Chef Aarón Sánchez Talks Mentorship at Exclusive ICC Demo

In January, the ICC New York campus facilities received a visit from the esteemed Chef Aarón Sánchez. During his visit, Chef Aarón demonstrated some techniques behind creating authentic Mexican cuisine with the help of current ICC Professional Culinary Arts student, Oswaldo Rios.

Oswaldo was selected from a pool of more than 40 applicants to become the first-ever recipient of the Aarón Sánchez Scholarship Fund for aspiring chefs from the New Orleans Latino community. The program pays to send the recipient to ICC and provides other career development support back in New Orleans. Oswaldo, who will be graduating the International Culinary Center’s program in 2018, has expressed a keen sense of work ethic, ambition and understanding of mentoring.

Following the inspiring demonstration, we caught up with Chef Sánchez to discuss the importance of having a mentor during your culinary studies and how having guidance from another chef can help to shape your culinary career.

ICC: Why do you think that mentorship is so important for young, aspiring chefs? 

I think it’s important to have structure and a constant source of inspiration which you can get from a good mentor. When you see that your goals are tangible if you have a great work ethic, passion and resilience, it can keep you going through the tough times. A mentor can also serve as a reminder to honor your legacy or heritage and to carry on family and cultural traditions.”

ICC: Who would you consider to be your mentor? Why?  

My mentors were my Mom and Abuela of course, as well as Chef Paul Prudhomme. They were my mentors for many reasons and offered a variety of lessons in different stages of my life and career. My family has always been run by strong women who stayed true to their roots while putting their own flare and touch on everything they created, they each had their own style. Chef Paul taught me the basics and really ingrained the building blocks for success in me. He imparted so much knowledge over the years, but I would say that he always told me to do my research and have a deep understanding of ingredients, techniques and regional cuisines.

ICC: What piece of advice would you pass along to Oswaldo, the first recipient of the scholarship, or any future mentees that you feel would be invaluable throughout their culinary careers? 

Work hard, find your voice, always be curious and keep learning, explore and travel as much as you can. Honor your culture and preserve your legacy.  “


Culinary Clash Student Cooking Competition & Scholarship Fundraiser Continues in San Francisco March 10-11

Written by Yi YeoJin
Chef Instructor/Farm to Table Coordinator
International Culinary Center®

Culinary Clash is a pretty long competition where students have been investing their time outside of class, from December 2017 to now.

Throughout this time lapse, a lot happens!  There are preliminary cooking competitions to sub-sequential competitions that are both held here at ICC, CA. From there, I meet with each group multiple times to refine their menus. This is really the fun part for the students. They get to showcase their hard work, but pitch their own menu and get to run the course at their respective hotels for one night. Each team gets to taste a little of what it feels like to manage a kitchen. Hopefully, it shows them that it’s not just skill sets and talent but communication and working with a team that leads to success.

All the while, on their own time, they are constantly pushing themselves to represent something they are proud to serve their friends, family, and the judges table.

For me, I have a lot of fun seeing the development of these students. You can see them forming ownership of their menus and I have the responsibility of fostering their empowerment. By the time they nail their menus by practicing at school, they face another challenge which is going to a totally new kitchen and workspace to replicate what they have done at school..simultaneously, communicating with their partner and hotel Chef for delegating tasks and finding out where ingredients/equipment are!

I am asking a lot out of them, but I know they are all capable. I’ve been running these competitions at ICC for the past three years and each year we always have something noteworthy to look back on. This year doesn’t fall short either. Looking forward to another stressful, enduring, sweaty yet thrilling and exciting competition this year! Lookout for us in May at the Ultimate Clash in DC!

Check out the student-curated menus and teams for March 10 and March 11.

Nob Hill Club – Chef Selah Kendall and Sous Chef Andrae Gray (March 10)

MENU: Pork and shrimp wonton with mushroom and lemongrass tisane; Diver scallop with wilted dandelion green, bacon marmalade and pomegranate; Sesame crème brulee with Meyer lemon ice cream*

Selah Kendall has been cooking ever since she could reach the stove on a stool. She worked various jobs in the restaurant industry with her very first at a local pizza parlor in Montclair, New Jersey, where she answered the phone and took orders.  Her biggest inspiration is her Great Aunt Jenne who was raised in Jamaica. She taught Selah her first skills in the kitchen and “how to cook with love.”

