How to Write a Cookbook Series: Writing Cookbook Proposals

Free event, RSVP to

Join us on August 26th 3:30 – 5:00pm in the ICC Amphitheater for the next event in our How to Write a Cookbook series. This panel features three authors demystifying the process of writing a cookbook proposal.

Diana Kuan is a New York-based writer and cooking teacher. Her first cookbook The Chinese Takeout Cookbook came out from Random House/Ballantine in late 2012. Diana grew up watching her family run a Latin-flavored Chinese restaurant in Puerto Rico, and later a Polynesian-style take-out and Cantonese bakery in suburban Boston. She writes the blog Appetite for China which is about traditional dishes as well as creative takes on Chinese food and dishes that became popular due to the Chinese Diaspora around the world. If Diana can successfully apply her French culinary training to stir-fries, there is no reason traditional and non-traditional forms can’t co-exist.

ICC Alum Carrie King writes mainly on the subject in which she is most interested, food: a passion that has been clear since uttering one of her first discernible words – fries. She has cooked in restaurants in France, Ireland and New York, and spent a number of years working for various food-related nonprofits and teaching cooking classes before shifting gears to focus on her freelance writing career. Most recently, in addition to print pieces in Gather Journal and Life & Thyme, she co-wrote Amanda Freitag’s first cookbook, The Chef Next Door and is currently working with critically acclaimed chef Missy Robbins on her own debut book.

Cathy Erway likes to cook. She likes to discover new ingredients, dishes and techniques, and learn to cook them without any formal culinary training. From September 2006 through September 2008, she went AWOL from eating restaurant, take-out, or street stand food throughout the five boroughs of New York City. While becoming an office brown-bag queen and eating pretty much only food prepared herself, she explored other avenues of “not eating out” — diving into dumpsters, foraging for edible weeds, cooking for communal dinners and supper clubs, and throwing or participating in amateur cook-offs and events. Cathy wrote a book about this experience, called The Art of Eating In: How I Learned to Stop Spending and Love the Stove. In 2015, she took home-cooking back to her mother’s roots and published The Food of Taiwan Cookbook. Cathy blogs at Not Eating Out in New York.

While the three authors have very different backgrounds and experiences, all three went through the process of writing a cookbook proposal and publishing their books. So if you are interested in writing a cookbook yourself or want to learn more about these fascinating women, please RSVP to

Bonus: there will be books available for sale and signing after the event!