Entrepreneurship instructor, Liz Alpern, and nine ICC alumni who made it on The Cherry Bombe 100 list for their incredible work and accomplishments as innovators and thought leaders in the culinary industry. Check out these 10 amazing women below, and see the full Cherry Bombe 100 list here.

 

Liz Alpern
Culinary Entrepreneurship Instructor 

To have chutzpah is to be audacious—and culinary consultant and teacher Liz Alpern is nothing if not audacious. She co-founded The Gefilteria as a way to rethink gefilte fish, a traditional food that few chefs were clamoring to reclaim, and has since grown the company from a single product to one with workshops, pop-up dinners, and a cookbook: The Gefilte Manifesto: New Recipes for Old World Jewish Food. Liz, however, is as much new school as she is old school. She’s also co-founder of Queer Soup Night, a roving fundraising party that celebrates a previously overlooked category of chefs and food enthusiasts.

Ashley Christensen
Ashley Christensen
Sous Vide Intensive ’12

Since making Raleigh, North Carolina, her home, Ashley Christensen has sought to foster community through food, philanthropy and the stimulation of the city’s downtown neighborhood. After working in some of the Triangle’s top kitchens, Ashley opened Poole’s Diner in 2007, one of downtown Raleigh’s first restaurants. In 2011, she opened three new ventures—Beasley’s Chicken + Honey, Chuck’s, and Fox Liquor Bar. In the spring of 2015, her restaurant group introduced Death & Taxes, a restaurant celebrating wood-fire cooking with Southern ingredients, and Bridge Club, a private events loft and cooking classroom. Ashley is an active member of the Southern Foodways Alliance and founded the biannual event Stir the Pot, in which she hosts visiting chefs in Raleigh to raise funds for the SFA’s documentary initiatives.

Angela Garbacz
Angela Garbacz
 Professional Pastry Arts ’08

Angela Garbacz is the owner of Goldenrod Pastries, a boutique pastry shop in Lincoln, Nebraska. In 2008, she moved to New York City to attend the French Culinary Institute (now International Culinary Center), where she earned a degree in Classic French Pastry Arts. During her time there, she worked with top toques in the industry, including Dave Arnold, Jean Georges Vongerichten, Nils Nóren, and Harold McGee. Years later, after learning she had an intolerance to dairy, she decided to chronicle her baking journey, and started the Goldenrod Pastries blog. It was there she reimagined baking for a variety of restricted and alternative diets (dairy-free, gluten-free, vegan). Her recipes, photos and anecdotes quickly gained a large and dedicated following. For a year, Angela was fulfilling catering orders out of her home kitchen while also working in international marketing. Realizing it was time to pursue pastry full-time, she quit her job in 2015 and opened the doors to Goldenrod Pastries where her all-American desserts and pastries feature unique flavor combinations and a strikingly vivid color palette.

Lani Halliday
Lani Halliday
Culinary Entrepreneurship ’18

Lani Halliday is the creative baker behind Brooklyn’s Brutus Bakeshop. She has made a name for herself with her delicious, colorful, gluten-free creations–including her fabulous snake cakes. She has contributed her time and talent to organizations such as Queer Soup Night, the roving fundraising event. She is currently at work on a new concept, Dominga Brooklyn, set to debut next year, and she is currently helping the small businesses impacted by the closing of the Pilotworks incubator program find new workspace and resources.

Angie Mar
Angie Mar
Professional Culinary Arts ’11 

Think all steakhouses are ultra-masculine affairs? Not according to Chef Angie Mar. The Seattle native has run the kitchen at The Beatrice Inn since 2013, then fully reinvented the hallowed spot as owner and executive chef in 2016. The historic, subterranean West Village restaurant, best known in the early aughts as the paparazzi-swarmed after-hours boite of choice for the Olsens, Lindsay Lohan, and Chloe Sevigny, has become an impressive shrine to meat matters, where Angie showcases whole animal butchery, live fire cooking, and dry aging prowess. Before The Beatrice Inn, Angie cooked at multiple NYC carnivore’s havens, like Marlow & Sons, Diner, and Reynard, plus The Spotted Pig. Angie proves superb steak certainly isn’t—and shouldn’t be—a bro-y boys’ club.

Camilla Marcus
Camilla Marcus
Professional Culinary Arts ’08

Camilla Marcus has one of the most modern minds in the restaurant world today. She helped bring to life some of New York’s most beloved neighborhood restaurants, including dell’anima, Riverpark, and the reopened Union Square Café, but it’s with the launch of west-bourne that her passions fully come together. An accidentally vegetarian and decidedly wholesome concept, west-bourne brings people together to eat well and do good, which means a business model that incorporates youth job training, an emphasis on organic and local produce, and a zero-waste approach to benefit the planet and its people. Camilla is also co-founder of TechTable, a hospitality technology thought leadership platform, and a partner in Pound for Pound Consulting, a boutique strategic and creative agency for hospitality-related initiatives.

Klancy Miller
Klancy Miller
The Craft of Food Writing ’04

Klancy Miller is the author of Cooking Solo: The Fun of Cooking For Yourself. She is a writer and pastry chef and earned her diplôme de pâtisserie from Le Cordon Bleu Paris, and apprenticed at the Michelin-starred restaurant Taillevent. She has appeared in The New York Times Food section and on Food Network’s Recipe for Success and Cooking Channel’s Unique Sweets. She has contributed to Cherry Bombe, Bon Appétit, Food 52 and The Washington Post. Klancy is a co-founder of the cookbook club at The Wing and an advisory board member for Equity at The Table (EATT).