Watching his grandmothers and parents cook gave Andrae Gray a love and respect for cooking early on. “There is something about watching people’s eyes light up with total satisfaction when you serve them something so delicious and fulfilling. It’s a feeling that I got while watching family cook and I love seeing it on faces now.” Gray was born and raised in California’s Central Valley.

Luce – Chef Hannah Gomez and Sous Chef Molly Doster (March 11)

MENU: Hamachi Crudo; Prawn Enchilada a la Cubana; Blood Orange olive oil cake*

Currently enrolled in the ICC’s Professional Culinary Arts program, Hannah Gomez brings with her a degree in entrepreneurial management and two years of running her own business to the kitchen. Born and raised in the Philippines, she always had a passion for cooking, learning from her mother, relatives and friends.

Born and raised on a farm in Iowa, Molly Doster’s journey to the International Culinary Center began in the home kitchen. “I am one of six children, which lent itself to cooking both volumes and varieties. My mom encouraged me to give the culinary field a look.” Molly is inspired by chefs including Argentina’s Francis Mallmann and hopes to one day own and operate a restaurant or bed and breakfast on her family farm.

*menus are subject to change

When: Remaining dates at Nob Hill Club at InterContinental Mark Hopkins and Luce at the                            InterContinental San Francisco are as follows:

  • Saturdays – March 10 and 17 from 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. at Nob Hill Club at the InterContinental Mark Hopkins (One Nob Hill); for reservations contact Joanna Carrasco at 415-616-6940 or
  • Sundays – March 11, 18, and 25 from 5:30 p.m. – 8:30 p.m. at Luce at the InterContinental San Francisco (888 Howard Street); for reservations contact Luce at 415-616-6566, or visit Openable.

Hospitality Leaders Tips for Landing your Dream Interview

Submitted by: Jackie McMann-Oliveri, PHR
Director of Human Resources – Bobby Flay Restaurants and ICC Culinary Entrepreneurship Lecturer

Selection and hiring in our wonderful world of Hospitality is everything because we are only as good as the people who work for us.  We work long, we work hard, it is hot in the kitchen and crazy on the floor and one of the main ingredients in success is passion.  I am certain that we can train knife skills and we can train steps of service, but passion – we need you all to bring it!

When asked to write this article, of course, I was stoked!  Then I thought, I can easily be the boring ‘HR Lady’…. or how about I get by with a little help from my friends?

So, I reached out to some of our industry greats to ask them their tips on how to land the interview you desire and some of their culinary interviewing go to questions. Along with their help and my own expertise, we are certain to set you up for success.  Identifying and supporting great talent has been my passion for many years, I am amazingly lucky to have access to some of the very best in the industry (and don’t forget the food) and I also get to share my knowledge, stories and passion with the ICC community.

Hospitality Leaders Tips for Landing your Dream Interview
  1. Own and know your Personal brand – Know your mission, values, social presence and goals and integrate them in all you do. Some of our core values at Bobby’s Burger Palace are being fast, friendly, focused and fun.  What are yours and how do you live them? – Me! 
  1. “Do your research! It is important to know the mission and philosophy of the company as well as what restaurants it runs.  This ensures that we understand what you are looking for in a career and that those goals are aligned with the excellence we pursue.” Kim DiPalo, Talent Manager – Union Square Hospitality Group
  1. “ABC, Always Be Communicating!  Whether it’s LinkedIn, via email, over the phone, or in person, building a rapport is increasingly important.  Everyone’s time is valuable, and unfortunately less and less time is being spent on interviewing.  It’s imperative to success that those participating have a good understanding of the expectations, timelines, and an open, honest dialog throughout the process.” Amedeo Agresti, General Manager – Rosa Mexicano, Lincoln Center location
  1. “Confidence is great, cockiness is not. Humble professionals are the best. Listen more than you talk, you are the one being interviewed, don’t interview your interviewer. Smile, Smile, Smile, give a firm handshake and make eye contact. A great way to impress your interviewer and feel more confident is to do some homework beforehand. In an ideal world you would visit the establishment to see what the environment is like before the interview. If making it in is not possible, do some research online, learn about the menu, read the about page on the website, look at their social media channels etc, so that it seems as though you care and want to immerse yourself into the culture. When candidates walk in knowing about me and the restaurants, I am always impressed. “ – Michael Chernow, Owner – Seamore’s, Founding Partner – Well Well, Co-Founder – The Meatball Shop and ICC Alum and Lecturer

Chefs Go-To Culinary Interview Questions:

