Previous years villages have been hosted at Bloomingdales, Vanity Fair and more.

ICC Partners with MOFAD for 2016 Gingerbread Village Display

The International Culinary Center® will launch their 2016 holiday gingerbread village for an exclusive display at the Museum of Food and Drink. This year’s village, created by ICC Director of Pastry Arts Jansen Chan and student volunteers from the Professional Pastry Arts program, will pay tribute to the historic melting pot of all immigrants in the United States. Beginning Friday, December 9 through Saturday, December 31 (between the hours of 12pm and 6pm) the village will be on display to the public attendees of MOFAD.

Illustrating the common act of breaking bread throughout various communities, seven different gingerbread bakeries will each represent the delicious contributions of immigrants from across the globe. Steamed buns, conchas, flatbread, pretzels, injera, challah, baguettes and croissants will each be showcased throughout the gingerbread village to highlight different nations. A bridge of gingerbread men will unite each island over a sea of fortune cookies – a nod to another delectable immigrant creation, and lead to the main gingerbread bakery representing the United States.

Through the collaboration, attendees will have the exclusivity of experiencing New York City’s only location to enjoy gingerbread-flavored fortune cookies – made directly on site at the Museum of Food and Drink.

I’m excited to work with MOFAD to display our Professional Pastry Arts students’ work. It is the perfect location to see how food celebrates our traditions and allows us to share the experience with one another. As always, our gingerbread displays are catered to their homes, and this year we are happy to supplement MOFAD’s study in immigrant food contributions.”
Jansen Chan, Director of Pastry Arts at the International Culinary Center®

MOFAD and ICC both share a passion for education and food culture. We are thrilled to partner with ICC to spread holiday cheer and celebrate immigrant contributions to American food culture.”
Peter Kim, Executive Director, Museum of Food and Drink

 

MOFAD is located at 62 Bayard Street, Brooklyn, NY 11222

For ICC media inquiries, contact: Angela Samartano asamartano@culinarycenter.com
For MOFAD media inquiries, contact: Jen Neugeboren jen@hannaleecommunications.com 

dsc_01151

Library Notes: New Books for November 2016

Written by: Kate Heenan
ICC Library Intern

dsc_00561Adventures of Fat Rice

Fans of restaurant cook books and graphic novels alike, check out our new book The Adventures of Fat Rice.  Conlon, Lo and Amano put together some of the favorite recipes from the Chicago restaurant, Fat Rice, with a focus on Macanese food.  The book itself is put together like an omnibus of a comic series.  The chapters include 100 recipes spanning from pickles and preserves and appetizers to desserts with a helpful building blocks chapter included at the end. Each chapter not only offers up some great recipes or “adventures”, but incredible graphics, photographs and theories about etymology and origin of the dishes included.  Be sure to check out all the adventures The Adventures of Fat Rice has to offer from the Asparagus Invasion to Attack of the Chili Clam.

dsc_00431Ferment, Pickle, Dry

Ferment, Pickle, Dry: Ancient Methods, Modern Meals by Simon Poffley and Gaba Smolinksa-Poffley offers a simple and exciting guide book for preserving enthusiast.  The book includes an introduction to the ancient methods of fermenting, pickling, and drying food along with reasons why they are not just a passing fad.  Recipes included are not only staples, including basic kombucha recipes, but new and clever creations such as a sour grape pickle-tini. Included are dual recipes, where everything can be incorporated into main dishes, making sure that no jar remains unused.

