vinho verde tasting at icc

A Taste of Vinho Verde with Eric Entrikin, MS

Written by: Madison Cope, Intensive Sommelier Training Student

Map of Portugal indicating the Vinho Verde regionWhen most of us think of Portuguese wine, we think of the sweet, lush, and intense fortified wine called Port. But the world of Portuguese wine is so much more versatile and refreshing, as Eric Entrikin, Master Sommelier, explained at a lecture and tasting of Vinho Verde hosted at ICC’s California campus on May 22nd.

The region’s name, Vinho Verde, translating to “Green Wine,” truly captures the character of this region’s wines – light, crisp, and fresh like Portugal’s green and verdant countryside. Located in the northwestern corner of the country, Vinho Verde experiences a cool and rainy climate that is moderated by the Atlantic Ocean to the west. Home to complex valley systems and varying elevations, Vinho Verde boasts numerous microclimates that divide the appellation into nine sub-regions. And the predominantly granite soils lend a beautiful level of stony minerality to the finished wines.

 

 

Students smelling and tasting wine at the Vinho Verde tasting eventWhat makes Vinho Verde truly stand out, however, is the distinct qualities of the region’s grapes. Portugal is home to thousands of indigenous varieties (rivaled only by Italy in sheer number), and many of them are highlighted and celebrated in Vinho Verde’s wines. From Trajudura to Loureiro, these varieties are not on most of our tables – but they should be! At this guided tasting event, Eric Entrikin introduced us to some of these distinctive and alluring wines, and the common threads were evident – searing acidity, a light body, low alcohol, vibrant and fruity. These were truly palate-cleansing wines that left our mouths ready for the next bite!

Fun Fact: Eric Entrikin MS used a wine from Vinho Verde to swish with before taking the blind tasting portion of his master sommelier examination because of its high acid and unparalleled ability to cleanse the palate!

While many traditional Vinho Verde wines are blends of multiple white varieties, some single varietal Alvarinho and Loureiro do exist. Eric further explained the unique notes of each distinct variety. Bottles of White Wines from the Vinho Verde region of Portugal

  • Loureiro: Highly floral. Rose and freesia combine with ripe lemon citrus and tropical fruits. Juicy and refreshing with bright minerality.
  • Alvarinho (aka Albariño): The most intensely aromatic and floral of the common indigenous varieties. Orange peel, peach, toasted almond. Also the richest of Vinho Verde’s whites.
  • Avesso: Notes of orange and peach, toasted almond, citrus, apple, and pineapple. A slightly waxy texture is balanced by high acidity.
  • Azal: Green apple, lemon, lime with sharp acidity.
  • Arinto: Rich and flavorful. Citrus, apple, pear. One of the region’s highest quality grapes.
  • Trajadura: Delicate with notes of stone and tree fruit. This variety is the least acidic of the Vinho Verde varieties.

While Vinho Verde wines are not particularly complex, their simplicity yet firm structure make them highly drinkable and perfect “food wines.” So what do they drink well with? Eric suggests pairing Vinho Verde whites with salads, white fish, chicken, anything with citrus, or simply as an aperitif! For Vinho Verde reds, he suggests roasted and grilled meats and lamb. And for Rose, Eric recommends pairing with charcuterie, shell fish, and even Asian cuisine.

For those who love Riesling and Sauvignon Blanc, these wines are similar in profile and a great divergence from what you usually drink. What’s more, you will find high-quality Vinho Verde at very low prices, making them a great value and perfect for picnics during the spring and summer months. But don’t let these wines age, Eric warns, they are best drunk in their youth!

So with Memorial Day in the rearview mirror, go and pick up yourself a recent vintage from Vinho Verde that you (and your wallet) won’t mind sharing at your next summer barbeque. Saúde!

fci alumni ed hardi demo

6 Things to Know Before Opening Your Food Truck

Written by: Judson Kniffen, ICC’s Associate Director of Education

Ed Hardy explaining how to open a food truck to ICC students and alumniFCI graduate Ed Hardy, Class of ’06, recently returned to his Alma Matter to lead a business workshop and cooking demonstration for ICC students and alumni. Ed owns and operates the award-winning food truck, Bacon ‘n Ed’s Mobile Gourmet Kitchen, in the DC metro area. He specializes in private events where he features his famous fried chicken banh mi, Swedish meatball sub, and many other delicious items!