Grace Ramirez
Grace Ramirez
Professional Culinary Arts ’11

Grace Ramirez is the tenacious chef, author, and TV personality born in Venezuela and raised in Miami. Her gorgeous cookbook, La Latina: A Cook’s Journey Through Latin America, is a celebration of and love letter to her culture. When her proposal for a book about Latin food was rejected, Grace worked around the system and found a way to get La Latina published. She also hustled to get her TV career off the ground and today hosts Destino Con Sabor on the Food Network. Grace actively supports numerous relief efforts throughout the world for Mexico, Puerto Rico and Venezuela, working with World Central Kitchen, El Plato Caliente, Nuestros Pequeños Hermanos, and many others. Her drive, passion and humanitarian efforts were recognized with a Distinguished Latina Star award from the Puerto Rican Bar Association.

Avery Ruzicka
Avery Ruzicka
Art of International Bread Baking ’11

Avery Ruzicka believes in milling your own flour, a long fermentation process, and the power of freshly baked bread. She is the baker and co-owner of Manresa Bread, the spinoff of the popular Manresa restaurant in Los Gatos, California. She started working at the restaurant as a runner, but longed to be in the kitchen. Once there, she felt a restaurant of Manresa’s caliber should be making its own bread, and was given the go-ahead to start baking. Today, there are two Manresa Bread brick-and-mortar locations and stands at the Palo Alto and Campbell farmers’ markets. Avery fans will be thrilled to know an all-day bakery and cafe will open soon in Campbell, giving them another way to get the Manresa Bread delights, which include the signature Levain, hand-rolled Croissants, Whole Grain Salted Caramel Sourdough Donuts, Triple Chocolate Orange Panettone, Chocolate Babka, and more.

Christina Tosi
Christina Tosi
Professional Pastry Arts ’04

Superstar pastry chef and Milk Bar founder Christina Tosi single-handedly changed the way we look at dessert. She brought modernity and creativity to the category with her unique baked goods, including Compost Cookies and Crack Pie. She elevated soft serve from simple summer treat to something chef-worthy. And we have her to thank for the naked cake trend: she wanted to leave the outside of cakes unfrosted so we could see what was inside. Her third book, All About Cake, is out this month, and she was the subject of a recent Chef’s Table documentary so sincere it moved many of her fans to tears.

Restaurant Growth logo

8 Tips To Improve Your Social Media Presence

Written by: Marty Schecht, ’16 Graduate of the Professional Culinary Arts Program, CEO of Restaurant Growth Marketing

A key factor in determining a restaurants success in today’s world is social media marketing. If you’re a restaurant, bakery, or any other food business, these digital platforms have evolved into an extension of your daily operations that can help you to succeed.  Social media is a powerful tool that changes every day.

Here are eight tips to improve your social media strategy to reach more customers, grow your following, and improve your brand:

  1. Post 4 – 6 Times a Week
    • Each post you make is only seen by about 5% of your followers, so don’t worry about posting too much content.
  2. Engage with your Followers/Customers
    • Interacting with customers makes them feel heard, wanted, and important. Respond to reviews, comments, and messages, both good and bad.
  3. Post More Videos
    • Videos have a much higher attention rate than pictures.
  4. Re-Post Pictures that your Customers Post about your Business
    • Pick and choose the best pictures your customers have posted on Instagram by searching your businesses geotag (location) and reposting them on your page. Make sure to give the customer credit and thank them for coming in.
  5. Use Local Hashtags (if you’re a local business)
    • Using local hashtags will generate local awareness.
  6. Always Post your Specials/New Menu Items
    • Any new deals, specials, menu items, or products should be posted. Let customers know about specials and that it’s for a limited time.
  7. Follow your Competitors
    • Interacting with your competitors is good for business. Friendly competition is interesting and gets people involved and talking about your business.
  8. See your Post from the Eyes of your Customers
    • Before each post, ask yourself, do my followers care about this, is it interesting or unique. How rare is it? Will my followers want to share it?

Bonus Tips:

  • Partner with Food Bloggers
    • Locate food bloggers and influencers and interact with them. Build relationships. Invite them in for a free meal.
  • Ask Your Followers to Share
    • The biggest mistakes businesses make is not asking their followers to share their content. Sometimes a little instruction is all a follower needs.

We sat down with Marty to learn about his background, business, and the world of restaurants. Below, find our interview with him and learn more about his company!

 

How did I get involved in the culinary industry?

Taking the Professional Culinary Arts Program at ICC represented a crucial measure of my life’s path to becoming an entrepreneur.  Fueling my motivation, it drove me to a level of confidence that is required when starting your own business.

I learned numerous tangible skills but the greatest attributes I took away from my time at ICC were time management and organization.  Skills I use every day, whether I’m in a kitchen, taking notes during a client meeting, or just planning my day-to-day schedule. I am grateful for my time at ICC.

 

Why is Social Media and Digital Marketing so important to me?

Before heading off to culinary school, I studied entrepreneurial marketing at the University of Iowa.  Opening a restaurant was always my goal, even when I was studying business in college.  The restaurant industry fascinated me, and I wanted to be a part of it.  Although, I never ended up opening my own restaurant, I discovered a unique opportunity to help restaurants and other food businesses thrive using strategic social media marketing and advertising.

Therefore, after attending ICC, I invested a significant amount of time and money to understand what was happening in the constantly evolving world of online marketing. I came to understand the power behind social media and what it can do for a business—if used strategically.  I found a way to combine my passion of restaurants and the food industry, with my education and knowledge of social media.

 

How have I used my education to help others?

I started a company called Restaurant Growth Marketing as a way to help businesses reach their true potential.  As founder and CEO, my focus is to help restaurants, and other food industry related businesses, efficiently utilize the world of online marketing to grow their business in ways they never thought were possible.

My motivation derived from a few mentors I found who taught me about mind-set and how to best educate myself.  They taught me about the world of online marketing and how 95% of businesses needed help.  So, I decided to invest in my own education and apply that knowledge to assist business owners in the food & restaurant industry.

 

How do I manage my business and what services do I offer?

My daily efforts are currently focused on the Miami metropolitan area, but I have clients on both the east and west coast and can help any restaurant/food business anywhere in the United States.  Each day I aim to get face-to-face with more business owners to express the power of the internet and social media, when it’s used the correct way, and show them how I increase sales 10-20% for my clients, often in the first year.