DALI: Les Diners de Gala

Fans of the painter Salvador Dali will be excited to know that Dali: Les Diners de Gala has finally been republished! One glance at the cover lets a reader know they are going on a surreal culinary adventure; one that only Dali, himself, could have created. The book includes all of the original 136 recipes, plus bizarre and genius artistic renderings by Dali.  Recipes span from exotic dishes to meals to aphrodisiacs.  To quote Dali himself, “Les dîners de Gala is uniquely devoted to the pleasures of taste … If you are a disciple of one of those calorie-counters who turn the joys of eating into a form of punishment, close this book at once; it is too lively, too aggressive, and far too impertinent for you.”


dsc_00821The Chef’s Library

Ever wonder what your favorite Chef’s favorite cookbook is?  Well wonder no more.  Jenny Linford’s The Chef’s Library: Favorite Cookbooks from the World’s Great Kitchens does just that.  Linford interviews over 70 Chefs explaining why and what they love about their pick from Darina Allen talking about The Ballymaloe Cookbook to Michael Wignall ‘s explain how the story is also important in his pick, Origin.  Chapter 2 includes over 50 of the most influential cookbooks ever written with a brief history of the Chef and book included.  Her last chapter is a Cookbook Directory organized by Country, time and specialty.  Be sure to see if you favorite stacks up!

The Science of Wine

Jamie Goode, a widely respected authority on wine science, just came out with his second edition for The Science of Wine: From Vine to Glass.  This edition includes everything we loved about the first edition’s groundbreaking reference giving information about the science of wine, ecological impacts on the future of wine making, and new technological trends.  The new edition includes a new chapter on soils and vines, oxygen management, and a linguist view for describing wine.  It also includes hot topics that the last edition wasn’t able to include such as genetically modified grapevines, the future of the cork, and more.

These and many more can be found in the “New Books” display in the ICC library! Follow @IntlCulLibrary on Twitter and Instagram for more updates.

dsc_00931

butterandscotch-2

How To Write A Cookbook Series: Butter & Scotch

At Brooklyn’s Butter & Scotch, everything is made by hand, and seasonal, inventive flavors are created to satisfy any sweet tooth—especially those with a penchant for spirits. In their namesake cookbook, Allison Kave and Keavy Landreth dish up more than 75 recipes for incredible desserts, cocktails, and creations that shake up the traditional approach to booze and sweets.

Come meet the ladies and learn about their experience creating a cookbook based on the beloved bar on Thursday, December 15 from 3:30pm through 5pm in the ICC Amphitheatre

To RSVP, or for questions, contact Sara Quiroz at: squiroz@culinarycenter.com

For future events visit the events calendar on the ICC Community Page at  my.InternationalCulinaryCenter.com.

butterscotch22288j3_29_book-cover

wine

Student Life: Beginning the Intensive Sommelier Training Program

I started the Intensive Sommelier Training program on Monday. It’s now only Tuesday and my head is SPINNING. Learning wine is daunting. You need to remember that you can’t expect to know everything (at least in a day!) and it’s nearly impossible to have tried every wine available. It’s like film, in that you will probably never see every single movie ever created.

I certainly didn’t come in “cold” as I’ve been working as a wine clerk in a boutique wine shop for four years now. The shop wine experience has been great, the owner, values our opinions in the buying process so we taste everything and debate it coming in, he has supplemented my Intermediate Certification through the WSET and he charges us cost on our take home bottles. It’s been a great recipe for gaining hands on spit bucket experience, but is it a career?

jared-screenshotGreat wine knowledge can open the doors to opportunities working in retail beyond a clerk position. I could move on to a store that needs managers, or could work for a larger retailer that uses buyers. Or even transition to the distribution side and begin representing wine portfolios to stores and restaurants. Will I stay with retail after getting that pin? IF I get that pin?

This is a real study and the last thing I should do is get too cocky just because I happen to know what Tokaji is. [Our instructor] Scott stressed HUMILITY in his first lecture on Monday night. If the current 200-something individuals who have achieved the Master Sommelier level can accept the concept of humility, I think I can too.

Despite my head start, I am nowhere near where I need to be yet to become a Certified Sommelier. I am familiar with a different tasting method, which I’m going to have to unlearn to some extent. I am going to have to learn to slow down and deductively ascertain varietals and regions. I am woefully unkempt in appearance, coming from the more relaxed hardwood floors of hand sales rather than the more refined manner of dress seen throughout high end restaurants and expected for class. I feel like Jed Freakin’ Clampett over here!