 

 

While discussing the business aspects Chef Natalia serving Bacon n Ed's demo samplesof owning and operating a food truck, Ed and his chef-partner Evan Henris demonstrated how to make quick pickles for their celebrated Banh Mi sandwiches, and they discussed the multi-week long process for making real sauerkraut. Fermentation is hot right now, and Chef Ed works hard to stay on top of the food trends.

 

 

 

Thinking of opening your own food truck? Here are the 6 key lessons we learned from Ed Hardy:

1. Focus on a concept.

Really think about your menu, and whom your audience is. Is your food able to be prepared and served in a truck? What practical necessities will you need to serve the most amount of people in the shortest amount of time?

2. Chose your vehicle wisely.

Airstreams look cool, but those curved corners are big wastes of space. Think about maximizing every square inch of your food truck. What is the flow of the cooking and serving? Is there enough storage for food and cleaning supplies?

3. Systems equal success.

Gey your systems in place before opening: payment, scheduling, cleaning, organizing.

4. Start your paperwork early.

There is a lot of licensing, tax forms and other paperwork that need to be submitted. It’s not the fun part of the job, but it’s an unavoidable reality.

5. Be present on social media.

Let your followers know where you will be and keep them engaged. Respond to all question and comments just as you would in person.

6. Be unique

Competition is fierce these days. Your truck and your food need to stand out. Invest in good graphic design and be creative, and consistent, with your brand image. Maintain your quality — don’t lower your standards to increase margins, customers will notice.

Business Bites: Launching Your Food Product, spoon and light bulb

Business Bites: Launching Your Food Product

The BUSINESS BITES SERIES, brought to you by the Culinary Entrepreneurship program at ICC, is a series of workshops, discussion panels and networking events designed to support entrepreneurs in the food industry. Each event is designed to provide education, information and the opportunity to connect with industry experts in a collaborative setting.

BUSINESS BITES: LAUNCHING YOUR FOOD PRODUCT

FROM STOVE TO STORE AND EVERYTHING IN BETWEEN

Thursday, June 21st | 6:30-8:00pm
International Culinary Center
462 Broadway, 2nd Floor Theater

Turning an idea for a food or beverage product into reality is a dream for many, but it takes more than a delicious product and eye-catching packaging to bring your product to the shelves. From testing your concept and researching competitors, to manufacturing, packaging and distribution, entrepreneurs face many unique challenges in today’s competitive food product space.

So what do you need to know to take your idea from stove to store?

Join us for an informative discussion with experts in entrepreneurship, branding, financing and retail to help get your food product off the ground. Our panel of business owners, brand consultants, and specialty buyers will share tips and tricks about where to start; branding, design & packaging; shared commercial kitchens & co-packers; sales & distribution strategies; and what everyone wants to know – what buyers are looking for! You’ll also have ample time for networking and the opportunity to learn how ICC’s Culinary Entrepreneurship program can take you from concept to business plan & pitch in just 6-weeks!

Plus, learn more about the Stacy’s Scholarship for Female Culinary Leaders, a full-tuition scholarship to ICC’s Culinary Entrepreneurship program for women who have plans to open a culinary business!

MODERATOR

Alek Marfisi, Upwind Strategies
Alek Marfisi – Owner, Upwind Strategies & ICC Entrepreneurship Instructor

Alek Marfisi is a native New Yorker with a passion for building things and helping people. After working advising small businesses for five years, Alek launched Upwind Strategies in 2015 with the mission of providing deeper and more relatable services to small businesses: the anti-business-school services firm. He previously worked with the NYS Small Business Development Center where he dove into the exciting intricacies of making entrepreneurial projects a reality. Since then, Alek has logged more than 11,000 hours working with small businesses and has been recognized as one of the top drivers of economic development in the country.

PANELISTS

Liz Alpern, Owner of The Gefilteria, Business Bites panelist
Liz Alpern – Owner, The Gefilteria

Liz Alpern is the owner of The Gefilteria and co-author of The Gefilte Manifesto. She is on the faculty of ICC’s Culinary Entrepreneurship program and is a consultant for national non-profit, Fair Food Network.

Follow Liz: Instagram @lizalpern @queersoupnight
Follow The Gefilteria: Facebook, Instagram & Twitter @gefilteria

Jill Frechtman, Brand Consultant, Business Bites Panelist
Jill Frechtman – Brand Consultant

Jill Frechtman is an entrepreneur with a passion for building inspired, authentic, and impactful brands. Jill’s unique approach to branding incorporates her 16+ years of experience as a designer, specialty food entrepreneur, and a creative strategy and brand marketing consultant. She is the founder of chocolate pretzel company, Fretzels by Jill, and is a consultant for a number of other entrepreneurs and businesses, in a variety of industries, developing, designing, and growing their brands.