“What do you cook at home?” I ask this because I want to know that food is part of their life, not just a job. If they do cook at home, it shows me they carry food over into their personal life and I can see what they cook with and who they fed. It is important to me to have people that think about food and the culture of food so they always bring a fresh perspective to the job of cooking for people. Bradford Thompson – Owner, Bellyfull Consulting, Inc., Chef, Mentor and ICC Lecturer

“Please walk me through your experience job by job and explain to me how you got the job, how you like the job, what you learned from the job, what you disliked and the circumstances surrounding you’re leaving” – Daniel Holzman, Chef and Co-Founder – The Meatball Shop, Founding Partner – Project Foodie and ICC Guest Lecturer

“What is your secret ingredient?” “Fill in the blank – there’s never enough_____!” Christina Tosi, Chef, Founder, Owner – Milk Bar and ICC alum­­

“When I’m hiring a cook for one of my restaurants, and I want to see what they can do, I usually ask them to make me an omelette.” – Bobby Flay, Food Network Personality, Chef and owner – Gato, Bar Americain, Bobby Flay Steak, Bobby’s Burger Palace and Alum of the First Class of the French Culinary Institute, now our beloved ICC

What our advice all has in common is the basics, the passion and the accountability that is needed to make it in this business.  My chefs and restaurant managers know and love (and sometimes hate) how many times I tell them…  “The more time we spend hiring, the less time we spend firing”.

Follow our tips and prepare for our questions. Listening to our tips will guide you to land the interview and the restaurant job of your dreams!


Students of ICC’s Professional Culinary Arts program are in the kitchen cooking from day one under the watchful eyes of accomplished chef-instructors, learning from a curriculum established by world-renowned deans such as Jacques PepinAndré Soltner and Cesare Casella. With help from ICC’s on-going Career Services, students leave with the credentials and connections to pursue careers in the culinary industry. For more information about landing your culinary dream job and enrolling at the International Culinary Center, simply complete the form on this page.

The Insider’s Guide to Nailing Your Trail

Article by David Janke
Associate Dean of Students, International Culinary Center

I am a graduate of ICC’s Professional Culinary Arts program and a former Sous Chef at a Michelin star restaurant.  As a sous chef, I had the responsibility of setting up trails, interviewing, and vetting potential employees when they would come for a trail.  Part of my role as Associate Dean of Student is managing our Career Services department and ensuring that they properly prepare our students for the most important first step in one’s professional career: the trail. For our current students–and alumni–preparing for ICC’s upcoming Career Fair, here are 5 tips to help you succeed on your next kitchen trail!


1. Be persistent!

Communication in this industry is notoriously slow, and it can be frustrating to wait several days or more for a response from a potential employer.  Always use the three day rule: if they have not gotten back to you in three days, send a follow up email.

2. Ask the right questions.

When setting up the trail, there are 3 questions you should always ask.

1) What door should I enter through?
Most of the time, kitchen staff will enter a restaurant through a different entrance that is not always so easy to find.

2) What should I wear?
Most restaurants provide uniforms, but not all of them.

3) Should I bring my knives and equipment?
Different establishments provide different equipment for their employees, so it is always good to ask.  I would always bet on at least bringing your knives in a small knife roll.

3. Be punctual!

If your trail is set to start at 8am, that means you are expected to be dressed and ready to go no later than 8am.  Always give yourself plenty of time, leave early, and plan to arrive no later than 15 mins early.

4. Be positive.

Employers are not necessarily using the trail to specifically test your knife or cooking skills.  They want to see that you are competent in the kitchen, for sure.  But what is much more important is the attitude and demeanor you bring with you.  A supervisor is really looking for someone who is positive, gladly takes on new tasks and responsibilities, and has a team player mentality.  Be sure to focus on those “soft skills” throughout the trail.

5. Send a thank you email.

After you complete your trail, always send a thank you email to the person you have been communicating with from the employer.  Even if you are not offered the job, or choose not to take the position, it sets the proper tone professionally and leaves a good impression.  In an industry where everyone seems to know everyone, reputation is important.

What is a soft skill? 

“Soft skills” in this industry are traits and attributes that are more nuanced and subtle, but just as important to employers when searching for the right candidate. While one’s hard skills – knife skills, knowledge of cooking terms and techniques, etc. – are certainly important, it is the soft skills that can play a major role in one’s success. Being punctual and always arriving early, having a positive attitude and strong work ethic, being the first to volunteer your time; these are all examples of soft skills. And the good news is, these are factors that you can control. For instance, you may not have the best knife skills yet; that is a skill set that develops over time and with practice.  However, if you show a willingness to improve and excel at other soft skills, you will be successful.