The first step in the process after we take on a client is to dive deep into the minds of the target market to figure out the consumers’ interests, behaviors, and buying habits so we can cost-effectively reach and communicate with them.  Our goal at RGM is not to just reach lots of people or manage your social media, but rather to bring new and repeat customers – to increase revenue.

 

Where do restaurant owners go wrong and how do I help them avoid common pitfalls?

Most restaurant owners are not used to developing such a strategic marketing action plan focused on results.  One of the biggest mistakes’ restaurant owners make is not having and implementing a strategic-executable marketing plan.

What we do at Restaurant Growth Marketing is help businesses create and implement their marketing plan, through result-driven, proven marketing strategies. We focus on results and getting our clients an ROI that makes sense and makes them excited to work with us.  My objective with Restaurant Growth Marketing is to provide restaurants with a customized service focused on growing their brand and increasing customer base.  We’re excited to have such a great opportunity to provide business owners with more stability, strategy, revenue and most importantly, time to work on their business – instead of in it.

 

For more information about Restaurant Growth Marketing:

Please visit our website: https://restaurantgrowth.marketing

Check us out on Facebook: @restaurantGM or https://www.facebook.com/restaurantGM/

Follow us on Instagram: @restaurantgrowthmarketing https://www.instagram.com/restaurantgrowthmarketing/

Holiday Scholarship Special

ICC’s Holiday Scholarship Specials Announced

'TIS THE SEASON FOR SAVINGS

This holiday season, don’t miss out on giving yourself the gift of a lifetime: a culinary or pastry education!

We’re excited to announce our Holiday Scholarship Specials to help you be on your way to a new culinary or pastry career before the New Year! Begin in ICC’s Professional Culinary Arts of Professional Pastry Arts programs this November or December and you could be eligible to receive one of our holiday scholarships with awards ranging from $15,000-$25,000.

Start your New Year’s resolution’s early—check out all the ways you can get into the kitchen with a scholarship from ICC this winter. Submit your application today!

Culinary

A student working

ICC Grand Culinary Scholarship

Financial need is a criterion for this scholarship. Applicants must complete a FAFSA.

AWARD AMOUNT: $25,000

ELIGIBLE CLASSES
Must be enrolled in one of the following PROFESSIONAL CULINARY ARTS programs:

  • 11/30/2018 Professional Culinary Arts (Mon-Fri, Day)
  • 12/11/2018 Professional Culinary Arts (Tues & Thurs, Eve + Sat, Day)

APPLICATION DEADLINE:

  • November 12, 2018

AWARD DATE:

  • November 19, 2018

Click here for eligibility requirements and application details.

A student working

ICC $15,000 Culinary Scholarship

Financial need is a criterion for this scholarship. Applicants must complete a FAFSA.

AWARD AMOUNT: $15,000 (multiple available)

ELIGIBLE CLASSES
Must be enrolled in one of the following PROFESSIONAL CULINARY ARTS program:

  • 11/30/2018 Professional Culinary Arts (Mon-Fri, Day)
  • 12/11/2018 Professional Culinary Arts (Tues & Thurs, Eve + Sat, Day)

APPLICATION DEADLINE:

  • November 12, 2018

AWARD DATE:

  • November 19, 2018

Click here for eligibility requirements and application details.

Pastry

A student working

ICC Grand Pastry Scholarship

Financial need is a criterion for this scholarship. Applicants must complete a FAFSA.

AWARD AMOUNT: $25,000

ELIGIBLE CLASSES
Must be enrolled in one of the following PROFESSIONAL PASTRY ARTS programs:

  • 11/28/2018 Professional Pastry Arts (Mon-Fri, Day)
  • 12/14/2018 Professional Pastry Arts (Mon, Wed & Fri, Eve)

APPLICATION DEADLINE:

  • November 12, 2018

AWARD DATE:

  • November 19, 2018

Click here for eligibility requirements and application details.

A student's dessert

ICC $15,000 PASTRY SCHOLARSHIP

Financial need is a criterion for this scholarship. Applicants must complete a FAFSA.

AWARD AMOUNT: $15,000

ELIGIBLE CLASSES
Must be enrolled in one of the following PROFESSIONAL PASTRY ARTS programs:

  • 11/28/2018 Professional Pastry Arts (Mon-Fri, Day)
  • 12/14/2018 Professional Pastry Arts (Mon, Wed & Fri, Eve)

APPLICATION DEADLINE:

  • November 12, 2018

AWARD DATE:

  • November 19, 2018

Click here for eligibility requirements and application details.

Deconstructed carrot cake

Elements of Developing an Original Dessert

When ICC re-launched the Professional Pastry Arts program in 2014, the curriculum was updated to better serve today’s pastry chef, educating our students to understand the science and technique behind a wide range of pastry skills to unlock their creativity—to think beyond a single recipe.

It was during this time that Restaurant Day was born, providing students with the opportunity to demonstrate everything they’ve learned in the 600-hour program to their friends and family in a fun and unique dessert tasting. Every Restaurant Day menu is different, designed, created and produced by the students with a unifying theme to best represent their experiences in the program. Throughout the years, over 250 original desserts have been created—including a Matcha Cake Trifle, Carrot Beignets, Coquito Cheesecake and Sweet Corn Fraisier—showcasing the creativity of the next generation of pastry professionals completing ICC’s program.

Restaurant Day 50

Semifredo from a studentEvery Restaurant Day features a different menu curated with never before seen desserts. For the 50th running of the Restaurant Day program this September, the ICC students, staff, deans, alumni and invited guests came together to celebrate the momentous occasion. This restaurant day was even more special than usual—it commemorated the dessert creations of all the previous classes, while showcasing our current pastry student’s hard work. From black sesame mille crêpes and port-poached fig tarts, to this lemon-raspberry semifreddo (pictured here) and everything in between, our guests left with their sweet tooth satisfied. Plus, students were excited to see special guest, ICC Dean of Pastry Arts, Chef Jacques Torres, at Restaurant Day to evaluate their desserts!