Laura Heifetz, Grocery Buyer, Greene Grape, Business Bites Panelist
Laura Heifetz – Grocery Buyer, The Greene Grape

Laura Heifetz is a native New Yorker with a love of all things edible. She attended the Natural Gourmet Institute and worked as a personal chef, before discovering her passion for cheese and specialty foods. Having worked behind some of NYC’s most famous cheese counters for 5 years, she took over as Grocery Buyer in 2014 at the Greene Grape, where she keeps the shelves stocked with some of the world’s best foods. She regularly works with local small batch producers to help develop their products from concept to shelf.

Follow Laura: Instagram @cheflaura126 | Twitter @curdbird
Follow The Greene Grape: Facebook @thegreenegrape | Instagram & Twitter @greenegrape

April Wachtel, Owner of Swig + Swallow, Business Bites Panelist
April Wachtel – Founder/CEO, Swig + Swallow

April Wachtel is a passionate educator, an experienced mixologist, a cocktail and spirits instructor, and founder of Swig + Swallow, the cocktail mixer company. She is a 22 year veteran in the beverage and hospitality industry, working in every role from busser to bartender to beverage director, to brand ambassador to beverage consultant. April has appeared on The Today Show, and Fox & Friends, as well as The Pitch Podcast, The Travel Bite, Tech Bites, The Main Course, Sharp & Hot, and more.

Follow April: Instagram @aprilwachtel
Follow Swig + Swallow: Facebook & Instagram @swigandswallow | Twitter: @swig_swallow

Alumni Spotlight: Katie Friedman

Katie Friedman | Professional Pastry Arts 2016

I have been a pastry enthusiast for as long as I can remember. When I look back at old notebooks and photo albums, nearly every account of trips and vacations was centered on food. I was lucky enough to travel to Europe several times as a teenager, and I have countless photos of Parisian patisserie cases crammed full of cream-filled wonders, stacks of baguettes, éclairs of all colors lined up waiting to be devoured.

Once a year for my birthday growing up, my parents, recognizing this love of mine, would take me to my favorite restaurant. It was called the Bittersweet, and was renowned locally for its creative plating full of colors, shapes, and textures. As sugar fiend to the core, I would wait, fidgeting with anxious anticipation until the dinner plates were finally cleared and it was time for dessert. Somehow, it had become a tradition for me to be allowed to stand inconspicuously in a corner of the impossibly small kitchen and gaze in awe at the pastry chefs as they skillfully constructed works of edible art. I remember being too enthralled to even move as I watched their hands carefully balance a thin arc of an almond cookie on a scoop of gelato or deftly drizzle a bit of raspberry sauce around the rim of a plate.

As sometimes happens with childhood career dreams, while my love of creating (and consuming) dessert never waned, logistics of life crept in and my dream of being a pastry chef took a backseat. Initially, I decided to go the more “practical” route by attending a traditional college. At the time, I was not yet confident enough to do the thing I loved most. After graduating from Scripps College in 2006, I moved to Oakland to join an organization called Teach for America. During the day, I worked with students with special needs and at night I pursued my Masters Degree in Education at San Francisco State. I then moved across the country and continued teaching in Manhattan for several more years. I loved being a teacher–however, while I was comfortable in the classroom, there was something missing, and I looked back to what had always drawn me – Pastry! I realized that every dollar I saved was being spent at new, interesting restaurants. I had also started to obsessively read pastry blogs and binge on chef shows. That was when I started browsing culinary opportunities in upstate New York. Suddenly, a whole different world seemed within my reach.

In 2012, I decided to pursue a career change and jumped headfirst into the hospitality industry. Starting at a family-run dairy and bed and breakfast in Hudson, New York, I quickly adapted to a daily routine of baking for guests. It was a small operation and they felt confident that I could produce high quality food for their establishment; seeing their enthusiasm was extremely rewarding. Equally satisfying was being so closely tied to the ingredients that my hands transformed into steaming plum galettes or scones with fresh cream, berries, and homemade lemon curd. We often received paper bags of freshly milled flour from our neighbors and hastened to turn it into breads and cakes. I was able to see firsthand what “farm to table” really meant; ever since then, this concept became an important aspect of baking for me.