For more information on Career Services at ICC, click here.

James Beard Award 2018: ICC Alumni Semifinalists & Finalists

Each year, we are always so proud to see alumni and Deans of the International Culinary Center recognized for excellence in their field. With the recent announcements from the James Beard Foundation, we’d like to congratulate the following ICC alumni [and Dean!] for being recognized in the list of 2018 James Beard Award Semifinalists!

Following last year’s ceremony, ICC Dean and Chef, David Kinch, is nominated again for Outstanding Chef! Philadelphia institution Zahav, co-owned by ICC alumnus Steven Cook, is also nominated again for Outstanding Service. To view all ICC alumni nominees [and winners!] from the 2017 Awards, click here.

[UPDATE] With the announcement of the 2018 James Beard Award Book & Media nominees, ICC alumni and deans have received 19 nominations combined! Congratulations to the seven alumni and our dean David Kinch who made it on the short list in their respective categories! The winners will be announced later this spring, stay tuned.

2018 James Beard Award Semifinalist & Finalists [ICC Alumni & Dean List]

Orange indicates selection as finalist

Outstanding Chef Category:

Ashley Christensen, Poole’s Diner, Raleigh, NC [Sous Vide Intensive ‘12]

David Kinch, Manresa, Los Gatos, CA [ICC Dean]

Alex Roberts, Restaurant Alma, Minneapolis, MN [Culinary Arts ‘93]

Outstanding Restaurant:

L’Etoile, Madison, WI – [Tory Miller, Culinary Arts ‘00]

Momofuku Noodle Bar, NYC [David Chang, Culinary Arts ‘01]

O Ya, Boston – [Tim & Nancy Cushman, Fundamentals of Wine ‘06]

Outstanding Service:

The Red Cat, NYC [David Battin, Culinary Arts ‘12]

Saison, San Francisco [Joshua Skenes, Culinary Arts ‘01]

Sepia, Chicago [Andrew Zimmerman, Culinary Arts ‘00]

Zahav, Philadelphia [Steven Cook, Culinary Arts ‘00]

Best Chef: Mid-Atlantic

Brittanny Anderson, Brenner Pass, Richmond, VA [Culinary Arts, ‘09]

Joey Baldino, Zeppoli, Collingswood, NJ [Culinary Arts, ‘02]

Best Chef: New York City

Jeremiah Stone and Fabian von Hauske, Contra [Culinary Arts, ’07 and Culinary Arts ’09 | Pastry Arts ’10, respectively]

Best Chef: West

Evan Rich and Sarah Rich, Rich Table, San Francisco [Sarah Rich, Culinary Arts ‘01]

Joshua Skenes, Saison, San Francisco [Culinary Arts ‘01]

Book Awards: Reference, History, and Scholarship

Peppers of the Americas | Author: Maricel E. Presilla | Lorena Jones Books [Maricel E. Presilla, Culinary Techniques ‘93]

Broadcast Media Awards: Television Program, in Studio or Fixed Location

The Bobby and Damaris Show | Hosts: Bobby Flay and Damaris Phillips | Airs on: Food Network [Bobby Flay, Culinary Arts ‘84]

Journalism Awards: Dining and Travel

“The Eating Season” | Author: Tyler Kord | Bon Appétit [Tyler Kord, Culinary Arts ‘02]

Journalism Awards: Profile

“The Untold Story of the Lady from Louisville and the Bubbe Who Wasn’t There” | Author: Rebecca Flint Marx | Taste [Rebecca Flint Marx, Culinary Arts ‘08]

The 2018 James Beard Award Winners will be announced May 7, 2018. The 2018 Media Awards will be held on April 27, 2018. For the full list of 2018 James Beard Award Semifinalists, click here. 

Library Notes: Remembering Chef Paul Bocuse

Written by Sara Quiroz
ICC Librarian

On January 20th the culinary world lost a visionary chef. Chef Paul Bocuse passed away in the same room where he was born 91 years ago above his main restaurant. The king of nouvelle cuisine, Chef Bocuse received many accolades and opened many restaurants throughout the years. Yet even with all the success he remained humble. Our own Chef Alain Sailhac, Dean Emeritus, recalled when Chef Bocuse stopped by the kitchen at Le Cirque to congratulate him. The two forged a friendship that would last years with Chef Alain stopping to visit whenever he was in Lyon. Chef Paul Bocuse was not only a brilliant chef but a prolific writer, so this month in the library we are highlighting his cookbooks to honor his memory.