My study skills are weak. I managed to read the material for the first class and get my notes taken, but my head and focus are so addled that it took me all day to get through it. In any case, despite what some might think, this is rigorous joyful labor and definitely not a dalliance into a hobby. Not at this level. I am ready to become a Certified Sommelier, but my head? Still spinning!

ava-pastry-class

Student Life: The Transition From Biology to Baking

I fell in love with baking at a very young age. My homemaker mom loves to bake, and so I would always be right by her side learning by osmosis. It was fun not only eating a yummy homemade dessert but also getting to spend some quality time with her. 

ava3The thought of going to pastry school was far from my mind so after I graduated high school, I went off to college with a love for science and laboratory research and majored in biology. Along with biology classes, but I also had to take other science classes, such as Chemistry, Organic Chemistry, and Genetics. These classes were incredibly difficult, and the vast amounts of homework and studying took a toll on me. Baking helped me to release the stress and keep me focused. I always thought baking is a science: you follow a recipe to create something, just like you follow a procedure to obtain results in an experiment. Kitchen, research lab, same difference, right?


This past summer was tough for me because I finished my four years and I needed to find a job. While in college, I realized I loved being in the lab, though I knew something was missing. I thought I wanted to land a job as a research scientist, but when I spoke to someone in the field, he made me realize that it was not for me. During my job search, I baked cookies, brownies, cakes, and cupcakes that I gave away with utter abandon. I doled out my confections to family, friends, neighbors, and the firemen that came one evening when the smoke alarm when off (Don’t ask. I now know what not to do when making caramel.) They all praised me for my skill. Most recipients told me I should sell my products!ava12

Today, I am halfway through the Professional Pastry Arts Program. I have already learned so much, from baking cookies and piping rosettes to learning how to properly ice cakes with butter cream. I even had the honor of volunteering at a Jacques Torres demonstration, and it was an amazing experience. It was like watching Picasso paint! I also love that I can go home to teach my mom some of the techniques I’m learning. She sparked my love for baking and taught me so much over the years, so it is nice for me to be able to teach her for a change. 

Follow along with Ava’s adventures on Instagram, via @ava_szabby.

website-saddle-slate

#InsideICC Holiday Hacks: Loaf Pan Saddle Technique + Pumpkin Bread Recipe

Watch as ICC Pastry Chef Instructor Aleishe Baska demonstrates how to properly saddle your loaf pan to prevent your favorite breads from sticking to the pan! Full recipe below!

Pumpkin Bread Recipe

Yield: 2 standard loaf pans

 

Ingredients:

  • 10 oz.  All-Purpose Flour
  • ½ tsp Salt
  • ½ tsp Baking Powder
  • 1 tsp Baking Soda
  • 1 tsp Ground Cloves
  • 1 tsp Ground Nutmeg
  • 1 tsp Ground Ginger
  • 10 ½ oz. Granulated Sugar
  • 1 oz. Molasses
  • 4 oz. Butter
  • 15 oz. Pumpkin Puree
  • 2 oz. Nuts, toasted and chopped (optional)

Instructions:

  1. Preheat oven to 325°F
  2. Prepare pan with release spray and saddled in parchment paper.
  3. Sift flour, salt baking powder, baking soda and spices. Reserve.
  4. Cream butter, sugar, and molasses.
  5. Slowly add eggs.
  6. Add drys, alternating with pumpkin and nuts(optional)
  7. Divide into loaves
  8. Bake for 50-60 minutes or until a paring knife inserted into the center of the knife comes out clean.
  9. Unmold immediately and allow to cool to room temperature before wrapping or slicing.

 

mannequin-challenge

Watch ICC’s Culinary Arts Students Do the Mannequin Challenge

Watch as ICC Level 4 Culinary Arts students take a break from working hard in the classroom, to standing completely still. Watch as ICC students engage in the latest social media trend, the Mannequin Challenge. Special thanks to Chef Jeff Butler, Chef Herve Malivert and Chef Karen Chirgwin for participating as well!