During this time, I flourished doing what has always inspired me. With positive feedback and encouragement from my employers, I was eager to try new dishes, experiment with flavor combinations, and pore over baking blogs and cookbooks in my spare time. I realized that although I had spent most of my professional life as a teacher, I was finally doing something that sustained me on multiple levels.

Pastry Students, Pastry School, Pastry Chef

Knowing I needed to elevate my pastry skills, I returned to California to enroll at ICC. I had looked at other schools, but ICC’s approachable chef instructors, its physical proximity to so many amazing bakeries and restaurants, and it’s gleaming, happily buzzing classrooms convinced me that this was the place I wanted to be. It paid off—attending ICC was one of the best things I’ve ever done. My class of nine women bonded immediately, and despite every class’s ups and downs, we became a cohesive team supporting each other to the finish line.

One of my favorite memories was when my benchmate, who was very known to all of us for being extremely clean and orderly even in the messiest of situations, over enthusiastically stirred her spatula while tempering chocolate and stood there stunned as she realized she too was covered in chocolate like the rest of us. Another favorite time was during the weekends we all trucked in to work on our gingerbread replica of the Winchester Mystery House to display at school over the holidays.

When finals inevitably came and went, it was bittersweet. I graduated with honors while simultaneously working at Fleur de Cocoa, a family-run patisserie in Los Gatos, where I remained for three years. After graduation, I took on a second job as a pastry production team member at Manresa Bread. Working two jobs, often doubling up on 8-hour shifts in the same day, was exhausting and pushed me to the limits. However, the experience, camaraderie, and encouragement I received from my supervisors and co-workers kept me going. Upon reflection, I greatly value Manresa’s dedication to doing everything by hand, using organic produce and dairy from local farmers, and experimenting with different kinds of grains until the perfect product was achieved.

Looking back, I can see that pastry school gave me extremely necessary foundational knowledge, but working in higher volume businesses taught me confidence, efficiency, speed, and understanding of how to be part of a team working towards a common goal. Although I loved working in the professional bakery setting, I jumped at the chance when ICC offered me a position as assistant to the Chef Instructors! It was the perfect opportunity to blend my background in education and passion for pastry arts.

Throughout the duration of this job, I happily spent my days working with students to master the classic French pastry curriculum. It felt really good to be in a position where I was both taking some of the stress off of instructors whom I highly respected from my own schooling, and giving back in some small way towards the school that introduced me to an industry about which I feel so passionately.

Towards the end of my position with ICC, an employer reached out to the school looking for a summer stagiaire in a small southwestern French village. The position entailed getting flour from the local mills, making croissants and baguettes every day by hand, living and working in a village with a population of only 500 people, exploring the local history and architecture on days off, and working in a beautiful building that was constructed in the 1200’s. Reading that job description brought back happy images of patisserie windows from my childhood and, holding my breath, I sent off an application.

I was beyond thrilled when I received a job offer the following week. The process of applying to this job is another reinforcement to me that, if you pursue what you love wholeheartedly, you will create the opportunities you have always dreamed of receiving. I hope to deepen my knowledge of traditional French pastries in the very place they were first tested and developed. In addition, part of the position includes the time and space to do my own recipe development in the patisserie, and I hope to bring ideas of non-traditional flavor combinations or pastry ideas with me that may not otherwise be showcased in the village. In the few months before departure, I plan to study French, compile favorite recipes I have collected along the way, and leave with an open mind to what doors may open next.

Follow me in my adventures in France on Instagram: @katyfree8

ICC Sommelier Alumna, Minjoo Kim

Alumni Spotlight: Advanced Sommelier, Minjoo Kim

Minjoo Kim, Advanced Sommelier, began her foray into food and wine training to become a chef and received her Culinary Arts Diploma from Le Cordon Bleu in Sydney, Australia. It was during her time as a culinary apprentice that she realized her passion for wine and sought to further her education at the International Culinary Center in New York, enrolling in the Intensive Sommelier Training program. In 2013, after passing the Court of Master Sommeliers Introductory and Certified Sommelier Exams at ICC, she returned to Korea to begin her wine career. Over the years Minjoo has worked as both Manager and Chief Sommelier for Hannam Liquor, retail shop and wine bar, as well as a tasting educator for the International Food and Wine Society, and Judge of the Korea Sommelier Wine Awards and Korean Wine Fair. In 2017 she passed the Court of Master Sommeliers Advanced Sommelier Exam.


What was your first (or most fond) memory of wine to date?

A glass of Vouvray, Huet ‘Le Haut Lieu’ demi-sec.