Paul Bocuse’s French Cooking is his first book and an absolute classic. This beautiful volume was published in 1977 and includes over 1,000 recipes including 41 omelets! Very classic recipes, methods and preparation include everything from Truffle Soup Elysee to Cassoulet Languedoc Style to French Christmas Pudding. I may have to try my hand at the Poached Pears in Beaujolais. The book even includes the exact menu for the famous luncheon Chef Bocuse prepared for President Valery Giscard d’Estaing at the Elysee Palace – including the wine list. Perfect if you want to throw an unforgettable party.

If you are looking for something more specialized (and lighter to carry home!) we have Bocuse’s Regional French Cooking. When instructor Chef Jose Menendez spotted it in the display, it brought back memories. “This is just classic! Look at these recipes, essential,” he said, leafing through the terrines, gratins and roasts. This light paperback includes more color photos than the previous guide, and rather than dividing by course, it is split up by the regions of France. From the simple seafood of Provence to the Germanic influenced dishes of Alsace, Bocuse offers his take on the traditional foods and preparations of each region.  Of course there is the most from his home of Lyon, but he includes a little something for everyone – appetizer to dessert. Try your hand at the Savory Bacon and Onion Tart or the Provencal Fish Stew – classic Bouillabaisse.

The encyclopedic Complete Bocuse covers everything you need to know from his repertoire. With a beautiful layout and design and easy to follow recipes this 2010 compendium has a wide variety of recipes both savory and sweet. Try his classic Ratatouille, Quiche Lorraine or Coq au Vin and finish everything off with an Iced Cherry Souffle.

The beautiful Alain Ducasse series, My Best includes the top ten favorite recipes of all of his famous culinary friends. Each recipe is beautifully laid out with photo illustrations for each step of the recipe. This may sound like a beginner cookbook, but these are complex recipes from the master chefs of the world.  Paul Bocuse is included with My Best: Paul Bocuse. The book opens with a lovely interview giving some insight to the chef. Did you know Paul Bocuse collected mechanical organs? Next are the 10 recipes selected by Paul Bocuse with photo layouts of both the ingredients and each step of the process. Recipes include Macaroni and Cheese, Bresse Chicken Fricassee and Apple Tart.

So stop by the library to pick up a book so you can commemorate the life of this master by recreating one of his recipes.

Alumni Spotlight: Chantale Doinel, Culinary Arts Class of 2016

As native of Normandy, France, Chantale Doinel grew up with a love of French cuisine and an appreciation for seasonality. For the last 35 years, she has been working as an esthetician and owner of a skin care salon. However, it was her passion for food and cooking that inspired her return to school to embark on a new career. Chantale graduated from the International Culinary Center’s Silicon Valley campus in 2016 with a diploma in Professional Culinary Arts. Today, she is working as a successful private chef based in the San Francisco Bay Area. We sat down with her to discuss how she switched gears professionally for a life dedicated to the culinary arts.

Thrive to improve, do not complain, and practice.”

What makes the culinary industry appealing to you?

Chantale: Whether it’s a dinner for two, a picnic in the woods, a banquet on a beach or a well-prepared sandwich on a hike, I find great satisfaction in procuring balanced and memorable meals for other people.

When did you know you wanted to work in the food industry?

Chantale: About 12 years ago, when my friends asked me to share my knowledge of regional French cuisine, I started giving them cooking lessons. I realized then that I wanted to learn more about the industry as a whole so that I could better transmit knowledge to my peers. As I am constantly eager to learn, I sought a certification to validate my qualification as a cook.

What were your greatest challenges at school and how were you able to overcome them?

Chantale:  Speed, timing and organization were challenging concepts for me, not to mention the fact that, as I went to school at night, I was working full-time during the day. I tried to overcome these obstacles by being prepared for each class, mindfully studying the  material and practicing knife skills at home.

What inspires your style of cooking?

Chantale: My mother taught me everything about traditional French family cooking. Growing up, our refrigerator was always empty as I was raised to do the shopping on a daily basis and get inspiration according to the season.  As we were a large family, my brothers and I were assigned tasks in the kitchen; from an early age we were roasting, braising, grilling, and making pastries. We often ate specialties from the Normandy region and the Loire Valley and but also exotic dishes from the places we traveled to with my father when he was in the army such as Morocco and Germany.