 

For more information on our Professional Culinary Arts program, click here.

pie-image

Inside ICC Holiday Hacks: Simple Pie Dough

In our latest edition of Inside ICC: Holiday Hacks, Pastry Chef Instructor Michael Zebrowski shows how to create a simple, yet perfect pie crust that will bring your homemade pies to the next level! Full recipe below.

 

Ingredients – Yields 10 (6-inch) pies 

1000 grams all-purpose flour

2 1/2 teaspoons salt

2 1/2 teaspoons sugar

560 grams cold butter, cut into 3/4 inch cubes

16 grams white vinegar.

Manual Process [As seen in video]

  • Combine the flour, salt and sugar in a large bowl. Sprinkle the cubed butter pieces over the dry ingredients
  • Using a bowl scraper or fingers, cut or rub the butter into the dry ingredients until the pieces are about 1/4 inch, or approximately the size of green peas.
  • Combine the ice water and the vinegar. Sprinkle half of the liquid over the butter and flour mixture. Using a rubber spatula or by hand, gently toss the mixture to incorporate. Continue adding the liquid, a little at a time, until the mixture forms a rough, shaggy dough. The dough should just hold together when pressed between two fingers.
  • Turn the dough out onto a lightly floured work surface. Divide the dough in half and gently shape it into two rounds. Wrap the dough in plastic wrap and refrigerate for at least 1 hour, preferably overnight. The dough can be refrigerated for up to 2-3 days or frozen for 1-2 months.
foodnetworkmagazinecookingschool2016ku2hn2zyuhgx

The Food Network Magazine Cooking School Experience

Written by Kait Freeberg
ICC Food Writing Student

This past weekend, I had one of the most incredible experiences of my professional career.

My dream of one day becoming a food writer has led to cooking recipes that come to me by way of cookbook or recommendation, and then writing about the experience in my notebook for practice. Over the last few years, I have grown a fondness and drawn inspiration from Maile Carpenter, editor-in-chief of Food Network Magazine. As an ICC graduate and someone who is constantly improving her writing career, she has become a figure I look up to in the culinary world.

So, when I discovered I had an opportunity to meet her, I jumped at the chance. Food Network was hosting its very first cooking school and created a foodnetworkmag1partnership with ICC to bring it together. There were two sessions being offered, one in the morning and the other in the afternoon. After signing up for the afternoon class, I arrived 30 minutes early in hopes of being at the front of the line. However, there were many guests already lined up. Some had even purchased their tickets months ahead of time to guarantee themselves a space. After speaking to a number of these guests, I discovered that the majority were house moms who read Food Network Magazine in their downtime. Once I was allowed inside ICC, we received our itinerary and I was assigned in Group D. After the ICC hosted lunch, guests would go to their assigned classrooms. I would learn how to make pie dough and then move along to an “everything turkey” demonstration, ending with a hands-on appetizer creating experience. But for now, it was time to mingle with the others.I found myself a drink and took my time looking around the room at everyone who was attending.

There was a buzz of excitement in the air. Some participants were lining up to take photographs with Chopped Judge and restaurateur, Marc Murphy. Others were piling their plates high with sandwiches, sides and cookies, and making their way to a space at the belly bars. And then, she caught my eye. Maile Carpenter was standing off to the side of the room, behind a very large November edition of Food Network Magazine. She was alone, scanning the
room and taking in the scene. Knowing this would be my one and only chance to speak to her, I immediately gathered up my courage and went straight over.

What followed was a conversation I won’t soon forget. Maile was so kind and took a genuine interest in what I had to say. She gave me some very useful career advice about pursuing my food writing dream, and even accepted my business card when I asked if we could email further. I am so happy that I pushed out of my comfort zone, took a risk and put myself out there. Now I have a great memory to share with my friends and hopefully one day, I could be working for Maile.

From the beginning, the event was very well organized. I learned how to make flaky, buttery pie dough, and taste a version of apple and pumpkin pies that the student helpers made. Our pastry foodnetworkmagazinecookingschool2016moqwtwltyikxchef, Lindsay Busanich, allowed us to take our creation home. Knowing my pie dough wouldn’t survive the flight back to California, I offered mine to David, a dad from Long Island whose children sent him to this event as a birthday gift. He was very thankful.