When did you know that studying wine would be a passion you’d like to pursue professionally?

While I was studying at ICC, the Master Sommeliers inspired me to believe that one day I could possibly do this like them.They were amazing.


Your extensive range of culinary and wine education ranges from a Culinary Art Diploma from Le Cordon Bleu’s Sydney, Australia campus as well as ICC’s Intensive Sommelier Training program in 2013 and more. What made you decide to move forward with a wine career over a more traditional culinary path?

I learned that wine could be more than just an alcoholic beverage when I visited Sydney’s fascinating restaurant Sepia—two hats ranked ay that time—to try a pairing menu for study as a culinary apprentice. Before that I wasn’t very fond of alcoholic beverages and simply hated drinking. But that night I was overwhelmed and began noticing that wines could be just more than alcoholic beverage. It was at that moment that I decided to learn about wines. That is what brought me to New York City and ICC right after finishing my 2 and a half year culinary path. I believe that knowing and understanding wine broadens my culinary horizon.


You recently received your AS [Advanced Sommelier] certification. [Congratulations!] What was the most difficult hurdle you faced prior to achieving this status?

I actually didn’t receive my certification the first time I took the Advanced Sommelier exam, despite passing the Theory and Blind Tasting portions. With only have 5 years of experience as a sommelier and having never worked for any formal, fine dining restaurants, I believe it was my minimal service experience that was the biggest reason I didn’t pass the exam. But I can tell you that I definitely learned a lot from that failure. Last year, I retook the Advanced Sommelier exam and passed my second time around!


What has been the most rewarding experience thus far in your wine career?

For the past three years I had been working as both a manager in a retail wine shop and chief sommelier for a wine bar at  the same time and place up until very recently. During this time, it was difficult to balance my roles in both sections. But it provided me with experience and communication skills for both wine retail and service, as well as the opportunity to try many interesting promotions, events and educational classes. It was a lot of fun and I learned a lot!


Your extensive background in wine has landed you as a judge in 2017 for both the Korea Sommelier Wine Awards and the KWC (Korean Wine Fair.) Through these particular experiences and beyond, do you feel that mentorship plays an important role for those looking to develop a career in the field? If so, why?

I think that mentorship is a crucial part of this industry. I see many people who have mentors easily approach their goals and achieve what they are trying to go after. It’s important for those just entering the wine world to have mentors like I did. At the very beginning, I was struggling with no one to discuss matters I encountered like big career path decisions, preparing for competitions and the Advanced Sommelier exam, etc. I still hope I can find someone to seek help and advice from, but I also want to be the someone who can help future sommeliers.


If you weren’t a professional sommelier or chef, what career path would you have gone down?

I’ve always aspired to find beautiful things in my life such as food and wine. My major in University was Fashion, so I’m guessing I would have worked vigorously in any fashion business with a beautiful glass of wine!


For any new individuals looking to make their mark on the world of wine, please share your advice for a flourishing wine career?

Have passion and be full of energy. With that combination, you can make any mark you wish. I learned this from five of the Master Sommeliers I met while taking the program at ICC.


What are your professional goals for the next few years? Any exciting news on the horizon to share?

I definitely want to take the Master Sommelier exam in the next few years and want to do anything I can here to help the wine industry in Korea grow. Without growth in this industry, there is no dream for us Sommeliers.


 

Cooking With Valrhona Chocolate: Salted Double Chocolate Chip Cookies

ICC’s Director of Pastry Arts, Chef Jansen Chan recreates a recipe from former Cookie Games participant and ICC graduate, Stephanie Rodriguez, Pastry Arts Class of 2016 using Valrhona Chocolate.

Enjoy the following video and make these delicious treats at home using the recipe below.

Salted Double Chocolate Cookies

By: Stephanie Rodriguez

Country of Inspiration: United States of America

Yield: 4 dozen cookies

Ingredients for dough:

5.3 oz/150 g. – butter, unsalted

1 ¼ cup / 8.75 oz   – brown sugar

1 cup / 7 oz – granulated sugar

3 eggs

1 teaspoon vanilla extract

3.5 oz/100 g. glucose syrup

2 ¾ cup + 2 T. / 14.375 oz. bread flour

½ cup / 1.5 oz.  cocoa powder, Dutch-processed

1 teaspoon  baking soda

1 teaspoonsalt, kosher

3.6 oz./100 g. chocolate feves

Coarse sea salt, for garnish, as needed.