See our full gallery of photos from Restaurant Day 50, including all 8 original desserts created by our students, on our Facebook page here!

The Elements

The RD 50 classWhen you stop and think about all of the elements that go into creating a dessert, it can be daunting to figure out how the pros do it. Through our Professional Pastry Arts program, students work endlessly for 115 days to learn and develop all of the skills that they need to create their own original desserts. We sat down with our Director of Pastry Operations, Chef Jansen Chan, who is the mastermind behind Restaurant Day 50 and many other pastry projects at ICC to discuss the essential elements that are required to create a dessert. Check out these tips below to help you come up with your own sweet creations at home!

  • Textures are essential to dessert composition. It provides contrast and complexity, pleasing the palette. From a graham cracker crunch, to a fluffy mousse, variety in texture is everything.
  • Flavors that go together can create perfect harmony on a plate; however, flavors that do not make sense together can completely throw off the balance of a dessert. Example: acidic fruit, such as oranges, pair well with bitter, dark chocolate to highlight one another’s flavor. Combining delicate flavors, such as jasmine tea and elderflower, confuse the palette.
  • Temperature control is a lot harder than it sounds. Having hot and ice-cold elements are delightful to eat together, but managing the placement and service of such items takes good planning and execution.
  • Contrast brings together many different elements like texture, flavor, and temperature. Have you ever eaten molten chocolate cake with vanilla ice cream? Simple and divine, the warm, moist chocolate center is amazing against each cold, refreshing bite of ice cream. Pastry chefs strive to create these interesting contrasts daily.
  • Complexity and cohesiveness sound like different principles, but they actually effect one another, so they need to be carefully considered. If a dessert is well-conceived and exhibits the right amount of complexity, it will feel cohesive. It is important for desserts to have a certain amount of depth, while still looking like one idea on a plate.
  • Knife skills are often attributed to cooking, but they are also important for baking. How do you think a petit four has a perfect edge to it or an orange sûpreme is achieved with precision? It is because the pastry chef has achieved extraordinary knife skills.
  • Baking skills are second nature to pastry chefs, but these skills must first be taught. From day 1 of the Professional Pastry Arts program, students are first taught the essentials of baking, both theory and practical skills, in order to build any type of plated desserts.
  • Plate design and composition is the synthesis of all the elements on the plate. No matter the diversity of ingredients, the finished dessert needs to be appealing to the eye and manageable to consume. Understanding basic design principles, such as spacial organization and color use, takes practice and creativity.A student plating
  • Recipe writing and the science behind a recipe is no joke! Most people don’t realize that there are structural elements to a good recipe and steps for recipe development, but in ICC’s immersive Pastry Arts program, students learn to write and even create their very own recipes.
  • Time management is the final piece to the dessert creation puzzle. Whether it’s managing their mise en place over several days or placing the last garnish on a plate, students always need to know how to manage their time in order to perfectly execute their plate.
Chef Joan Roca

Cooking With One of the World’s Top Restaurants at ICC

Chef Roca platingICC was fortunate to have world-renowned Chef Joan Roca, Co-owner & Executive Chef of El Celler de Can Roca—named in the top five on Restaurant Magazine’s coveted World’s 50 Best Restaurants list since 2009, visit for the only demonstration and lecture in NYC this September.

The annual BBVA-sponsored world culinary tour brought Chef Roca and the culinary team of El Celler de Can Roca to New York City for two dinners at Cipriani Wall Street for invited diners to enjoy a taste of the contemporary Catalan cuisine showcased at their Girona, Spain-based restaurant. As part of this partnership, select International Culinary Center students were invited to work in the kitchen with Chef Joan Roca and the El Celler de Can Roca team to prepare for the dinners.

Jeffrey Kim plating

 

 

This special volunteer opportunity was only open to International Culinary Center students to cook alongside the Roca team for six consecutive days and learn some of their innovative techniques first hand. At the end of the event, Jeffrey Kim, one of the hand selected student volunteers, was chosen by the Roca team to receive a scholarship to continue his education through an internship at the El Celler de Can Roca restaurant. He will train for 4 months at the restaurant, which is currently ranked No. 2 restaurant in the world on the 2018 World’s 50 Best Restaurant list.

During Chef Roca’s demo, he shared the key concepts and philosophy that drives the restaurant’s innovative spirit. Read about three of the driving forces behind his team’s creativity, which were clearly displayed in the activities that took place throughout the week!

Curiosity

A student working with tomatoesDuring Chef Roca’s demo, ICC students and alumni explored their curiosity as Chef Roca shared stories about his life, restaurant, and the importance of family. At El Celler De Can Roca, family is everything. The restaurant is in the same small town of Girona, Spain where he and his brothers grew up. Just down the street stands the restaurant their parents started 60 years ago.

Even though they are one of the best restaurants in the world, Chef Roca’s “Roca Lab,” where his team uses top of the line technology to invent new food for the restaurant, allows him and his team to always foster their curiosity. In order to stay the best, they must consistently learn and develop new ideas— the same goes for any restaurant in the world. Chef Roca told the students and alumni to “always remain curious.” Just as Chef Joan and his team came up with the idea to cook veal for 70 hours at 55ºF, our students will one day come up with new ideas for the culinary world as well!

Daring

For Chef Roca’s exclusive pop-up dinner, hosted through a long-term partnership with BBVA and the brothers, 8 courses were served using his signature sous vide techniques. From the world-renowned dish featuring 5 bites from their travels around the world, to the widely known prawn with vinegar dish, diners were wowed by his daring and inventive courses.Chef Roca

10 culinary and pastry students from ICC joined Chef Roca the week prior to the dinner to help prepare the 8-course menu and learn from Chef Roca and his team. Throughout this experience, the student’s education from ICC was brought to fruition as they sorted mushrooms by size, learned how to cook razor clams at a low temperature, and developed their plating skills with a man who is known for his precision and keen eye for design.