The turkey demonstration was by far the most informational and educational aspect of this day. I took so many notes that I ran out of paper! Chef John Cumming allowed the audience to ask questions, and he patiently answered them while showing us the best techniques to use on Thanksgiving Day. I am currently testing my newfound knowledge on a chicken, to get the brining method just right before the big turkey.

Our last course ended making appetizers with Chef Herve Malivert. He taught us how to create meatballs, cheesy potato skins and fresh hummus, which were all big crowd-pleasers. Our group was treated to a tequila cocktail, and we snacked on our tasty creations to end the afternoon.

foodnetworkmagazinecookingschool2016qywqjsiyoipxAfter our class concluded, we collected our items from the coat check and were handed gift bags from the Food Network staff. They were filled with items that would definitely come in handy for Thanksgiving day-aluminium foil, chicken stock, olive oil, kitchen utensils, coupons and more. At the end of it all, I am incredibly grateful that ICC sent me to this event. Not only for the people I was able to meet, but for the experience of being in the professional kitchens. It reignited a fire inside of me and now I can’t wait to eventually be a student at ICC. This was more than an awesome experience- it was a day that furthered my career and my dreams.

 

 

 

Connect with Kait on social media via @afreebirdlife or on LinkedIn via Kait Freeberg 

All photos provided by Getty Images 

 

ds3a99901

What Veterans Say About the International Culinary Center

ICC is beneficial to vets looking to capitalize on a comprehensive benefit and financial aid package. ” – Michael C, ICC Culinary Arts, 2013

 

Attending the International Culinary Center is a very life-changing experience. You are in the company of people that love food, that believe in respecting the ingredients and teach you how to become a better cook. The energy from the staff and the knowledge is amazing.

Admissions personnel are very helpful and make sure that you are guided in the right direction. You just don’t go to school there, you get to make lifelong friends. To all the chef-instructors there from Chef Butler, Chef Sixto, Chef Henri, Chef Candy, Chef Joseph to Chef Jose, thank you so much for sharing your knowledge and passion with us. I will be eternally grateful and proud to be an ICC alumni.”  – Diego R, ICC Culinary Arts, 2013

 

The International Culinary Center is the culinary school I dreamed of attending for a grand diploma in Pastry Arts. When they accepted the Post 9/11 GI Bill and offered veteran scholarships, I knew I had to seize this opportunity. It is a decision I will never regret. The chef-instructors are top-notch, the class sizes are small enough for individual attention and feedback, and the experience is amazing. If you are considering a career in the culinary or pastry world, ICC should be your top choice.” – Julie Couture, ICC Pastry Arts, 2014 

 

As an alumnus, I truly believe that attending ICC was one of the best decisions of my life. After my discharge from the military and business school, there was something else I was looking for in my life and decided to attend ICC. After my graduation from ICC, I got a job offer from a Charter School as a Head Chef. Now I absolutely love my job along with job security as a NYC employee. – Mohammed Ahmed, ICC Culinary Arts, 2013

 

I am a current student at ICC and I can honestly say that besides the military, this is the best time of my life. I’ve been to 3 different colleges and withdrew because it either wasn’t for me or I just didn’t like it. At ICC, it is completely different! I wake up every morning completely looking forward to coming to school. I thought that I got lucky having the chef-instructors that I have, and realize every single one of them is AMAZING and I couldn’t pick a favorite if I wanted to. I’ve never met a school staff so loving and helpful even after they get you to enroll! At ICC, it’s genuine and I couldn’t have picked a better school. I actually don’t want to leave… to the point that I want to do every course possible until my G.I Bill runs out. I never do reviews, but I just have to for my school because I am so honored to be a part of it and highly recommend it to anyone! I’ve only been here 5 months and I’ve learned SO much, I feel like I can teach other people. Not only are you learning here, you’re having fun and also building a family that I can say I will remember forever!” – Shaquana, ICC Pastry Arts, 2014