Procedure:

In a tabletop mixer fitted with a paddle attachment, cream the butter and both sugars, until light and fluffy. Gradually, add the eggs, vanilla, and glucose syrup, scraping the sides of the bowl well. In a separate bowl, mix together the flour, cocoa powder, baking soda and salt. Add the dry ingredients in one addition and combine at low speed until just mixed. Add the chocolate chips and mix until combined. Remove the dough, wrap in plastic wrap and chill until firm. Let rest at least one hour. Preheat the oven to 350°F. Portion the dough into 48 pieces and roll into balls. Place each portion onto a parchment-lined baking sheet, providing 1 ½” between each cookie, and flatten.  Top with a pinch of sea salt and bake for 7-10 minutes or until firm to the touch. Allow the cookies to cool before transferring. Store well wrapped for 3-4 days.

ICC Alumnus David Israelow competing in the Washoku World Challenge

Alumni Spotlight: David Israelow

David Israelow is a market analyst turned chef.  He is a graduate of the International Culinary Center and the Tokyo Sushi academy.  David has cooked and trained in New York City, Colorado, India and Japan.  He recently won the World Washoku Challenge, hosted in Tokyo.  Currently, David is working on food and farm related projects in the Hudson Valley and New York City.  

What motivated you to enroll in the Professional Culinary Arts program after working in financial industry for some time?

When I was working in finance, I got to the point where I was ready to move on, but wasn’t sure in what direction.  I looked around for a new job but didn’t find anything that interested me.  I decided instead to enroll at ICC in the evening program.


What did you enjoy learning the most while enrolled in culinary school?

French technique is the reason I enrolled in culinary school.  I really enjoyed learning the foundations from knife work to sauce making to potatoes, veg, proteins, etc.


Tell us a little bit about your first culinary job after graduating from ICC.

While I was finishing at ICC I started interning at ABC Kitchen and then at En Japanese Brasserie.  After graduating, I had a chance to travel, so I ended up in India for 6 months.  When I returned, I wanted to work in fine dining and spent time trailing and volunteering around NYC before starting at Betony.  I spent about a year there.  It was a very demanding kitchen and environment but I learned a lot.


We know that you served as a volunteer to Chef Hiroko Shimbo’s 5-day Essentials of Japanese Cuisine course at ICC. When did you realize were you inspired by Japanese cuisine and which aspect of the cuisine were you attracted to the most?

I have always been interested in Japanese cuisine.  There aren’t many structured programs to study Japanese technique, so when I saw the opportunity to assist Hiroko’s class as a student I was very excited.  I actually assisted her twice for essentials and once for ramen and gyoza.


How did working at American and French restaurants help your understanding of Japanese cuisine?

Many American restaurants are founded in French systems and techniques that were explicitly codified and widely adopted.  So working in American restaurants its easy to learn a lot of French technique and vocabulary without even realizing it.  This is not necessarily the case with Japanese cuisine.  Often Japanese vocabulary is borrowed to describe American food that has little to no foundation in Japanese technique.

On the other side of the coin, there are some American restaurants with deep knowledge of Japanese cuisine doing really incredible work developing new methods founded in technique and tradition.  But I don’t think it’s very common.


Tell us a little about your experience heading to Japan and enrolling in a Japanese cooking school.

I went to Japan with no plan, no contacts and no idea what I was doing.  I was lucky to make some amazing contacts and was able to stagiaire in several kitchens, travel widely and eat amazing food.

When I found out about the program offered in English at the Tokyo Sushi Academy, I decided to enroll.  I saw it as an opportunity to round out the experiences I had in kitchens that weren’t always easy to understand or readily translatable.  It was a great curriculum at the TSA with dedicated and skillful instructors, I was able to learn a lot very quickly.


While in Japan, did you acquire any apprenticeships? If so, please share your favorite experience.

In Japan I’ve trained in restaurants in Tokyo, Kyoto and Osaka.  I wouldn’t go as far as to say I had a favorite experience, but preparing osechi ryori (Japanese new year food) in Osaka was certainly a highlight.  On the final day, all of the cooks spent 24 hours straight finishing all of the jubako (boxes holding the new year food).


Would you recommend that chefs should study Japanese cuisine, even if they are not working full-time with the country’s cuisine?

Japanese cuisine is founded in technique and tradition.  Traditional Japanese cuisine, Washoku, has been designated UNESCO intangible cultural heritage.  I think it is certainly worthwhile topic of study for any aspiring cook, chef or food related endeavors.



How has life changed after receiving first prize at the Washoku World Competition? Have there been any exciting, new opportunities popping up?