Knowledge

The students that participatedThe third key concept of the Roca brother’s empire, knowledge, is also at the heart of ICC. With knowledge, our students are able to join their respective industries and succeed wherever they go with the skills and determination to build the culinary career they desire.

Knowledge is also a key factor in in how the Roca brother’s each became experts in their respective fields. They also possess a passion for sharing their knowledge with others, which is why in each city they travel to, they offer a culinary student the chance of a lifetime, to study beside them at their restaurant! Through demonstrating his exemplary knowledge, skill and hard work, ICC student Jeffrey Kim won a four month Jeffrey and Chef Rocainternship, all expenses paid, at their restaurant in Girona, Spain.

Jeffrey says that he is “…excited to be in the restaurant and learn the attention to detail that is required at the level of El Celler de Can Roca. Every day that we were learning from them, we learned so much, so to learn from the Roca team in a four month period will be exciting.” 

We’re so proud of Jeffrey and all of the ICC students who were selected to volunteer with the El Celler de Can Roca team. They displayed a level of maturity and skill that matched the expertise of Chef Roca’s team well!

See the full gallery of photos from Chef Roca’s Dinner & Masterclass on our Facebook here.
Click here to read about our master class with Chef Jordi Roca, Executive Pastry Chef of El Celler de Can Roca, back in 2014.

A dish from Suyo Gastrofusion

ICC In The News: Highlights from September 2018

ICC In The News provides monthly highlights from articles published around the world that feature alumni, deans, faculty and more within the ICC community. Stories of our 15,000+ alumni network and their successes are continuously popping up across various prestigious publications. Below, we have brought together some of our favorites from September 2018, aimed to keep you connected with our community and inspire readers to #LoveWhatYouDo in the kitchen and beyond.

Tim Ma, a 2009 alumni of our Professional Culinary Arts program,  is now the Chief Culinary Officer of Box’d Eats, a school-lunch delivery service. Described as a Blue Apron meets Lunchables, read all about it here.

Yale University’s School of Public Health is set to host its first conference on olive oil next month. Tassos Kyriakides, the department chair at Yale’s School of Public Health, came up with the idea for the conference after completing the Olive Oil Sommelier Certification Program at ICC. Read about the conference here.

A dish from Suyo Gastrofusion
NEW YORK TIMES

ELEVATED YAKITORI, DIRECT FROM JAPAN, IN THE WEST VILLAGE

Chef Andy Sen Sang, a native of Ecuador who moved to the Bronx and graduated in 2015, owns Suyo Gastrofusion. His restaurant blends Asian and Latin influences in dishes like steamed pork belly buns, and charred octopus with chorizo quinoa. Check out his feature in the New York Times here.

Little Havana in Washington, D.C. is in the talented hands of Chef Joseph Osorio. He is a graduate, and trained his whole life by cooking in the kitchen with his Cuban immigrant godmother, preparing him to serve Cubano sandwiches and egg rolls, Cuban chicken stews and whole fried fish. Check it out if you’re in D.C.!

The Olive Oil Sommelier Certification Program jointly produced by the Olive Oil Times Education Lab and ICC will be offered in central London this January. It is the first time the course, which has trained hundreds of industry professionals, chefs and enthusiasts in olive oil quality assessment since it began in 2016, will venture beyond its annual New York and California sessions. Click here to learn more.

ICC in the News Article
NEW YORK TIMES

A FINE- DINING VETERAN TURNS TO STREET FOOD

Food & Wine Article on Instagram for Restaurants
FOOD AND WINE
FIVE NEW WAYS RESTAURANTS ARE USING INSTAGRAM TO DRIVE BUSINESS

How can restaurants and food businesses use Instagram to drive business? Check out these 5 tips we learned with Food & Wine in our event with Instagram for Business last month, and see why it’s more important than ever for aspiring culinary entrepreneurs!

Chef Nick Nikolopoulos graduated from our Professional Pastry Arts program and now owns Stirling, NJ bakery Gluten Free Gloriously. He says he is now creating gluten-free baked goods that taste like the real thing. Don’t miss his bakery, read more here!

A group of olive oil professionals and enthusiasts gathered in Campbell, California in early September to attend the Olive Oil Sommelier Certification Program. The six-day course produced by the Olive Oil Times Education Lab and ICC provided in-depth instruction in olive oil production, quality management, advanced sensory assessment and culinary applications. Click here to learn more about the program.

With conversations buzzing about the resurgence of the Jewish Deli, some are surprised to learn that they’re having a moment in places you’d least expect. Take ICC grad Jerrod Rosen’s deli, Rye Society, which debuted in July in Denver’s River North Art District. Read more here about his desire to open a place with soul that would incorporate his family traditions in this Washington Post article.

NEW YORK TIMES

RANCH NATION

cheese souffle
FOOD AND WINE
THE 40 BEST-EVER RECIPES FROM FOOD & WINE

For Food and Wine’s 40th birthday, they looked back at their favorite recipes ever—including two from our deans! In the inaugural issue of Food & Wine, legendary chef Jacques Pépin shared his recipe for the perfect soufflé. Then, in 1979, Paula Wolfert penned an article about great Alsatian chefs cooking their mothers’ food. Included was André Soltner, then the chef at the legendary Lutèce, and he opted to recreate his mother’s outstanding potato pie. Get the recipes here.

Jhonel Faelnar
WINE & SPIRITS

BEST NEW SOMMELIERS 2018

Jhonel Faelnar, Wine Director at Atomix in NYC and graduate of our Intensive Sommelier Training program, is one of Wine and Spirits magazine’s Best New Sommeliers of 2018. Read about our graduate and his prestigious recognition here.