Follow Chantale’s culinary creations on Instagram via @chantalescuisine

Business Bites: Feed Your Social Strategy Panel

The BUSINESS BITES SERIES, brought to you by the Culinary Entrepreneurship program at ICC, is a series of workshops, discussion panels and networking events designed to support entrepreneurs in the food industry. Each event is designed to provide education, information and the opportunity to connect with industry experts in a collaborative setting.

BUSINESS BITES: Feed Your Social Strategy

Is it all just #foodporn?

Thursday, March 8th | 6:30-8:00pm
International Culinary Center
462 Broadway, 2nd Floor Theater

Social media is a way for food entrepreneurs & chefs to capture customers – to make them hungry for what you’re selling – but an effective social media strategy is more than just mouthwatering photos. Not only does it help create buzz in the market, but it can develop brand identity, build customer loyalty and provide valuable information on what moves and influences your customers.

So how do you make the most of what social media can do for your business?

Join us for an informative discussion panel where we investigate what it really means to develop a social media strategy for your food business. Our panelists will share tips, tricks and experiences on what works, what doesn’t, and how you can harness the power of social media for your business. You’ll also have ample time for networking and the opportunity to learn how ICC’s Culinary Entrepreneurship program can take you from concept to business plan & pitch in just 6-weeks!

Plus, learn more about the Stacy’s Scholarship for Female Culinary Leaders, a full-tuition scholarship to ICC’s Culinary Entrepreneurship program for women who have plans to open a culinary business!


Careers in Wine Panel at ICC

The CAREERS IN WINE PANEL AT ICC is brought to you by the Intensive Sommelier Training program and is designed to support aspiring wine professionals and seasoned industry vets with education, information and the opportunity to network with industry experts.


Restaurant Service? Distribution? Wine Making? Media? Which one is right for you.

Wednesday March 7th | 5:30-7:30pm
International Culinary Center
700 West Hamilton Ave, Campbell, CA 95008
Admission is Free, RSVP Required

Find out where you fit in the wine industry during a panel discussion with industry professionals at ICC!

The wine and beverage industry has multiple tiers and options that suit different backgrounds, personalities and lifestyles. Rachel Lintott, Associate Wine Director at ICC, will moderate a panel of professionals representing the diverse avenues available to wine career seekers including distribution, restaurants, vineyards and media. Together, we’ll explore topics such as career paths, salary scales, hiring practices, and qualities that employers are looking for in candidates. Come with your questions – open Q&A with the panelists will follow!

ICC’s Admissions team will be available to provide tours or answer questions regarding our Intensive Sommelier Training program.

Light refreshments will be provided.


Paul Mekis
Paul Mekis, Advanced Sommelier

Director of Wine, Rosewood Hotels and Resorts, Madera Restaurant Wine Director – Rosewood Sand Hill

Mary Orlin, Certified Sommelier

Executive Producer, Orlin Media/WineFashionista

Jeffrey Patterson

Winemaker and President, Mount Eden Vineyards

Somm School Social: Wine Blending

SOMM SCHOOL SOCIAL, a new meet-up group brought to you by the Intensive Sommelier Training program at ICC, is for wine lovers looking to meet with other people in the South Bay who love to learn about wine. Hosted by ICC’s Wine Department, or co-hosted with outside guests, these meet-ups feature fun, wine focused evenings that draw from our wine education arsenal. ICC’s wine theater offers the optimal learning environment to explore unique offerings in the realm of wine education, as well as engage with other wine aficionados.

Sign up to join our online community and learn about upcoming meet-ups at ICC.


Unleash Your Inner Vintner

Wednesday, February 21 | 5:30-8:30pm
International Culinary Center
700 West Hamilton Ave, Campbell, CA 95008
Tickets: $125

Play winemaker for the evening!

SOMM SCHOOL SOCIAL hosts Phil McKenney, founder of VinoBlends and The Wine Gent, who will lead participants in a unique wine-blending class. Guests will taste 100% varietal, small boutique Napa Valley wines such as Cabernet Sauvignon, Merlot and Cabernet Franc, and play with different percentages of each to create your own custom bottle. Finish the evening by making a label and putting a cork in it—each participant will go home with a bottle of their personal blend.

The evening will include light canapés prepared by ICC’s Chef-Insturctors.

Cost is all-inclusive and covers wines, tools, instruction and take-home bottle.