A lot of very interesting opportunities have begun to unfold following the WWC.  I met some amazing people and expanded my network both in and outside of Japan during the competition.  I look forward to seeing what presents itself.


Aside from the Washoku World Competition, what other goals do you seek to achieve in the upcoming months/years within your career?

I’m currently working on some projects in the Hudson Valley and New York City.  I plan to learn more about farming and to continue my culinary training in Japan.

 

Cookie Games Sixth Annual Competition 2018

The Cookie Games 2018

The sixth annual school-wide Cooke Games Competition returns to the International Culinary Center in New York on Friday, May 11th from 3:30-5:30pm. Follow us for coverage of this year’s games!
Friday, May 11th | 3:30-5:30pm
International Culinary Center
462 Broadway, 2nd Floor Amphitheater

The Cookie Games was developed to challenge current ICC students to create an original cookie recipe inspired by a country of their choice. This year, 23 teams of one or two submitted a name and recipe for their cookie concept inspired by a country of origin. An in-house committee selected 10 finalist teams to produce their cookies for a high-profile judging panel at the annual competition. The 2018 judge’s panel will feature Allison Kave (Co-owner of Butter & Scotch), Stephanie Prida (Pastry Chef of The Grill, The Pool, and Lobster Club), Mark Iacono (Owner of Lucali), Craig Koketsu (Corporate Chef of Quality Branded Restaurant Group) and Anna Bolz (Pastry Chef at Per Se).

The cookies will be evaluated on creativity, execution, and taste. The judges will award first, second and third place winners. In addition, all audience and press attendees at the ceremony will have a chance to try each of the eligible cookies and vote for a Fan Favorite!

2018 WINNERS WILL RECEIVE:

1st Place – KENWOOD Chef Major Kitchen Machine, TILIT Chef Backpack & Apron, REMARQUE CREATIVE Custom Recipe Video Shoot, VALRHONA Inspiration Chocolates

2nd Place – BRAUN MultiQuick 9 Hand blender, TILIT Chef Coat & Apron

3rd Place – BRAUN MultiQuick 7 Hand blender, TILIT Chef Apron

Fan Favorite –TILIT Chef Apron, The Pastry Chef’s Little Black Book by: Michael Mignano & Michael Zebrowski

Each year students deliver a wide assortment of international concepts such as Duck Fat Cookies (France), Rosy Taro Cookie (China) and Mole Cookie (Mexico). Winning entries have included: Dulcetto Bar (Russia) by Bojena Linton (2013), Coconut Daun Pandan (Malaysia) by Vianna Sinnan (2014) and Chocolate Cardamom Button (India) by Savita Bhat (2015).

2018 COMPETITORS:

BOURBON CITRUS BARS
USA | Emma Lanier

FORMOSA
Taiwan | Earl Yin-Wei Liao

SALTED BUTTER & BUCKWHEAT LAYER COOKIES
France | Beth Sall

GUAVA JELLY
Dominican Republic | Evelyn Cooke

MITARASHI KUKKI
Japan | Jessie Yuchen Tsai & Stephen Quackenbush

TARO COCONUT COOKIE
Jamaica | Yedenny Matos

SUMMER BUTTER COOKIE
Mexico | Thomas Gallagher

RICH PINEAPPLE
Indonesia | Richard Leonardo

SEABUCK THORN & SUMAK SNAP
Denmark | Sharof Rashidov

UMAMI COOKIE
Japan | Rebecca Ng

Get ready for the games! Check out highlights from last year’s Cookie Games competition here.
In the mood for cookies? Try this Salted Double Chocolate Chip Cookies recipe from last year’s Cookie Games, featuring Valrhona chocolate.

SPONSORED BY:

Premier Sponsor

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Sponsors

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Remarque Creative Logo
Braun Logo
Valrhona Chocolate Logo
Rishi Tea & Botanicals logo
Michel et Augustin logo
NYC Summer of Savings, Pastry student decorating sea themed wedding cake

ICC’s Summer of Savings Announced!

SPECIAL SUMMER PRICING & SCHOLARSHIPS AVAILABLE

Ready to turn up the heat on your culinary or pastry technique this June?

We’re excited to announce our Summer of Savings with brand NEW scholarship opportunities to bring you even more savings towards your education! Begin in ICC’s Professional Culinary Arts or Professional Pastry Arts programs this June (July as well for Pastry) to receive our Special Summer pricing. Plus, for the first time ever, we’re offering 4 new scholarships with awards ranging from $15,000-$25,000.