Chef Jacques Torres Sugar

3 Tips For Working With Sugar from Jacques Torres

Chef Jacques Torres and his Sugar ShowpieceDean of Pastry Arts, Chef Jacques Torres stopped by ICC’s New York campus this month to show our students how to work with sugar. Working with sugar is no simple task—it takes years of practice, skill and patience. Watching Chef Torres work with sugar is like watching Picasso paint; it is awe-inspiring, and he makes manipulating and shaping the difficult medium look easy.

For this demo, “Mr. Chocolate” decided to work with something a little different than chocolate—sugar! He created a showpiece featuring a shimmering sugar swan and a lifelike sugar rose. Throughout the hour and a half demo, he shared his insider tips to working with sugar after many years of experience. Below, we highlight some of our favorite tips from him to help you pull and pour sugar like the pros!

1. Sugar Becomes Shiny Through the Process of Satiné

Through the process of pulling the sugar, air is incorporated. As you continue to work with it, a sheen appears. But, be careful not to pull it too much, or else it will become dull!

Chef Jacques Torres Satinizing sugarChef Jacques Torres Satinizing sugar

2. Silicone Molds Will Mold Sugar, but...

…dough will work too! The fat in the dough makes it so the sugar and the dough will never stick together. The temperature difference of the two help to mold the sugar into the desired shape. This is what pastry chefs used before silicone molds were invented!

Chef Jacques Torres pouring sugar

3. Be Sure to Move your Sugar

When your pulled sugar is under a heat lamp, be sure to move it around every so often. This will ensure it keeps the right temperature. Because the heat is on the top of the sugar, it is important to continually flip the sugar so the temperature stays consistent.

Chef Jacques Torres moving his sugar under the heat lamp

If you’re inspired to learn how to make a sugar showpiece like Jacques Torres, check out ICC’s Professional Pastry Arts program where 60 hours of instruction are dedicated to sugar-focused décor, including showpieces like this!

Business Bites raise the bar with your beverage program

Business Bites: Raise the Bar with Your Beverage Program

The BUSINESS BITES SERIES, brought to you by the Culinary Entrepreneurship program at ICC, is a series of workshops, discussion panels and networking events designed to support entrepreneurs in the food industry. Each event is designed to provide education, information and the opportunity to connect with industry experts in a collaborative setting.

BUSINESS BITES: RAISE THE BAR WITH YOUR BEVERAGE PROGRAM

DEVELOP AND MANAGE YOUR WINE, BEER & SPIRITS

Thursday, November 1st | 6:30-8:00pm
International Culinary Center
462 Broadway, 2nd Floor Theater

Turning your beverage program into a profitable venture for your business takes a lot of hard work, but with the right knowledge and dedication, it can be the key to your restaurant, bar or food business’ success and longevity. From preventing over pouring to curating the best cocktail, beer and wine lists for your audience, learn how to navigate some of the common mistakes that many restaurants make, and understand the impact that your beverage program can have on your profitability.

So what do you need to know to turn your drinks to dollars?

Join us for an informative discussion with experts in the beverage industry—including wine directors, beverage consultants, bar owners, and distributors—to help make your beverage program more liquid. Our panel of experts will share tips and tools for getting started, how to grow and manage your beverage menu, finding the right solutions for your restaurant or bar, and more. You’ll also have ample time for networking and the opportunity to learn how ICC’s Culinary Entrepreneurship program can take you from concept to business plan & pitch in just 6-weeks!

MODERATOR

Alek Marfisi, Upwind Strategies
Alek Marfisi – Owner, Upwind Strategies & ICC Entrepreneurship Instructor

Alek Marfisi is a native New Yorker with a passion for building things and helping people. After working advising small businesses for five years, Alek launched Upwind Strategies in 2015 with the mission of providing deeper and more relatable services to small businesses: the anti-business-school services firm. He previously worked with the NYS Small Business Development Center where he dove into the exciting intricacies of making entrepreneurial projects a reality. Since then, Alek has logged more than 11,000 hours working with small businesses and has been recognized as one of the top drivers of economic development in the country.

PANELISTS

jason hedges
Jason Hedges, Bar Director of Gotham Bar & Grill and Partner of BarIQ

Jason Hedges is a New York based wine and spirits professional. He currently works as bar director and sommelier at Gotham Bar and Grill. He is a judge of both wine and spirits for The Ultimate Beverage Challenge and also sits on the tasting panel for Wine and Spirits Magazine. Jason has developed award winning beverage programs for multiple Michelin rated restaurants in NYC. He is passionate about creating quality.

Jason is a Court of Master Sommelier’s Certified Sommelier, and has also successfully completed the coveted Beverage Alcohol Resource’s intensive course and is certified with distinction.

noah
Noah Rothbaum, Editor of Half Full from The Daily Beast

Noah Rothbaum is the editor of The Daily Beast’s Half Full section. He also hosts the podcast Life Behind Bars with legendary cocktail historian David Wondrich.

In addition, Rothbaum is the author of the book The Art of American Whiskey: A Visual History of the Nation’s Most Storied Spirit, through 100 Iconic Labels and the associate editor of the forthcoming Oxford Companion to Spirits and Cocktails. Rothbaum’s first book, The Business of Spirits: How Savvy Marketers, Innovative Distillers, and Entrepreneurs Changed How We Drink, was published in 2007.

According to Chicago magazine’s chief dining critic, Jeff Ruby, “Rothbaum knows drinking like Newton knew gravity, but he’s not all high and mighty about it, creating laws and whatnot.” And The Wall Street Journal’s Speakeasy blog called him “one of the smartest tipplers (and writers on spirits) we know.”

He is the former editor-in-chief of Liquor.com, and has contributed to the Wall Street JournalNew York TimesO MagazineDetailsMen’s JournalMen’s FitnessFood & WineGastronomica, and more.

Nora Favelukes
Nora Z. Favelukes, President of QW Wine Experts

Leading Expert on Imported Wines to the United States, Influencer, Spokesperson, Presenter and Moderator.