Did you know, based on your FAFSA, if you’re eligible for the maximum amount in Federal Grants, the $25,000 ICC Grand Culinary Scholarship could cover the remaining costs of the Professional Culinary Arts June evening programs? Same goes for the $25,000 ICC Grand Pastry Scholarship and the June & July Pastry Arts programs! This means you could pursue your culinary or pastry dreams this summer with NO out-of-pocket expenses for your education!

Check out all the ways you can save this summer and submit your application today!

Professional Culinary Arts
Click here for program details.
Daytime – M-F – 6 Months
9:30 am to 3:00 pm
06/11/2018 – 11/28/2018 – $35,900 (normally $39,900)
Evening- M-F – 6 Months
5:00 pm to 10:00 pm
06/11/2018 – 12/04/2018 – $29,900 (normally $32,500)
Evening- M,W,F – 9 Months
5:45 pm to 10:45 pm
06/11/2018 – 04/03/2019 – $29,900 (normally $34,900)
Evening- T,Th,Sat – 9 Months
5:45 pm to 10:45 pm (tues & thurs) & 9:00 am to 2:00 pm (sat)
06/07/2018 – 02/28/2019 – $29,900 (normally $32,500)
Professional Pastry Arts
Click here for program details.
Evening- M,W,F – 9 Months
5:30 pm to 10:30 pm
06/04/2018 – 03/29/2019 – $29,900 (normally $34,900)
Evening- T,Th,Sat – 9 Months
5:45 pm to 10:45 pm (tues & thurs) & 9:00 am to 2:00 pm (sat)
07/07/2018 – 04/25/2019 – $29,900 (normally $32,900)

AVAILABLE SUMMER SCHOLARSHIPS

ICC Grand Culinary Arts Scholarship, $25,000, Student cooking eggs at station
ICC GRAND CULINARY SCHOLARSHIP – $25,000

Financial need is a criterion for this scholarship. Applicants must complete a FAFSA.

AWARD AMOUNT: $25,000

ELIGIBLE CLASSES
Must be enrolled in one of the following PROFESSIONAL CULINARY ARTS programs:

  • June 7, 2018 (Tues & Thurs Eve, Sat Day)
  • June 11, 2018 (Mon-Fri Day)
  • June 11, 2018 (Mon-Fri Eve)
  • June 11, 2018 (Mon, Wed, Fri Eve)

APPLICATION DEADLINE:
May 25, 2018

AWARD DATE:
June 1, 2018

Click here for eligibility requirements and application details.

ICC $15,000 Culinary Scholarship, Student peeling apples
ICC $15,000 CULINARY SCHOLARSHIP – $15,000

Financial need is a criterion for this scholarship. Applicants must complete a FAFSA.

AWARD AMOUNT: $15,000

ELIGIBLE CLASSES
Must be enrolled in one of the following PROFESSIONAL CULINARY ARTS programs:

  • June 7, 2018 (Tues & Thurs Eve, Sat Day)
  • June 11, 2018 (Mon-Fri Day)
  • June 11, 2018 (Mon-Fri Eve)
  • June 11, 2018 (Mon, Wed, Fri Eve)

APPLICATION DEADLINE:
May 25, 2018

AWARD DATE:
June 1, 2018

Click here for eligibility requirements and application details.

ICC Grand Pastry Arts Scholarship, $25,000, Student decorating white wedding cake
ICC GRAND PASTRY SCHOLARSHIP – $25,000

Financial need is a criterion for this scholarship. Applicants must complete a FAFSA.

AWARD AMOUNT: $25,000

ELIGIBLE CLASSES
Must be enrolled in one of the following PROFESSIONAL PASTRY ARTS programs:

  • June 4, 2018 (Mon, Wed, Fri Eve)

 

APPLICATION DEADLINE:
May 25, 2018

AWARD DATE:
June 1, 2018

Click here for eligibility requirements and application details.

ICC $15,000 PASTRY SCHOLARSHIP – $15,000

Financial need is a criterion for this scholarship. Applicants must complete a FAFSA.

AWARD AMOUNT: $15,000

ELIGIBLE CLASSES
Must be enrolled in one of the following PROFESSIONAL PASTRY ARTS programs:

  • July 7, 2018 (Tues & Thurs Eve, Sat Day)

 

APPLICATION DEADLINE:
June 25, 2018

AWARD DATE:
July 2, 2018

Click here for eligibility requirements and application details.