Wine expert with years of international experience; equipped with rare understanding of the inner workings and complexities of the U.S., South American and European wine industries. A skilled spokesperson, moderator, negotiator and a natural diplomat.

Ms. Favelukes entered the wine trade in her native Argentina in 1984. Her early professional credits include the post of Export Director at Bodegas Navarro Correas, Argentina. In 1988, she moved to the United States to work as East Coast Sales Manager for Vinos Argentinos. In 2000, she became National Sales Manager for Billington Imports – where she was responsible for the introduction of Bodegas Catena. And, from 1995 through 2001 she was Director of Fine Wines for Palm Bay Imports.

Today, Ms. Favelukes is President of QW Wine Experts, a consulting firm she launched in 1995, which is dedicated to the nationwide public relations, marketing and sales of imported fine wines to the United States market.

Professional credits:
•Past-President of the Wine Council of Argentina in the United States
•Guest lecturer on South American Wines
•The Foreign Service Institute in Washington DC
•The Department of Nutrition and Food Studies at New York University
•New York City College of Technology on South American and Iberian Peninsula

urce’s intensive course and is certified with distinction.

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Vanessa Da Silva, Sommelier at Ninety Acres

Vanessa Da Silva grew up in rural Maine. While studying abroad in Florence, Italy, she took a recreational wine class and became enamored with wine.  After graduating from the University of Maine with a Bachelor’s degree in Marketing & International Business, Vanessa pursued a career in marketing but soon realized her budding interest in wine was more than a hobby. Vanessa completed the Intensive Sommelier Training Course at the International Culinary Center in January of 2013 and simultaneously passed the Court of Master Sommeliers Introductory and Certified exams.

After several years working as a Sommelier in Manhattan restaurants, Vanessa returned to the ICC where she took on the role of the Wine Coordinator, working on the educational side of wine. In 2017, Vanessa decided to return to the restaurant industry and took on a role at Ninety Acres – a farm-to-table restaurant in Pepack, New Jersey. Vanessa is currently honing her Sommelier skills as she prepares for the Court of Master Sommeliers Advanced Examination.

Nick Lee

Nick Lee, ICC Culinary Student, Wins World Umami Cooking Competition!

Competes against five top culinary schools for an all expense-paid culinary tour in Japan.

The first-ever World Umami Forum, presented by Ajinomoto this past September, brought food science experts, renowned researchers and top culinary professionals together for a two-day consortium aimed at deepening the understanding of umami and it’s essential role in American cuisine, as well as opened the conversation about monosodium glutamate and some of the common myths surrounding MSG.

As part of the conference, the World Umami Forum challenged six semi-finalists from America’s top culinary schools in the inaugural United States of Umami Cooking Competition, held on September 20th, to create their best original, umami-rich recipe in the form of a signature entrée. ICC was honored to be selected as one of the six culinary schools, including The Culinary Institute of America and Johnson & Wales University, to participate in the competition. Through an internal selection process led by ICC’s Director of Culinary Arts & Technology, Chef Hervé Malivert, Professional Culinary Arts student Nick Lee was selected to represent ICC in the competition. (Nick was selected for the competition while a student at ICC, but has recently graduated from the program).

Judged on technique and taste, these culinary students went head-to-head for a chance to win an all-expense paid culinary trip to Japan. After months of preparation refining his umami-rich recipe and one-on-one practice with ICC’s resident culinary competition coach, Chef Hervé, we’re excited to announce that ICC student, Nick Lee, was selected as the winner of the competition! We couldn’t be more proud to share Nick’s journey to victory with all of you, and the recipe behind his winning dish.

Born in South Korea, Nick grew up in the United States with a love for experiencing different cultures—travelling through various countries and living in Japan, China, and Cambodia for a time. Nick holds a Bachelors of Science degree in both Mechanical Engineering and Psychology from the University of Illinois, and his unique career background ranges from engineering, accounting and military, to hotel management—he’s worked both front of house & back of house in hotel restaurants. Having always been passionate about food, Nick decided to pursue this passion by enrolling in the International Culinary Center’s Professional Culinary Arts program in January 2018. He is currently in his final externship level of the program at Jean Georges’ Mercer Kitchen in Soho.

In preparation for the competition, Nick trained one-on-one for months with our Director of Culinary Arts & Technology, Chef Hervé Malivert. Chef Hervé has coached many ICC students in competition to success including: Rose Weiss, winner of the 2011 Bocuse d’Or Commis Competition; Christopher Ravanello, Northeast Regional winner of the 2012 S. Pellegrino Almost Famous Chef Competition; Colfax Selby, Northeast Regional winner of the 2015 S. Pellegrino Almost Famous Chef Competition; Mimi Chen, winner of the 2016 Ment’or Commis competition. Through this preparation and hard work, Nick refined his recipe, timing and plating to be able to come home to ICC victorious as the 1st place winner!

The main requirement of the competition was to create an original dish circled around the theme of umami. While Nick had many directions he could have pursued for his dish, he was passionate about using all the umami ingredients that were naturally rich in MSG. That left him with ingredients like kombu, Parmigiano Reggiano, tomatoes and shiitake mushrooms. From there, he wanted to create a dish that embodied both western and eastern influences that would best represent ICC in his mind. A dish in South Korea that translates to an abalone porridge came to his mind, and he thought making a risotto out of this dish would be a great way to elevate the flavors of the ingredients he wanted to work with.

Check out Nick’s winning recipe below and you’ll see why his dish took home the gold!

Butter Poached Abalone

Served with Roasted Mushroom Risotto and Oven Dried Tomatoes

YIELD: 4 Servings

The winning dish

 

The winning dish

INGREDIENTS

For the Kombu Stock

200 g dashi kombu

200 g onion (2 whole onions)

100 g dried shiitake mushroom

200 g daikon radish

200 g leek, cleaned

6 cloves garlic

3 kg water

For the Oven Dried Tomatoes

300 g cherry tomato

140 g extra virgin olive oil

10 g parsley, chopped fine

10 g basil, chopped fine

10 g thyme sprigs

Salt and pepper to taste

For the Seaweed Crisp

20 g seaweed sheet

80 g rice flour

50 g water

10 g sesame seeds

10 g sugar

50 g soy sauce

300 g kombu stock

10 g sesame oil

Salt and pepper to taste

For the Abalone

5 ~ 6 fresh abalone

280 g butter

Salt and pepper to taste

For the Risotto

60 g extra virgin olive oil

100 g shallots, very finely chopped

80 g cremini mushroom, finely chopped

500 g Arborio rice

30 g soy sauce

125 g dry white wine

1 ½ kg kombu stock, or as needed*

60 g butter, plus an additional 60 g for finishing the risotto

100 g freshly grated Parmigiano Reggiano

Salt and pepper to taste

 

For the Roasted Mushroom

200 g oyster mushroom

200 g shitake mushroom

200 g maitake mushroom

1 bunch of rosemary

2 head of garlic

For Service

50 g purple radish microgreen

50 g Brussels sprout leaves

Extra virgin olive oil

PROCEDURE

For the Kombu Stock

  1. Cut kombu into squares and steep in some of the water used for the stock.
  2. Put kombu and the water steeped in into a large pot and add aromatic elements.
  3. Bring everything to boil and take kombu out immediately once it starts to boil.
  4. Strain the stock carefully and set aside for use.

For the Cherry Tomato Confit

  1. Preheat convection oven to 300°
  2. Cut tomatoes in half, in a bowl season with S/P and olive oil.
  3. Baked in oven on a bed of thyme for about 45 min or until tomato done.
  4. Once the tomatoes are done add the herbs and set aside.

For the Roasted Mushrooms

  1. Clean and cut mushrooms to desired size, season with XV olive oil, salt and pepper.
  2. Bake in 350°F convection oven on top of a bed a rosemary, until cooked and golden brown.
  3. Remove and set aside.

For the Seaweed Crisp

  1. Mix rice flour and water together to make batter.
  2. Cut seaweed into squares and apply batter on one side of seaweed. Sprinkle sesame seed on top of battered side of seaweed.
  3. Fry seaweed in 325°F, take it out to a cooling rack with paper towel when it starts to brown.
  4. Combine kombu stock, soy sauce, sugar until ¼ of original volume.
  5. Add sesame oil to reduced stock and drizzle over battered side of seaweed.

For the Abalone

  1. Separate abalone from the shell with a spoon.
  2. Make quadrillage mark on top of the abalone using a knife.
  3. Season each side of abalone with salt and pepper and sear until brown on each side.
  4. Butter poach abalone gently.
  5. Remove transfer to a container, smoked slightly and cover until service.
  6. On the same butter poached the Brussels sprout leaves right before serving.

For the Risotto

  1. Bring the stock to a slow, steady simmer in a russe.
  2. In a wide, shallow sautoir, sweat the finely chopped shallots and cremini mushroom in 60 g butter until soft and translucent.
  3. Add the rice and stir with a wooden spoon until it is hot and evenly coated with fat.
  4. Add the white wine and simmer until it has evaporated.
  5. Add enough of the stock to just cover the rice, stirring constantly with the wooden spoon, keeping the sides and bottom of the pot clean as you stir. Keep the rice at a brisk simmer and stir continuously. Continue adding stock a ½ cup at a time, until the liquid is absorbed, and maintain the heat at a lively pace.
  6. Taste the rice after 12-15 minutes. The rice is done when it is tender but still firm to the bite. As you approach the final minutes of cooking, gradually reduce the amount of stock that you add. The liquid should be a little soupy because the addition of the final ingredients will tighten up the risotto.
  7. Off the heat, add the roasted mushrooms, soy sauce, the remaining 60 g of butter, and grated Parmigiano Reggiano. Season with salt and pepper. Stir the risotto energetically with the wooden spoon to whip the ingredients together. The consistency of the rice should be thick and creamy but still have movement, so add a few drops of stock if necessary to achieve the correct consistency.

For Service

  1. Spoon risotto into warm bowls.
  2. Slice Abalone ¼ inch thick on a bias.
  3. Garnish with seaweed crisps cherry tomato, Brussels sprout leaves, and micro purple radish.
Barrel of Sherry

Certified Sherry Wine Specialist Seminar

Lustau, maker of top quality Sherries, presents a brand new wine certification available to all wine students and aficionados: the Certified Sherry Wine Specialist. Offered by Lucas Payà, Certified Sherry Educator and Lustau’s Brand Educator, this brief course offers Intermediate Level study material that has been reviewed and approved by the Regulatory Council of Jerez.

After many successful SOLD OUT workshops, ICC has partnered with Lustau again to host certification classes in both NY and CA. Buy your tickets below!

Saturday, October 6th
10:00am-12:30pm
International Culinary Center
700 West Hamilton Ave | Campbell, CA 95008

Cost: $40 per person

Thursday, November 15th
3:30pm-6:00pm
International Culinary Center
28 Crosby St, 5th Floor | New York, NY 10013

Cost: $35 per person

EVENT DETAILS

The program consists of a 2.5-hour class that includes:

    • Instruction on the history, geography, climate, viticulture, wine-making, and wine styles.  When studying the styles of sherry, students will learn about their differences, pairings, and best ways to serve.
    • A tasting of 6 wines, including all the basic styles (Fino, Amontillado, Oloroso, and Dulce).
    • A 28-question test, graded after the course to award the Certified Sherry Wine Specialist recognition to those with a passing score of 20 or higher.

The Certificate of Achievement will be signed by both Lustau’s CEO and César Saldaña, Director of the Regulatory Council of Jerez. They will be numbered and a list of those that passed the course will be shared with the Regulatory Council.  A Certificate of Recognition will be issued to those that do not achieve the passing grade but only signed by Lustau.

Attendees must be at least 21 years of age.